1 Reply Latest reply on Jan 24, 2006 12:34 PM by Damon Sicore

    Shotoku Questions

    Norman Barker Newbie

      Hi,

      it was with some excitement that I saw JBoss was going to integrate the subversion command functionality into an Enterprise environment (we use Subversion a lot here). I would like to ask a couple of questions about the future implementation.

      1) What protocol will Shotoku use to commit add files, will it be a wrapper around SVN, could it use SOAP with attachments?

      2) In the nature of enterprise level deployments, will Shotoku support durable uploads, with notifications if an upload fails?

      4) Any support for large file uploads?

      3) Will it be possible to get support for Shotoku from the JBoss group?

      Only thoughts so far, this project looks quite useful, for auditing workflows it is nice to have version control.

      Many thanks,

      Norman

        • 1. Re: Shotoku Questions
          Damon Sicore Novice

           

          "nbarker" wrote:
          Hi,

          it was with some excitement that I saw JBoss was going to integrate the subversion command functionality into an Enterprise environment (we use Subversion a lot here).


          Thanks! We've very positive interest so far and we hope to be able to provide full enterprise integration for content repositories using ejb3 style annotations. See below.

          "nbarker" wrote:

          I would like to ask a couple of questions about the future implementation.

          1) What protocol will Shotoku use to commit add files, will it be a wrapper around SVN, could it use SOAP with attachments?


          Shotoku uses the JavaSVN libraries to do the actual commit; however, I think you are referring to how a client might submit content to Shotoku. There's been discussions concerning how that might happen (i.e., via a web service or RMI or anything else). Since Shotoku is simply enabling POJOs to access content repositories seamlessly, there's nothing stopping you from making your POJOS available via a web service (See the JBossWS project). So, if you had a SOAP service, you could Shotoku-ify that service to enable it to access the content repository. We haven't decided whether or not we will provide an example implementation of such access until we add support for all three types of repositories (i.e., JCR, SVN, and filesystem). But, if people ask for it, we will add such a simple service as an example Shotoku application.


          "nbarker" wrote:

          2) In the nature of enterprise level deployments, will Shotoku support durable uploads, with notifications if an upload fails?


          If a commit fails to the specified repository, Shotoku will notify. Currently, there's no notion of "upload" in Shotoku. Shotoku is a client to the repository and not a server. As I mentioned above in the SOAP question, this doesn't preclude you from using Shotoku in a server-side application that supports durable uploads.


          "nbarker" wrote:

          4) Any support for large file uploads?


          Shotoku will support whatever file upload sizes the content repository it is interfacing with supports. Remember, Shotoku is a client to the repository and not a file server that accepts files. How the file gets to Shotoku is up to the specific application you are creating. Our applications that use Shotoku (i.e., the entire JBoss Labs site) don't use java clients to submit content (or web services). We use any of the many Subversion clients in the wild to control content. That was one of the main reasons we did this. We can control the processes around content using existing tools while at the same time we have an easy as dirt API to access content and be notified of content changes, on the server side using annotations.


          "nbarker" wrote:

          3) Will it be possible to get support for Shotoku from the JBoss group?


          I hope so! Email sales@jboss.com asking for support!

          "nbarker" wrote:

          Only thoughts so far, this project looks quite useful, for auditing workflows it is nice to have version control.


          Yes, we feel the same way. A direct application of Shotoku is to version and manage business processes.