6 Replies Latest reply on Mar 5, 2010 10:29 AM by M Hakimi

    JBPM and WSDL

    M Hakimi Newbie

      Hi,

       

      I'm new to JBPM and trying to evaluate this product in order to replace our current workflow engine.  I'm using JBPM 4.3 with jboss-5.0.0.GA and Eclipse plug-in.

       

      I need to communicate with web services by importing a wsdl or something like that.  I've done some search on the net, unfortunately, could find my answer.  Can you please help me or point me to some documentation that can get me started on this?  As I said I just started in this topic and don't have much knowledge, hopefully my question is clear...

       

      I appreciate your help.

       

      Best Regards

       

      Maro

        • 1. Re: JBPM and WSDL
          Maciej Swiderski Master

          Hi,

           

          afaik there are no automatic activity to communicate with a web service but since it is a java you can use what ever you like to communicate with web service (axis, cxf, etc) and embed it in java or custom activity in your process.

           

          HTH

          Maciej

          • 2. Re: JBPM and WSDL
            M Hakimi Newbie

            many thanks...

             

            do you know how would I package it?  Should I include my WS in a jar and include it in the classpath?

            • 3. Re: JBPM and WSDL
              Maciej Swiderski Master

              It depends how you are going to use jBPM - will it be stand alone engine or embedded in your application.

               

              Take a look at user guide, section about deploying process definition and its resources.

              http://docs.jboss.com/jbpm/v4/userguide/html_single/#deployingbusinessarchives

               

              I think it is better to include all required resources/classes in business archive. Such approach gives you possibility to control classes and resources within different versions that can live together.

              • 4. Re: JBPM and WSDL
                M Hakimi Newbie

                thank you...

                 

                Have few questions and appreciate any answer.

                 

                1- In your previous email, you said in order to consume a webservice inside a jbpm process we need to develop code, is there any other tools that can be integrated with jbpm process like either bpel or bpmn2 that has support for webservice? 

                 

                2- I read somewhere in the developer guide of version 4.0 that "Currently, only Java service invocations are supported by the jBPM engine, but Web service invocations are planned for a future release."  Is this still in progress?  I am just wondering if there is a way to use capability of the tool to consume a web service rather develop code for it? 

                 

                3 - If there is no other way, which process would you use for the webservice?  java, task or custom?  In development guide for 4.0 it says use java task process for web service, but in jbpm 4.3, we don't have an option for the java task, there is only task.

                 

                 

                Thanks

                 

                best regards

                 

                Maro

                • 5. Re: JBPM and WSDL
                  Sebastian Schneider Master
                  You don't really have to develop code to access the webservice. You can use a webservice framework for Java (e.g. Axis2) and generate the necessary stub classes from the WSDL provided by your webservice. Afterwards you can use a java task to call this stub classes directly or you can create a class making calls to the stub classes (probobably the better solution). The java and the custom task are the only ones suitable for automatic activities. The user tasks (as the name implies) is just for user interaction via task-forms or any other GUI.
                  • 6. Re: JBPM and WSDL
                    M Hakimi Newbie

                    Thank you very much for clearification.

                     

                    Best regards

                     

                    M.