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Weekly Editorial

18 Posts authored by: Jason Porter

This is a smaller editorial this week, but by no means does that mean we haven’t been busy!

Releases

Blogs

As stated, this was a smaller one this week, but still, some great stuff happening! Everyone have a happy summer!

Sorry, we missed last week. We’re pulling double duty this week to get you all caught up on the latest with JBoss!

 

Red Hat Summit 2018

First, we would like to thank everyone who attended Red Hat Summit 2018 in San Francisco! This was a tremendous week full of amazing talks, keynotes, and fun! Middleware played a big role in many of the keynotes, which if you happened to miss are available on our YouTube channel. We hope you all enjoyed this year’s Summit as much as we did!

Continuing from last week, thank you, Mark, we have a number of jBPM related posts this week. There are also some related Hibernate posts. Shall we start with releases?

 

Releases

Both of these are bug fix releases.

 

Blogs

Nicola Ferraro posted a very well thought out and in-depth article about the Saga pattern in Apache Camel (version 2.21.0 or higher). Not familiar with the Saga pattern, not sure when, or how you would use it, this blog is for you. Head on over to his blog to learn more.

 

Eric Schabell has been on the West Coast of the USA for a few weeks. While there, he was invited to speak at the Portland Java User Group (PJUG). If you weren’t one of the lucky 29 people in attendance, that isn’t a problem. You can hit the recap and see his slides over on his blog.

 

Vlad Mihalcea released the weekly Hibernate Community Newsletter a few days ago. It highlights a number of articles, releases, and Q&A for the Hibernate suite of projects. Certainly worth a glance to get back up to speed with the latest happenings within that community!

 

As stated earlier, jBPM had a number of blog posts this past week. Two of them (http://mswiderski.blogspot.com/2018/04/jbpm-work-items-repository-tips-tricks.html and http://mswiderski.blogspot.com/2018/04/jbpm-work-items-are-really-simple.html) relate to Work items. Work items are the way to build custom services which can be used within a process. Maciej teaches more in the mentioned blog posts. He also wrote about KIE Server custom queries in jBPM 7.8. Lastly, there’s a recap of bpmNEXT 2018 Day 3 over on Kris Verlaenen’s blog.

 

We hope you have enjoyed this week’s JBoss Weekly editorial! We also look forward to seeing you at Red Hat Summit 2018 in San Francisco!

This week, uncharacteristically, has had few releases, but a number of blog posts! Great news for our readers. Welcome to another edition of the JBoss Weekly Editorial!

 

Releases

Three releases happened this past week:

Each of these releases contains a number of bug fixes and features. Hibernate 5.2.15.Final and Hibernate Validator 6.0.8.Final are both drop-in replacements for the previous versions. The update to Debezium should also be a drop in replacement, but blog post doesn’t specifically call it out.

 

Blogs

The blogs this week are based on three main categories:

  • Infinispan
  • Cloud/Microservices

  • General

 

The Inifinispan Team would like to introduce you all to the HotSwig project. Read more about it at http://blog.infinispan.org/2018/03/a-swig-based-framework-to-build-hotrod.html. HotSwig allows you to build a Hotrod client prototype based on SWIG. This is a great project if you want to use Hotrod with a language which doesn’t have its own dedicated Hotrod client.

 

Galder Zamarreño has some help for those of you using Infinispan in Docker on a Mac. It can be difficult to access Inifinspan due to a known issue with the internal IP address not being accessible externally. If you’ve fought with this issue, be sure to see the workaround proposed at http://blog.infinispan.org/2018/03/accessing-infinispan-inside-docker-for.html.

 

HTTP is very well used and well-known protocol today. Less well known and used is HTTP/2. In his blog post, Sebastian Łaskawiec tackles getting started with Inifinspan and HTTP/2. Read http://blog.infinispan.org/2018/03/rest-with-http2.html if you’re interested.

