How to Build JBoss Tools 4.0 with Maven 3

Version 12

    This document has moved to https://github.com/jbosstools/jbosstools-devdoc/blob/master/building/how_to_build_jbosstools_4.adoc

     

    This document replaces  How to Build JBoss Tools 3.3 with Maven 3.

     

    Note that this article only discusses building from trunk. To work with another branch, see Learn.GitHub - Branching and Merging.

     

    Looking for how to build our documentation? See Building JBoss Tools Documentation.



     

     

    Environment Setup

    Prerequisistes

    1. Java 1.6 SDK
    2. Maven 3.0.3
    3. About 6 GB of free disk space if you want to run all integration tests for (JBoss AS, Seam and Web Services Tools) - requires VPN access
    4. subversion client 1.6.X  (should work with lower version as well, but newer versions may not work as expected)

    Maven and Java

    Make sure your maven 3 is available by default and Java 1.6 is used.

     

     mvn -version

     

    should  print out something like

     

    Apache Maven 3.0.3 (r1075438; 2011-02-28 12:31:09-0500)

    Java version: 1.6.0_25, vendor: Sun Microsystems Inc.

    Java home: /usr/java/jdk1.6.0_25/jre

    Default locale: en_US, platform encoding: UTF-8

    OS name: "linux", version: "2.6.42.3-2.fc15.x86_64", arch: "amd64", family: "unix"

     

    Maven settings

    Follow these instructions to add reference to JBoss Repositories into your settings.xml. You'll also probably need access to the SNAPSHOT repository. So here is what you should see in your ~/.m2/settings.xml

     

    {code:xml}

    <settings xmlns="http://maven.apache.org/SETTINGS/1.0.0" xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance" xsi:schemaLocation="http://maven.apache.org/SETTINGS/1.0.0 http://maven.apache.org/xsd/settings-1.0.0.xsd">

       ....

        <profiles>

            ....

            <profile>

                <id>jboss-default</id>

                <repositories>

                    <!-- To resolve parent artifact -->

                    <repository>

                        <id>jboss-public-repository-group</id>

                        <name>JBoss Public Repository Group</name>

                        <url>http://repository.jboss.org/nexus/content/groups/public/</url>

                    </repository>

                    <repository>

                        <id>jboss-snapshots-repository</id>

                        <name>JBoss Snapshots Repository</name>

                        <url>https://repository.jboss.org/nexus/content/repositories/snapshots/</url>

                    </repository>

                </repositories>

     

                <pluginRepositories>

                            <!-- To resolve parent artifact -->

                            <pluginRepository>

                                    <id>jboss-public-repository-group</id>

                                    <name>JBoss Public Repository Group</name>

                                    <url>http://repository.jboss.org/nexus/content/groups/public/</url>

                            </pluginRepository>

                            <pluginRepository>

                                    <id>jboss-snapshots-repository</id>

                                    <name>JBoss Snapshots Repository</name>

                                    <url>https://repository.jboss.org/nexus/content/repositories/snapshots/</url>

                            </pluginRepository>

                    </pluginRepositories>

            </profile>

        </profiles>

     

        <activeProfiles>

            <activeProfile>jboss-default</activeProfile>

            ...

        </activeProfiles>

    </settings>

    {code}

     

    Maven & Java Memory Configuration

     

    To configure the amount of memory used by Maven, you can define MVN_OPTS as follows, either in the mvn / mvn.bat script you use to run Maven, or set as global environment variables. Here's how to do so for Fedora, Ubuntu, Windows, OSX.

     

    {code}

    set MAVEN_OPTS=-Xms512m -Xmx1024m -XX:PermSize=128m -XX:MaxPermSize=256m

    {code}

     

    Verify or Install?

    mvn verify will perform all build and test steps, but it won't install the bundles in your local repository. mvn install does install in you local repository. When an eclipse-plugin is installed in your repo, it is always used as default when resolving dependency. It is not possible to roll-back a local installation of a bundle, so in most cases, mvn verify is to be prefered to mvn install. However, if you want to build stuff sequentially through several maven invocations, and you want to resolve against just-built stuff, you'll need to use mvn install.

    In this page, we'll encourage people to use mvn verify as much as possible to ensure isolation; but you can mvn install the same way if your use-case requires it.

     

    What if I've already built something locally, but I want to build against the server version instead of my local repo?

