2 Replies Latest reply on Aug 26, 2004 6:22 PM by janprill

    Where does JBoss keep its services at hard drive?

    First Name Last Name Newbie

      I have to write a service for JBoss to work with MS SQL Server... I've never did it before...

      How to do it, and where will my service be kept at the hard drive?

      Service should be like this:

      User --- clicks button "Show Users" ---> JBoss --- SELECT * FORM Users ---> MSSQL Server --- ResultSet ---> JBoss

        • 1. Re: Where does JBoss keep its services at hard drive?
          First Name Last Name Newbie

          is it possible to use
          org.apache.axis.client.Call
          to call JBoss services? or it is used to call someting else?

          • 2. Re: Where does JBoss keep its services at hard drive?
            janprill Novice

            Hi, Question,

            if you want to stay conform to the J2EE spec, you should make yourself familiar with EJB, especially CMP and CMR. This means Container Managed Persistence and Container Managed Relationship. Using these techniques you get a Object-Relational Mapping from JBoss, which in it's 4.0 Release now officially conforms to J2EE 1.4.

            For your example you will define a CMP Entity-Bean that persists to your User-Table in MS SQL. As datasource you will deploy a MSSQL-DS.xml to JBOSS. You'll find examples in $JBOSS_HOME/docs/examples/jca.

            While I was beginning to enter this terrain myself I found a series of tutorials of Rick Hightower very useful. You'll find one of them under http://www-106.ibm.com/developerworks/edu/ws-dw-wscomp-i.html and the sequels over a google research. Right now they are a little outdated since the EJB-Spec went to 2.1, but they will do a pretty good job anyway. In addition you'll get free Doco on this site (Community > Documentation). Finally you should have a look at persistence frameworks like Hibernate and JDO. To understand which framework fits your needs you want come along without learning about their strategies.

            Best regards
            Jan Prill