Vinay Bhalerao is starting a series about 3Scale and Identity Management. In this first post, Vinay introduces the use case and some basic details. Head over to the Red Hat Developers blog post for the whole article: https://developers.redhat.com/blog/2018/03/06/redhat-3scale-identity-management/

 

Antoine Sabot-Durand over on the Red Hat Developers blog introduces you to the Eclipse MicroProfile Fault Tolerance specification and subsequent implementation in Wildfly Swarm. You may be familiar with Hystrix or Failsafe. The specification provides you with a standard API to use and stay loosely coupled to the third party libraries. It’s great to see some standardization in this area!

 

If you haven’t heard of Istio, or are curious to learn more, read Don Schenck’s blog post introducing Istio. Don does a great job doing a quick introduction and high-level overview of Istio and service mesh.

Jeff Mesnil expands on how the MicroProfile 1.2 release can be used by Java developers writing microservices on OpenShift. https://developers.redhat.com/blog/2018/03/05/cloud-native-microprofile-config-healthcheck-openshift/ is decently in-depth and gives you a great starting place to leverage all the latest and greatest from MicroProfile 1.2

 

Eric Schabell recently launched his new book, Effective Business Process Management with JBoss BPM! He blogged about it over at http://www.schabell.org/2018/03/book-launced-effective-business-process-management-with-jboss-bpm.html. It will be a great addition for anyone getting started or looking for some more information about Business Process Management!

 

Wildfly 12 introduced some CLI tools for keystore manipulation. This is great news for anyone tired of trying to do all of that by hand. Our very own Farah Juma recently blogged about the new capabilities over on her blog: https://developer.jboss.org/people/fjuma/blog/2018/03/02/manipulating-keystores-using-the-cli-in-wildfly-12.

 

To finish off our week, many of us at Red Hat and also out in the community, are gearing up for Red Hat Summit 2018! Mike Guerrette gives us the rundown on a number of excellent talks and speakers over on the Red Hat Developer Blog: https://developers.redhat.com/blog/2018/03/07/red-hat-summit-2018-focus-modern-app-development/. There are so many good things happening at Red Hat Summit this year! We’re all looking forward to seeing you there!

 

Thanks again for coming back to another edition of the JBoss Weekly Editorial!

Welcome, everyone to month two of 2018! There have been some exciting things in the world during this past week. We’re excited to bring to you our round-up of the week in Red Hat Middleware!

CoreOS

The first announcement we have isn’t really middleware related, but it is certainly part of the larger Red Hat family. Many of you may have seen the announcement a few days ago about CoreOS and Red Hat. Yes, it is true, Red Hat is acquiring CoreOS. We believe this will further Red Hat’s stance and leadership within the Kubernetes community. For additional Q&A outside the official announcement, linked above, there is an FAQ posted over on the Red Hat blog.

Releases

Let’s move along and take a look at releases within Middleware:

Blogs

The Infinispan team is getting the word out about executing code in the grid. This allows you to really put that Inifinispan/JDG cluster to work and do more than provide fast caching, which of course is nothing to scoff about. If you have data in that grid, use Infinispan to reason about and execute those questions in the grid!

 

The Hibernate Newsletter came out yesterday. Read about their community over on the blog post. You’ll find information about releases, Stack Overflow questions, forum posts and other blog posts from their community.

In keeping with the current theme of data, the Teiid team would like people to know about Teiid Spring Boot. This will allow you to use Teiid without the need of setting up a server if you’re using Spring Boot. This solution will be a great addition to your microservices toolbox!

Lastly for data, if you are familiar with Microsoft SQL Server and OpenShift, you can now use them together! Over on the Developer Blog, Takayoshi Tanaka blogged about using SQL Server on OpenShift. It runs SQL Server on RHEL within OpenShift. Head on over and learn how to get started!

 

Our own Christian Posta, evaluates Envoy and Istio circuit breaking with Netflix Hystrix over on his blog. Circuit breaking is a great tool to use if you’re talking to services within your application. You never know when something is going to go down, and your application breaking because of some dependency down the line isn’t always acceptable. Hystrix is often thought of as "the standard" in doing circuit breakers. It’s a great primer and dive into two different solutions!

Yesterday was another DevNation Live session. This session focused on Istio canaries and k8s (Kubernetes). If you missed the live feed and would like to catch up, feel free to watch it on YouTube!