     

    There are two approaches that work here:

     

    a) override temporarily when building, using -Dtycho.localArtifacts=ignore

     

    b) delete ~/.m2/repository/.meta/p2-local-metadata.properties

     

    The target platform (TP) lists all dependencies (coming from Eclipse.or and other 3rd-party update sites) that are used by JBoss Tools. This target platform is materialized as an Eclipse p2 repository (formerly update-site) that is used during build to resolve dependencies. Target Platform is managed by JBoss Tools people, and only dependencies from this TP are allowed to be used in code.

    If you need a new dependency in the TP, feel free to open a ticket to request it.

     

    Here are several ways to build locally using this target platform. It's up to you to choose the one that match your needs:

    unified.target refers to the dependency as published in the Target Platform repository.

    • Pros:
      • No additional thing to do than invoking Maven
      • Always up-to-date
    • Cons: Speed - (to evaluate)

    Consume it by adding -Punified.target to you Maven invocation command-line

    Or, getting a local copy of the Target Platform

    Get it

    Download TP as a zip and install it by yourself

     

    You can either download the TP as a zip and unpack it into some folder on your disk. Just remember to update your settings.xml file to point at the location where you unpacked it.

     

    You can get it with a browser or a command line tool such as wget or curl at the following url:

     

        http://download.jboss.org/jbosstools/updates/juno/SR0c/e420-wtp340.target.zip (current minimum TP)

        http://download.jboss.org/jbosstools/updates/juno/SR1a/e421-wtp341.target.zip (current maximum TP)

     

    and then unzip it :

     

    unzip *.target.zip -d /path/to/jbosstools-build/target-platforms/jbosstools-JunoSR0c/multiple/target/multiple.target.repo/

      or

    unzip *.target.zip -d /path/to/jbosstools-build/target-platforms/jbosstools-JunoSR1a/multiple/target/multiple.target.repo/

     

    OR, use Maven to build it

    See Building Parent Pom & Target Platforms Locally

    Use it as a Maven mirror

    Once you get the target platform available locally, you can use it instead of the remote sites to save time. For this, we can simply use Tycho target-platform mirroring: http://wiki.eclipse.org/Tycho/Target_Platform/Authentication_and_Mirrors#Mirrors

    As example, you can simply edit to your ~/.m2/settings.xml the definition of the repositories to mirror: (replace /home/hudson/static_build_env/jbds/.... by a path where your local repository actuaaly stands)

    {code:xml}

    <settings>

         <mirrors>

    <!-- IMPORTANT: Sites in target platforms: must not have trailing slash! -->

            <mirror>

                <id>jenkins.jbosstools-JunoSR0c</id>

                <mirrorOf>http://download.jboss.org/jbosstools/updates/juno/SR0c/REPO</mirrorOf>

                <url>file:///home/hudson/static_build_env/jbds/target-platform_4.0.juno.SR0c/e420-wtp340.target/</url>

                <layout>p2</layout>

                <mirrorOfLayouts>p2</mirrorOfLayouts>

            </mirror>

            <mirror>

                <id>jenkins.jbosstools-JunoSR1a</id>

                <mirrorOf>http://download.jboss.org/jbosstools/updates/juno/SR1a/REPO</mirrorOf>

                <url>file:///home/hudson/static_build_env/jbds/target-platform_4.0.juno.SR1a/e421-wtp341.target/</url>

                <layout>p2</layout>

                <mirrorOfLayouts>p2</mirrorOfLayouts>

            </mirror>

            <mirror>

                <id>jenkins.jbdevstudio-JunoSR0c</id>

                <mirrorOf>http://www.qa.jboss.com/binaries/RHDS/updates/jbds-target-platform_4.0.juno.SR0c/REPO</mirrorOf>

                <url>file:///home/hudson/static_build_env/jbds/jbds-target-platform_4.0.juno.SR0c/jbds600-e420-wtp340.target/</url>

                <layout>p2</layout>

                <mirrorOfLayouts>p2</mirrorOfLayouts>

            </mirror>

            <mirror>

                <id>jenkins.jbdevstudio-JunoSR1a</id>

                <mirrorOf>http://www.qa.jboss.com/binaries/RHDS/updates/jbds-target-platform_4.0.juno.SR1a/REPO</mirrorOf>

                <url>file:///home/hudson/static_build_env/jbds/jbds-target-platform_4.0.juno.SR1a/jbds600-e421-wtp341.target/</url>

                <layout>p2</layout>

                <mirrorOfLayouts>p2</mirrorOfLayouts>

            </mirror>

        </mirrors>

    </settings>

    {code}

     

    (Optional) Build parent and target platform

    This step is only useful if you are actually working on the parent or the target platforms and want to test local changes. Otherwise, Maven will simply retrieve parent and TP definitions from JBoss Nexus to perform your build.

