Binary numbers cannot exactly represent decimals.

Use BigDecimal for currency calculations.

...using the constructor that takes a String as a parameter.

Don’t:

            String str = new String(“This is bad.”);

 

Do:

            String str = “This is good.”;

navuri prasad

Temporary Fields

Posted by navuri prasad Jan 23, 2012

If a variable need not be shared across methods, make it local.

private int x;

int method() {

x = 0;    // if you forget to initialize, you're dead

...         // do some stuff

return x;

}

 

int method() {

int x = 0;

...         // do some stuff

return x;

}

navuri prasad

Accessible Fields

Posted by navuri prasad Jan 23, 2012

Fields should always be private except for constants.

Accessible fields cause tight coupling.

Accessible fields are corruptible.

If a field needs to be accessed, use “get” and “set” convention.

navuri prasad

Duplicate Code!

Posted by navuri prasad Jan 23, 2012

Every time you need to make a change in the routine, you need to edit it in several places. 

Don’t copy-paste code!

navuri prasad

Null pointers

Posted by navuri prasad Jan 23, 2012

When an attempt to access an object is made, and the reference to that object is null, a NullPointerException will be thrown.

The cause of null pointers can be varied, but generally it means that either you haven't initialized an object, or you haven't checked the return value of a function.

navuri prasad

Capitalization errors

Posted by navuri prasad Jan 23, 2012

While there's no silver bullet for detecting this error, you can easily train yourself to make less of them. There's a very simple trick you can learn :-

all methods and member variables in the Java API begin with lowercase letters

all methods and member variables use capitalization where a new word begins e.g - getDoubleValue()

 

While there's no silver bullet for detecting this error, you can easily train yourself to make less of them. There's a very simple trick you can learn :-

all methods and member variables in the Java API begin with lowercase letters

all methods and member variables use capitalization where a new word begins e.g - getDoubleValue()

The simplest method is to make your variables private (but you do that already,  right?) and to use synchronized accessor methods. Accessor methods allow access to private member variables, but in a controlled manner. Take the following accessor methods, which provide a safe way to change the value of a counter.

 

public class MyCounter{

    private int count = 0; // count starts at zero

     public synchronized void setCount(int amount)

    {

        count = amount;

    }

   

    public synchronized int getCount()

    {

        return count;

    }

}

If you've come from a C/C++ background, you may not find this quite as much a problem as those who have used other languages. In Java, arrays are zero-indexed, meaning that the first element's index is actually 0

public static void main(String args[])

    {

    try {

    // Your code goes here..

    }

    catch (Exception e)

    {

    System.out.println ("Err - " + e );

    }

    }

When you pass a primitive data type, such as a char, int, float, or double, to a function then you are passing by value. That means that a copy of the data type is duplicated, and passed to the function. That means that a copy of the data type is duplicated, and passed to the function. If the function chooses to modify that value, it will be modifying the copy only.

 

When you pass a Java object, such as an array, a vector, or a string, to a function then you are passing by reference.So that means that if you pass an object to a function, you are passing a reference to it, not a duplicate. Any changes you make to the object's member variables will be permanent

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