Thanks for staying with us for another week!

Welcome back to another edition of JBoss Weekly! We’re excited to bring to you news from across the net relating to JBoss Middleware. Those of you who attended Devoxx Belgium, we hope you had the opportunity to speak with our engineers there!

Releases

 

We’ll kick off the editorial with the releases made in Middleware this past week:

As you can see, the Arquillian team has been on a roll this past week! Congratulations to the team and all those who helped to make it happen.

Releases aplenty this past week! A job well done to all our engineers and community contributors, thanks for all the help!

Blog Highlights

 

Those of you getting started with Docker and Java, you’ll want to check out Amit Nijhawan’s post about how to deploy Java applications with Docker. It’s a great primer.

React is a great thing, and becoming very popular. Samuel Mendenhall shares a plenitude of advice from rebuilding an Angular app to a React app. It’s a longer post, but if you’re getting started with React, or experiencing some difficulties you’ll want to read it.

If you’re at the point of embracing Java 9 and the new modules system, you’ll be thrilled to know that starting with Red Hat JBoss Developer Studio 11.1 supports Java 9! Eclipse doesn’t have to be running on Java 9, but a Java 9 JDK must be on the build path for the project. JBDS 11.1 offers help to convert to Java modules as well. Read Jeff Maury’s post about the Java 9 support for full details.Lastly, the Red Hat Developer Program has rolled out a new topic about secure programming. We all know security isn’t something to be taken lightly, however, it isn’t always the easiest of things to understand and get right. Lucy Kerner details the current tools on the website. Be sure to read both and get a good idea of what’s being offered and how it can help!

Thanks everyone for another amazing week! We hope you’re prepared for the year-end holidays and hope you have a fantastic week.

Welcome back to another weekly editorial! Those of you catching up from JavaOne, we hope you found time to visit the booth and try out OpenShift.io! There are a number of posts to cover this week, so, let’s get started.

Releases

 

We’ll start out with releases this time. There’s only three of them this week, but that doesn’t mean we’ve slacked off.

Announcements

 

By far the biggest announcement in the Java EE space happened earlier in the week with the announcement of EE4J! Our very own Mark Little blogged about it. If this is the first you’re seeing of it, be sure to read Mark’s blog and check out the charter. Everyone is welcome to participate. Please sign up for the mailing list and help us all move Enterprise Java forward!

If you’re running on RHEL, you may be excited for the next couple of blogs from Mike Guerette. Earlier in the week, Red Hat announced the availability of Red Hat Developer Toolset 7.0 Beta. This beta brings updates to GCC (7.2) and adds Clang/LLVM 4.0.1, Go 1.8.3, and Rust 1.2.0 to the list of supported compilers! In addition to those, Mike also announced Red Hat Software Collections 3.0 Beta which includes other updates and also new additions.

Blog Highlights

 

To round out the week, there are a number of blog posts we’d like to highlight.

Wildfly

Wildfly 11 will bring with it a number of changes. Among those changes is integration with Apache ActiveMQ Artemis. Be sure to read the blog for changes and new features available. There’s also support for OpenSSL. The post details setup, security realms, and Elytron all with OpenSSL support! Lastly, Wildfly 11 improves the existing referential integrity found in Wildfly 10.

Spring Boot on Kubernetes

Kamesh Sampath has done a series of posts over on the Red Hat Developer blog detailing configuring Spring Boot on Kubernetes. The introduction of the series covers the initial idea of using Kubernetes for configuration of a Spring Boot application. Part I covers using ConfigMaps for configuration. Part II details the use of Secrets for sensitive information. These are great alternatives to the Spring Config server.

OpenSlava

Lastly, Eric Schabell was at OpenSlava this past week. All of his talks and slides are available on his blog and SlideShare!

 

Thank you, everyone! We hope you’ve had a great week!

Happy Java 9 day! Hope everyone is enjoying a new version of Java and getting used to Jigsaw. Sorry, we missed last week, but we’ll get you all caught up here. Again, our hearts go out to those affected by the natural disasters of the past couple of weeks. We hope you and your loved ones are all safe.

