4 Replies Latest reply on Nov 5, 2001 10:06 PM by hamish carpenter

    EJB architecture described with UML class  diagramm

    Maris Orbidans Newbie

      hello

      Is there a good UML class diagramm that describes
      EJB architecture ? Like entity bean, session bean and so on. If you know one, please let me know.

      thanx
      Maris Orbidans
      smike@apollo.lv

        • 1. Re: EJB architecture described with UML class  diagramm
          Dickerns Israel Newbie

          You might want to take a look at a book called Enterprise Java with UML. It is a very good book on UML and J2EE. You will find plenty of EJB UML diagrams in there.

          • 2. Re: EJB architecture described with UML class  diagramm
            hamish carpenter Newbie

            I have this book and find it excellent. My only gripe is that it doesn't mention JSP pages whatsoever so I'm unsure how to model them :(

            Better intro to OO analysis than my tertiary course!

            • 3. Re: EJB architecture described with UML class  diagramm
              Erik Sliman Apprentice

              ASPs (Active Server Pages) are analogous to JSPs. Rational Rose reverse engineers ASPs as COMPONENTS.

              At first I thought this was weird. Our first instinct is to think of them as some type of class. But, the more I thought about it, the more it made sense to call them components.

              A single ASP/JSP can perform multiple functions, and provide multiple user interfaces. Yet, it does not have an object interface, so a class is not appropriate. It can be parameterized, and it always performs at least one function. If it looks like a component, smells like a component, and tastes like a component, then it must be a component.

              The best you get out the UML it is navigation and dependency diagrams. The reverse engineering showed the components it used (dependency), as well as other ASP/HTML pages it called (navigability/dependency).

              However, the diagram of all the pages was so complex, its only purpose for us was a nice wall hanging demonstrating just how complex our system was. In reality, we knew the system enough to not need the diagram, and a new developer might look at the diagram and just say "huh?". After all, you really don't understand it until you look at the code and use the system; if you look at the code, then you don't usually need the diagram anymore.

              • 4. Re: EJB architecture described with UML class  diagramm
                hamish carpenter Newbie

                > However, the diagram of all the pages was so complex,
                > its only purpose for us was a nice wall hanging
                > demonstrating just how complex our system was. In
                > reality, we knew the system enough to not need the
                > diagram, and a new developer might look at the
                > diagram and just say "huh?". After all, you really
                > don't understand it until you look at the code and
                > use the system; if you look at the code, then you
                > don't usually need the diagram anymore.

                Its pretty hard to strike a good balance :(

                Thanks for the suggestions.