3 Replies Latest reply on Aug 4, 2002 12:26 AM by Frederick N. Brier

    JBoss.Net/Flash Hello World sample

    Frederick N. Brier Newbie

      I recently checked in an update to the Flash Hello World program in ./jboss.net/samples/Hello. It is made up of a simple EJB .jar, .war, .wsr, bundled in an .ear. The interesting elements are the generating of the deployment descriptors and building of the archives via XDoclet and Ant. There are also some Actionscript classes to support SOAP from within Flash. These are still undergoing changes. The next enhancement will add support for BASIC-AUTH and https. Please feel free to post your comments, suggestions, or problems. Thank you.

      Fred.

        • 1. Re: JBoss.Net/Flash Hello World sample
          Dr. Christoph Georg Jung Newbie

          Fred,

          great work. I had to let my jboss.net activities sleep for some time because we upgraded the release of our ERP product to jboss3.x

          Hopefully I will checkin the new .net stuff next week.

          • 2. Re: JBoss.Net/Flash Hello World sample
            Bruce Scharlau Newbie

            Frederick,

            it looks cool! Much nicer than the previous incarnation. I especially like the echo effect.

            What I'm wondering though is why the example spits out xml and doesn't connect to a client that then feeds back the reponse to the browser? I know it's easier, sort of, to do it the way you did - we had students doing that with servlets in soap 2.2. Still, I'm curious.

            cheers

            Bruce

            • 3. Re: JBoss.Net/Flash Hello World sample
              Frederick N. Brier Newbie

              Sorry about the delay replying. I am still not in the habit of going to the JBoss forum web pages.

              The Flash Actionscript program is the client. It directly communicates to the SOAP server. I'm not sure I understand your question. The Actionscript classes generate a SOAP request which goes through the FlashAxisServiceServlet to the Axis engine and directly connects to the EJB. There is no reason to have a client on the server to invoke a SOAP request. SOAP's use of XML allows two different languages and environments to communicate. Over http you don't worry about fire walls. However, it does involve overhead. If the operation request did exist over the server as in a JSP, why use SOAP at that point, unless you were communicating with yet another 3rd party service? You are likely on the same network, if not the same server. As a JSP, I would directly invoke the EJB, versus going through SOAP to talk to the EJB. Now if I was a Java client application on the outside of a fire wall trying to talk to a server, I might be tempted to use SOAP. If I am overlooking something, please feel free to let me know.

              > Frederick,
              >
              > it looks cool! Much nicer than the previous
              > incarnation. I especially like the echo effect.
              >
              > What I'm wondering though is why the example spits
              > out xml and doesn't connect to a client that then
              > feeds back the reponse to the browser? I know it's
              > easier, sort of, to do it the way you did - we had
              > students doing that with servlets in soap 2.2. Still,
              > I'm curious.
              >
              > cheers
              >
              > Bruce