 

Project blogs

 

A number of blogs went out over the past two weeks. Let’s start off by connecting Hawkular services over SSL at the Hawkular blog. We all know microservices are the rage right now. Are you considering breaking up your monolith application into microservices? Christian Posta offers his low-risk migration ideas in a multi-part blog post. JBoss Developer Studio 11 will be releasing sometime in the future, and what better way to get started than by learning how to set up all those services that aren’t installed out of the box? Infinispan blog. You can also get this going on OpenShift!

Travels, Videos, and Presentations

 

We’re fast approaching the conference season for the year! JavaOne is happening at the start of October, JAX London the following week, Devoxx Belgium the first part of November, with QCon San Francisco shortly after that. If you’re attending any of those conferences, be sure to look out for Red Hat! Coming up next week, if you’re a developer using or even trying out Drools, jBPM, or Optaplanner, be sure to put September 26th on your calendar. Drools Days in NYC is happening that day. You can also catch the live stream as well. Two days after that in Washington D.C. will be another event. Lastly, a couple of weeks ago Galder was talking about Big Data with Infinispan. You catch the recording over at YouTube in case you missed it.

Welcome everyone, to another edition of JBoss Weekly! We have some great news to share with you all this week. I hope you’ve stayed current with other happenings out in the Java world over the past couple of weeks, including Mark Reinhold’s blog post about moving Java faster. If you missed that, you can read the whole blog post at https://mreinhold.org/blog/forward-faster.

 

 

People Joining the Team

The Hibernate team had two new additions to the team this past week: Arnold Galovics and Jakub Kubrynski! Welcome to team guys!

 

 

Project blogs

Out in the blogosphere, we have two great blog posts about Keycloak and Hawkular. Keycloak in version 3.3.0.CR1 added support for cross-site replication. More information about this feature and an example of how it is used can be found at the Keycloak blog.

The Hawklar blog discussed alerts and OpenTracing earlier this week. It’s a great read and has an example to follow along with as well.

 

A number of blogs about WildFly went out this week. The first talks about FIPS-compliant credential stores within Wildfly. If you’re storing credentials, it’s certainly worth looking into and making sure you’re compliant with FIPS if you need to be. The next three blog posts talk about the WildFly Elytron project, which is the underlying security subsystem in WildFly 11. Farah Juma discusses using EJBs with Elytron in a two part blog series. Both blog posts have information about getting started started and contain code snippets. Continuing with the Elyton theme, Darran Lofthouse explored using Elytron with Undertow standalone for those times you need something really lightweight.

 

A couple of blogs about jBPM and Drools were released over the past week as well. Tihomir discussed the idea of integrating systems with processes. He talks about how processes are usually done in multiple steps and often require multiple systems. jBPM is a wonderful way to integrate these systems and control the whole process. Read Tihomir’s blog for more information. Next up, Mark Proctor ponders the question of whether optimization is Artificial Intelligence (AI) or Operations Research (OR) in his blog post titled Is Optimization AI or OR?For anyone interested in the field of AI, it’s a very good read with some great references to go even deeper.

 

Travels, Videos, and Presentations

Presentations this past week have been a little slow, but we’re gearing up for JavaOne happening in San Francisco at the start of October. Still, Eric Schabell was out at the Red Hat Forum in Finland earlier in the week. Catch up on his talk and see the slides over on his blog.

Claus Ibsen may have already finished his APAC tour last month, but if you missed him, you can at least see his talk from Melbourne over on his blog.

 

Lastly, if you happened to miss week’s DevNation Live this past week, Galder Zamarreño was presenting about Infinispan. Check it out at the DevNation Live page. While you’re there, sign up to be notified of other DevNation Live events!

We’d also like to share an interview done back in April with Eric at Red Hat Summit:

Releases

Lastly, what would a week at Red Hat Middleware be without some releases? We have you covered, don’t you worry! Arquillian released Universe 1.1.13.7 earlier this week. Read more about the release on the Arquillian website. There’s also a new Drone release: 2.4.2! Again, read all about it on the release page.

