3 Replies Latest reply on Jul 11, 2006 4:57 AM by Tom Baeyens

    Comments on "BPM_The_Glue_Between_Analysis_and_Implementatio

    Elias Ross Master


      Although I don't work with BPM, I work with domain-specific programming languages a lot at work and have dealt with layers of abstraction and defining boundaries between business and developer levels.

      The discussion is facinating to me. It seems like Tom and Keith are mostly agreeing, and probably would agree 90% with each other if put in the same room.

      Having a very good email node and a web interface might be sufficient for a lot of use cases. Adding in web service calls (JBoss ESB?) would probably get you to 80%. Personally, I'm a bit of an optimist.

      Perhaps you'd like to share specific stories or use cases that couldn't be represented in some sort of graphical tool.

        • 1. Re: Comments on
          Tom Baeyens Master

           

          "genman" wrote:

          The discussion is facinating to me. It seems like Tom and Keith are mostly agreeing, and probably would agree 90% with each other if put in the same room.


          Indeed, and we don't have to be in the same room for that. You put it exactly as i feel as well.

          "genman" wrote:
          Having a very good email node and a web interface might be sufficient for a lot of use cases. Adding in web service calls (JBoss ESB?) would probably get you to 80%. Personally, I'm a bit of an optimist.

          Perhaps you'd like to share specific stories or use cases that couldn't be represented in some sort of graphical tool.


          IMHO, everything can be made configurable through a form in a graphical tool. But the problem is the completeness of the language. You can't define a language that is makes everything configurable on the level of a non-tech person.

          • 2. Re: Comments on
            Ronald van Kuijk Master

             

            But the problem is the completeness of the language. You can't define a language that is makes everything configurable on the level of a non-tech person.


            What about Dutch? All the non-tech people speak it fluently over here, well almost (the Belgiums always win the 'Groot dictee der Nederlandse taal' )



            • 3. Re: Comments on
              Tom Baeyens Master

              Dutch is great for informal description of your business processes. The graphical designer will add more support for descriptions in dutch (and any other language) soon.

              To bad that we can't yet make the computer understand it properly. Although i know of some companies trying to do that...