    See Building Parent Pom & Target Platforms Locally

     

    Sometimes, Maven can't find the upstream artifacts - parent pom, tycho plugins, minimum (Juno SR0) or maximum (Juno SR1 or later) target platforms. First try again with the "-U" maven option. Or maybe you want to build them locally in order to see how Tycho builds them, or contribute a fix. To work around resolution problems, just build locally:

     

    {code}

    cd /tmp; git clone git clone git://github.com/jbosstools/jbosstools-maven-plugins.git

    cd /tmp; git clone git clone git://github.com/jbosstools/jbosstools-build.git

    cd jbosstools-maven-plugins/tycho-plugins; mvn install; cd -

    cd jbosstools-build/parent;  mvn install; cd -

    cd jbosstools-build/target-platforms; mvn install -Pjbosstools-minimum,jbosstools-maximum

    {code}

     

     

    Building Individual Components Locally Via Commandline

    Build a component resolving to a recent aggregation build for other JBT dependencies (Recommanded)

    • Pros:
      • You build only your component
      • You only need source for your component
      • Speed to resolve deps: +
      • You get generally the latest build for you component
    • Cons:
      • Takes some time to resolve dependencies on other component
      • Can sometimes be out of sync if no build occured recently for a component you rely on and had some important change. More risk to get out of sync than with the staging site.

     

    Tracked by https://issues.jboss.org/browse/JBIDE-11516

     

    example:

    cd jbosstools-server

    mvn verify -P unified.target -Pjbosstools-staging-aggregate

    Build a component resolving to the latest CI builds for other JBT dependencies

    • Pros:
      • You build only your component
      • You only need source for your component
      • You get generally the latest build for you component
    • Cons
      • Takes some time to resolve dependencies on other component
      • Can sometimes be out of sync if no build occured recently for a component you rely on and had some important change
      • Speed to resolve deps: -

     

    This profile is the one use for CI builds on Hudson.

     

    cd jbosstools-server

    mvn verify -P unified.target -Pjbosstools-nightly-staging-composite

     

    Build a component along with all its dependencies from sources ("bootstrap" build)

    This will build exactly what you have locally

    • Pros:
      • You are sure of the version of sources that is used for your JBT dependencies
      • You don't loose time in resolving your JBT deps
    • Cons:
      • You need sources for your dependencies too
      • You often build more stuff that what you really want to test

     

    cd ~/trunk/jbosstools-server

    mvn verify  -P unified.target -Pbootstrap

    Building Everything In One Build Locally Via Commandline

     

    LINUX / MAC USERS

     

    cd jbosstools-build

    mvn clean install -gs ~/.m2/settings.xml | tee build.all.log.txt

     

    (tee is a program that pipes console output to BOTH console and a file so you can watch the build AND keep a log.)

     

    WINDOWS USERS

     

    cd c:\trunk\jbosstools-build

    mvn3 clean verify -gs file:///${user.home}/.m2/settings.xml

       or

    mvn3 clean verify -gs file:///${user.home}/.m2/settings.xml > build.all.log.txt

     

    Remember to adjust your settings.xml file to specify where you have your local target platform mirror built (or where you downloaded & unpacked a target platform zip. Windows users, if you don't have a .m2 folder, see this article.

     

    Building Locally In Eclipse

     

    First, you must have installed m2eclipse into your Eclipse (or JBDS). You can install the currently supported version from this update site:

     

    http://download.jboss.org/jbosstools/updates/juno/

     

    Next, start up Eclipse or JBDS and do File > Import to import the project(s) you already checked out from SVN above into your workspace.

    Screenshot.png

     

    Browse to where you have the project(s) checked out, and select a folder to import pom projects. In this case, I'm importing the parent pom (which refers to the target platform pom). Optionally, you can add these new projects to a working set to collect them in your Package Explorer view.