 

Wildfly Swarm released version 2017.9.4, yep, you read that right. There were some issues with the releases this time around and they had to burn x.9.0-x.9.3. Regardless, it’s a new release and some new changes, bug fixes, and feature requests. Read about it at the release blog.

Thanks, everyone! To all those experiencing natural disasters this week and into the weekend, our thoughts go out to you all. Stay safe!

Another week has come to a close. It’s been a great week, full of blogs, releases and travel recaps within the JBoss Community! Here’s a quick recap of what has happened this week.

Red Hat Summit Interview with Sebastien Blanc

 

 

You all heard about Red Hat Summit 2017, probably multiple times. While I was there, I was able to get some time with some of our developers and do some quick interviews! These interviews will be highlighted here on the Weekly Editorial. The first one I’d like to highlight is my interview with Sebastien Blanc, aka Sebi. Sebi has contributed to AeroGear and is currently working on Keycloak, a security solution. In this interview we talk about what Keycloak is, how I would use it, and why it’s important.

 

Releases

 

A number of releases have happened over the past week!

Arquillian

 

The Arquillian team is really churning out the releases, with five releases this past week!

Hibernate

 

Hibernate Validator 6.0.0.Beta1 with Bean Validation 2.0.0.Beta1 support was released this past week! It requires Java 8. Go grab it and play around with some of the new features and validations in this release!

APIMAN

 

The APIMAN 1.3.0.Final release came out early this week and includes a number of bug fixes, improved documentation, a headless registry and the Vert.x Gateway has been polished and is officially released!

CDI 2.0

 

Fast on the heals of the JCP Ballot finishing, we can officially announce that CDI 2.0 is finished! You can also start playing with it using Weld 3.0.0, which is detailed in the release announcement.

Immutant

 

The Immutant team has released Immuntant 2.1.7 which includes some updates to Undertow and Ring. It also fixes some issues with applications not being able to properly respond to HEAD request.

Travels

 

Because Red Hat Summit is over doesn’t mean travels are over! Our developers and community have been around ta many other conferences over the past week or two. Check out the recaps of these conferences in the various blogs:

Hello, everyone! Welcome back to the pre-Summit JBoss Weekly Editorial! I’m sure you all know that Red Hat Summit is happening next week, we’re looking forward to seeing you there! Many of us will be giving talks or hanging around at the booth, please stop by and say hi.

As you might have guessed, a lot of the information for this week’s editorial will be about Summit. That isn’t to say that there hasn’t been some other stuff that has happened. Let’s get into it!

Releases

Byteman has pushed out a couple of new releases: 3.0.10 and 4.0.0-BETA5 to be exact. 3.0.10 is a bug fix release and intended for JDK8 and earlier. 4.0.0-BETA5 contains the same bug fixes as 3.0.10 and some others targeting JDK9. Of course, you can checkout the release notes for the version you’re interested in.

 

Teiid 9.3-Beta1 was released last Friday. You can read the release on the blog for more information. This release includes support for LEAD/LAG/FIRST_VALUE/LAST_VALUE functions. There’s also been some initial work done for Couchbase connectivity and SQLAlchemy/Superset. The team would appreciate any feedback you have if you’re using any of those data stores.

 

The Infinispan group released Hotrod clients C++/C# 8.1.0.Final earlier in the week. There are a number of feature requests and enhancements that went into this release, as well as a good helping of bug fixes. Read more about them in the release notes.

Apache Manifold 2.7 was released earlier in the week. It includes a brand new UI, SharePoint 2016 support and improved connectors for a number of different data stores. 40 improvements and issues have been resolved in this release. Congratulations to the team on a job well done!

Conferences

Of course, there’s all the stuff happening at Red Hat Summit. Quite a bloggers projects being showcased at Summit. This is turning out to be a spectacular event this year, you certainly won’t want to miss it!

 

There’s also the Great Indian Developer Summit wrapping up this week. Galder Zamarreño is there speaking about Infinispan of course! His talks touch on Big Data and reactive applications using Infinispan. Both wonderful topics!

It’s a busy week for us coming up, hoping to see you there!

Other goings on

We’ll finish up this editorial with some general happenings within the community.

 

Those of you following Debezium will already know, but Randall Hauch has stepped down from running the project and has taken a position with Confluent! We wish him the greatest of success in his new position! To fill the void, Gunnar Morling has stepped up and will be filling Randall’s place. Gunnar is no stranger to open source and data. He’s worked for a number of years on Hibernate, Bean Validation as well as other. We’re looking forward to great things coming from Debezium and Gunnar!

 

In keeping with the data theme, Guillaume Smet wrote about Simple Query String on the Hibernate blog. The feature came out with Lucene 4.7.0 and support in Hibernate Search version 5.8.0.Beta1. It is a powerful way of building up a query without having to wade through all the Lucene query documentation. Hibernate Search has a DSL for it and the team is looking for feedback. If this is something you’re using, or looking at using, please give them your feedback.

 

In the Vert.x camp, Benoit Hediard blogged about creating an application using Angular on the front-end and Vert.x on the back end. He goes through reasons to use this stack and also walks you through a basic proof of concept to get you going.

 

Corinne Krych blogged about debugging Karam tests over on her blog. If you’ve been using Karma it may not always be that easy to get things working. Head over and read Corinne’s example and setup for getting started debugging those tests!

 

Have you thought about securing your containers? Eric Schabell certainly has. In fact, he wrote a post about getting all those things secured. It’s certainly worth the read if you’re using containers and need to make sure everything is on the up and up!

 

Our last entry this week comes from Christian Posta about calling your services and why it’s difficult. Microservices isn’t easy, and getting them right is even more difficult. Christian continues talking about the most difficult parts of microservices.

 

Thank you all for reading and again, we’re looking forward to seeing you all at Red Hat Summit!

Welcome back everyone! We’ve been busy this past week. A number of new releases have been completed this past week, a considerable amount of news, and all topped with a generous amount of content to boost your programming chops! We’ll dive in first with the new releases, follow-up with news, then look at the other content.

 

Releases

 

There were nine releases last week! We’re really tearing it up out there with the release trains. Projects seeing releases this past week include Byteman, Wildfly Swarm, Hibernate Search and Validator, Teiid, and Hawkular Services. Listed below you can see the various release blog announcements below.

News

 

Some very exciting things happened last week, and our engineers were there to capture and blog about it!

First up is CDI 2.0, which is now in Public Review. Go through and read all the changes and how it will change CDI in this next version.

Eric Schabell and many others, possibly including you, have received acceptances to Red Hat Summit 2017. You can read about what Eric will be talking about in his blog entry: Upcoming Red Hat Summit session

A couple of entries from the Hawkular universe came in last week. Hawkular APM: Comparing performance of service versions discusses how you can compare the performance of different versions of a service as part of a continuous deployment pipeline. Display custom events in Grafana discusses using and displaying Grafana Annotations as points in time on your charts.

In a blog post and demo, Windup 3.0 for Eclipse IDE, Ondrej Zizka showcases the Windup 3.0 eclipse plugin. It’s still in development but is progressing along nicely. Lastly, and somewhat off the beaten path, Martin Sebor recaps his ISO C meeting that happened in October: Trip Report: October WG14 Meeting. For those doing development in C, you’ll want to read up about work being done in C11 and also a review of proposals for C2X, the next "major" revision of C.

Tricks of the Trade

 

Welcome to another edition of the JBoss Weekly Editorial! We are excited to bring you another packed week of JBoss and Red Hat Middleware news. The end of the year is nearly here, but that doesn’t mean we’re slowing down.

Releases

Let’s start with the new bits during the week, shall we?

Teiid continues to move closer to it’s 9.2 release with 9.2 Alpha2. Hashing functions, including md5, sha1, sha2-256 and sha2-512 have been added along with a number of issues being closed with this release. Just over 70 issues have been closed on the road to the 9.2 release currently slated for early to mid February.

Wildfly Swarm has recently released version 2016.12.1. A number of issues have been closed with this release including improvements to UberJar and war cleaning, fewer boot-time warnings, significant improvements to Windows support and JavaDocs! Wildfly Swarm is a slimmed down version of Wildfly Java Application Server for use with Microservices.