    Screenshot-1.png

    Once the project(s) are imported, you'll want to build them. You can either do CTRL-SHIFT-X,M (Run Maven Build), or right-click the project and select Run As > Maven Build. The following screenshots show how to configure a build job.

     

    First, on the Main tab, set a Name, Goals, Profile(s), and add a Parameter. Or, if you prefer, put everything in the Goals field for simplicity:

     

    clean install -B -fae -e

     

    Be sure to check Resolve Workspace artifacts, and, if you have a newer version of Maven installed, point your build at that Maven Runtime instead of the bundled one that ships with m2eclipse.

    Screenshot-2.png

    On the JRE tab, make sure you're using a 6.0 JDK.

    Screenshot-3.png

    On the Refresh tab, define which workspace resources you want to refresh when the build's done.

    Screenshot-4.png

     

    On the Common tab, you can store the output of the build in a log file in case it's particularly long and you need to refer back to it.

    Screenshot-5.png

    Click Run to run the build.

     

    Screenshot-6.png

    Now you can repeat the above step to build any other component or plugin or feature or update site from the JBoss Tools repo. Simply import the project(s) and build them as above.

     

    Installation Testing - making sure your stuff can be installed

    Each component, when built, produces a update site zip and an unpacked update site which can be used to install your freshly-built features and plugins into a running Eclipse or JBDS instance.

     

    Simply point your Eclipse at that folder or zip, eg., jar:file:/home/rob/code/jbtools/jbosstools-server/site/target/server.site-*.zip! or file:///home/rob/code/jbtools/jbosstools-server/site/target/repository/, and browse the site. If your component requires other upstream components to install, eg., jbosstools-server depends on jbosstools-base, you will also need to provide a URL from which Eclipse can resolve these missing dependencies. In order of freshness, you can use:

     

    1. http://download.jboss.org/jbosstools/updates/nightly/core/trunk/ (Nightly Trunk Site - updated every few hours or at least daily - bleeding edge)
    2. http://download.jboss.org/jbosstools/builds/staging/_composite_/core/trunk/ (Composite Staging Site - updated every time a component respins - bleedinger edge)
    3. http://anonsvn.jboss.org/repos/jbosstools/trunk/build/aggregate/local-site/ (see the README.txt for how to use this site to refer to things you built locally - bleedingest edge)

     

    Adding a new feature or plugin to an existing component

     

    Need to tweak a component to add a new plugin or feature? See https://community.jboss.org/wiki/AddingAPluginandorFeatureToAnExistingComponent.

     

    Dealing with timeouts for tests

    (To be rewritten soon...) http://lists.jboss.org/pipermail/jbosstools-dev/2012-September/005835.html

     

    Tips and tricks for making BOTH PDE UI and headless Maven builds happy

    It's fairly common to have plugins compiling in eclipse while tycho would not work. Basically you could say that tycho is far more picky compared to Eclipse PDE.


    Check your build.properties

    Check build.properties in your plugin. If it has warnings in Eclipse, you'll most likely end with tycho failing to compile your sources. You'll have to make sure that you correct all warnings.

     

    Especially check your build.properties to have entries for source.. and output.. -- these are needed to generate source plugins and features.


    source.. = src/
    output.. = bin/
    src.includes = *
    src.excludes = src
    bin.includes = <your own,\
        list of,\
        files for inclusion,\
        in the jar>
    

     

    Check your manifest.mf dependencies

    A new issue when building against juno shows that all compilation dependencies MUST be EXPLICITLY mentioned in your manifest.mf list of dependencies. A recent example of how this can cause compilation errors is the archives module, which failed to build due to the org.eclipse.ui.views plugin, and its IPropertySheetPage interface, not being found during the build. After investigation, it was discovered that the archives.ui plugin did not explicitly declare a dependency on org.eclipse.ui.views.

     

    Inside eclipse and during Juno-based builds, however, the depencency was found and there were no compilation errors. This was because a plugin archives.ui explicitly dependend on (org.eclipse.ui.ide) had an explicit dependency on org.eclipse.ui.views.  The IDE was able to see that archives.ui dependended on org.eclipse.ui.ide, and org.eclipse.ui.ide depended on org.eclipse.ui.views. 

     

    Resolving nested dependencies no longer seems to be guaranteed, and so anything you have a compilation dependency on must now be explicitly declared in your manifest.mf