Changes to the JDK9 have necessitated another release of Byteman. Andrew Dinn released version 4.0.0-BETA1 earlier this week addressing those changes. Byteman is an invaluable tool for tracing, monitoring and testing Java application JDK runtime code.

On the product side of things, Red Hat Single Sign-on recently released version 7.1 Beta. Included in Red Hat Single Sign-on are features for OpenID connect, Red Hat JBoss Fuse integration, a Node.JS client adapter, SSSD integration, user storage SPI and more! If you’re in need of an SSO solution, look no further.

Notable Blog Entries

This past week includes a number of notable blogs done by the community.

To kick things off, Jason Green blogged about Jigsaw’s Missing Pieces. He includes links to the various issues in the OpenJDK project. Jason breaks down the "missing pieces" into three categories: Reflection issues, dynamic introduction and alteration of modules, and interoperability with alternative module system. He remains hopeful suitable solutions can be found and implemented.

Next, we have Ken Finnigan’s post about whether to WAR or JAR with Wildfly Swarm. Ken briefly describes how to obtain a JAR and a WAR using Maven. He also discusses pros and cons of both approaches. The recommended approach is to us a war with Wildfly Swarm, however, that isn’t a hard rule.

Juraci Paixão Kröhling talked about the recent improvements to Hawkular APM for OpenShift this week. He included steps to get everything setup on Fedora 25. There are also examples to follow along that Juraci mentions!

Vlad Mihalcea discusses what has happened within the Hibernate Community recently in his Hibernate Community Newsletter post. There are many blogs, issues, releases and Q&A posts he links to and are well worth the read if any of them apply to your particular Hibernate usage.

Back in November a number of Red Hat employees spoke at Devoxx Morocco. Galder Zamarreño recapped his trip to Morocco and Geneva over on the Infinispan blog. Galder spoke about building reactive applications using Infinispan, Node.js and Elm.

To round out the Java related news, John Clingan wrote about MicroProfile being adopted into the Eclipse community. MicroProfile has moved quickly since it was announced back in June at DevNation. If you’re interested in joining the discussion, head over to the forums.

Todd Mancini has a somewhat lengthy, but concise blog post about porting .NET Framwork to .NET Core. You’ll want to read through that if you’re currently thinking about migrating to .NET core, or even using it for the first time!

Lastly this week, we have a piece written by Takayoshi Tanaka about getting started with Microsoft SQL Server on Red Hat Enterprise Linux. Microsoft has a simple seven step install document which Tanaka-san builds upon. He describes how to connect to the database using Visual Studio Code, Visual Studio and the command line.

We’ve had a fantastic week here at Red Hat and are looking forward to another one coming up!

 

First and foremost, I’d like to apologize for the tardiness of this post. We’ll make up for it with two posts this week!

Just as Romain promised we’d have lots of releases coming up, we most certainly did! We had 10 new releases between the first of the month and the 7th, that’s an average of more than one new release everyday! We really knocked it out of the park this week. Below you’ll find the new releases and blog posts mentioning them:

Releases

  • Teiid 9.1 CR1 was released on the first. Nearly 180 issues were addressed in this release!

  • Hibernate ORM 5.2.3 tackled 77 issues, many of which were bugs, but a number of improvements were made as well.

  • Wildfly Swarm 2016.10.0 covered enhanced Arquillian support, a simplified ActiveMQ/Artemis configuration, and better SAAJ support for a total of 33 issues.

  • Infinispan Hotrod Clients C\\ / C# 8.1.0.Aplha1 came out on the third. These are updates to some of the native Hotrod clients for use with Inifinspan.

  • Forge 3.3.2.Final resolved nine issues mostly focused around some GUI issues and component upgrades.

  • Hibernate Search didn’t want to be outdone and released three versions!  5.5.5.Final, 5.6.0.Beta3, 5.7.0.Aplha1 were all released on the sixth. It does seem odd that 5.7.0 has a release when 5.6.0 isn’t out, but Sanne explains that in his post, I won’t spoil the fun.

  • Hawkular Metrics 0.20.0 is a pretty important release for the team. It includes Hawkular Alerting, a new compression algorithm and of course enhancements and fixes. All said and done 26 issues were addressed in this release.

  • The Fuse team has been hard at work getting Red Hat JBoss Fuse 6.3 out the door. This is the supported product version. Both Jon and Christina wrote about the release. Jon said thousands of bugs were fixed in this release and includes Camel 2.17, CXF 3.1 and Jetty 9. Read both blogs for an even better understanding of what this means for you!

Blogs

On that note of blogs, there were also some noteworthy blogs coming from other Red Hat Middleware engineers:

  • Claus Ibsen had a three and a half hour delay at the airport last week and wondered if Kubernetes could be installed with one command. I’m sure many of have wondered the same thing (or maybe not). Well, wonder no longer: Installing Kubernetes in one command! He includes a video for you to enjoy the process run.

  • Eric Schabell talked about the great opening of the Red Hat Forum in Finland he spoke at last week at Red Hat Forum Finland 2016 Recap. He has links to slides, pictures and the agenda.

  • Writing a book is no small task, and Jon Anstey is right in the thick of it. His book "Camel in Action" version 2 is in MEAP right now and update recently happened. Read more about it in his blog post Camel in Action v2 MEAP update.

  • John Mazz explains how to get Go and OpenShift Origin installed in his post OpenShift Origin and Go. This is a great write up about how to install OpenShift Origin on your machine. I highly recommend it for getting up and running with OpenShift Origin on your box!

Look for another post later this week covering even more great Red Hat Middleware news!

It’s been a crazy week for the Java Community as a whole with major announcements happening at JavaOne in San Francisco! Java turned 21 this year! Java SE 9 continues to move closer. Java EE 8, is, well, postponed. The Java community continues to thrive and push out amazing technology, and so do we here at Red Hat!

A number of announcements happened this week you’ll probably want to be aware of.

 

News

One of the largest announcements made, at least by Red Hat, was MicroProfile 1.0! A few months back, June to be precise, the MicroProfile was announced. Red Hat, along with IBM, TomiTribe, Payara, and LJC (and SouJava joined since) worked with the community to create a standard around microservices using Java EE. The 1.0 release of MicroProfile finished a few weeks early and there are six different implementations. Read more about MicroProfile at the release blog, or Mark Little’s recap.

 

Juraci Paixão Kröhling explained how to use Hawkular APM in a microservice architecture earlier in the week. His post is informative and heavy on the details and explanation. Head on over if you fall into this camp and are looking for answers!

 

This last one may make some of you a bit squeamish, you have been warned. As of Keycloak 2.2.0 the keycloak-server.json stopped being shipped. All configuration is happening within standalone.xml, standalone-ha.xml, or domain.xml. JSON is often a preferred format, but Stan Silvert explained why XML is better in this instance when he wrote about the demise of they keycloak-server.json a few days ago.

 

Releases

We’re always kicking out new releases of our software. Once again, this week was no different. Hibernate had a couple of releases this past week, ORM 5.0.11 and 5.1.2. Byteman has a 4.0.0-Alpha release which allows Byteman to be used on JDK9! Of course, it continues to work on JDK6-8, and there is one small issue, but read the blog for more information. Lastly, Keycloak 2.2.1.Final was released fixing an issue with the JavaScript adapter released in 2.2.0.

 

Events

Besides JavaOne this week, there were some other events we participated in, and some which are going to be happening!

Eric Schabell discussed Red Hat Forum going to Finland this year. If you’re in that area you won’t want to miss him talking about Open Source, Red Hat and change. There are also some other great speakers lined up for these Red Hat Forums in Europe.

 

To round out our week, Eric Schabell and Claus Ibsen talked about their talks from this week or a couple of weeks ago. Claus attended JDKIO 2016 in Copenhagen where he discussed Apache Camel and Java based microservices. Read about his trip, or watch the recordings in his blog post.

 

In London this week, Eric Schabell talked about private cloud at the London JBug. His slides are available for those interested.

Thanks everyone for making this another wonderful week in tech! Stay tuned for more software, talks, and information as time goes on.

Last updated 2016-09-24 00:56:35 MDT