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Weekly Editorial

24 Posts authored by: Jason Porter

Welcome everyone! We hope everyone is excited (or enjoyed if it has already passed) for the Labor Day weekend if you’re in the U.S. There are some great blog posts over the past couple of weeks we want to highlight and a couple of releases as well.

 

Releases

There are two releases we want to highlight in this editorial. The first is the Keycloak 7.0.0 release! You can of course find all the information you need in the release notes.

Next is the update and release of the new Apache Camel website. The website has had a pretty major overhaul with a new design, graphics, layout and look toward the mobile experience. The website source is hosted on GitHub should you wish to contribute.

Blogs

Oddly enough, the blogsphere has been a little quiet the past couple of weeks, must have something to do with summer.

Red Hat Developer Blog

The Red Hat Developer blog has some great information if you haven’t been there. We’re showcasing just few from the past few weeks:

 

That will do it for this edition of the editorial, thanks for being with us!

Welcome to a post-Red Hat Summit JBoss Weekly Editorial! We just came back from Red Hat Summit 2019 in Boston. What a great week with some amazing news! Of course two big announcements that came out of Summit this year are Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8 and OpenShift 4. Great things coming out of Red Hat these days!

All of that being said, there have been some other interesting happenings this week since Summit. There’s only one release, mostly due to Summit, but we will go over blogs and some great things from the community. That release was JBossWS, see the release post for more information.

Blogs

A number of blogs came out over the past couple of weeks. Check out the blogs featured below!

OptaPlanner

If you weren’t at Summit, or missed the Thursday morning general session, you can see the recording below.

 

Thursday morning general session - May 9 - Red Hat Summit 2019 - YouTube

 

A large part of the demo was handled with OptaPlanner. Geoffrey De Smet has done a series of blog posts detailing its use in the demo:

Geoffrey has some great breakdowns about how OptaPlanner was used, things they learned, and some code as well!

Eric Schabell

Eric Schabell gave a talk at Summit titled "3 Pitfalls Everyone Should Avoid with Microservices." In his blog he details the talk a bit more and gives gives you a link to see the slides.

Eric also has a blog post about setting up integration tooling for CodeReady Studio 12. This will be an ongoing series from Eric. Look for more posts details more information about CodeReady Studio 12.

Welcome to another JBoss Weekly Editorial as we prepare for the end of March! We have a number of releases and blogs posts to highlight, so let’s get to it.

 

Blogs

Christina Lin has a blog detailing which she believes are eight ideas that lead to "catastrophic cloud native microservice" deployments.If you are working with microservices, or are thinking about it, this blog is certainly worth a look.

 

Eric Schabell has written a couple of pieces on integration and has a follow-up lab to better explain the points of integration and automation.

 

Lastly, Brain Stansberry detailed the Wildfly 17 release roadmap over on the Wildfly site.

 

Great stuff is happening within Red Hat! Stay tuned for even more as the year progresses!

Thank you for joining us for another edition of the JBoss Weekly Editorial! We have some great news, blogs, and releases this week! Read further down for more information.

 

Quarkus

 

Quarkus: Supersonic Subatomic Java. As the website describes it: A Kubernetes Native Java stack tailored for GraalVM & OpenJDK HotSpot, crafted from the best of breed Java libraries and standards.

 

Quarkus was released earlier this week with great fanfare! It’s been a nine month journey to get here, but we’re all very excited about what this will enable developers to do. Gone now are the days of tests taking long enough for you to check your Facebook page, hot re-deploys, expensive memory usage, long deploy times.

 

Would you be interested in a REST & JPA application fully starting up in under a second and using less than 40MB of memory? Would you like to save and refresh your web browser to see changes like the dynamic language devs do?

 

You want integration? Quarkus integrates with Apache Camel, Hibernate, Apache Kafka, Jaeger, Vertx, and others! Be sure to buckle in because we’re just getting started.

Read about Quarkus from Emmanuel Bernard, Mark Little, or simply head over to the Quarkus website to learn more! Your productivity will thank you.

New Releases

 

In addition to Quarkus, there have been a number of new releases over the past couple of weeks:

Blogs

 

Security features continue to improve in Wildfly with both the release of Wildfly 16 and Elytron 1.8.0. You can read more about some of the new features and improvements at Darran Lofthouse’s blog.

 

Stain Thorgersen has blogged about WebAuthn and support coming soon to Keycloak.

 

The Infinispan team blogged about releases around the trifecta of cache store releases Cassandra, Cloud, and MongoDB Cache Stores. There’s also a blog by the Inifinspan team talking about the Subatomic Infinispan Client.

All of us are getting ready for the Holiday Season, thank you for taking some time catching up with us this week! The past couple of weeks can be summed up in three words: Releases, jBPM, Integration! Let’s do a quick recap in that order.

 

jBPM

There were a number of blog posts in the jBPM realm over the past couple of weeks. They’ll make for some great reading and a good way to catch up on what’s going on in that space!

Integration

Lastly, we have a few blog posts dealing with integration:

 

Thanks again for sharing some time with us, see you next time!

Welcome back! It has been a busy couple of weeks for us within Red Hat Middleware. Hot on the tails of Oracle CodeOne is Devoxx BE, followed shortly after by Devoxx MA!

 

Red Hat and IBM

We want to start things off with news you have probably heard, but if not, IBM and Red Hat have entered into an agreement where IBM will be purchasing Red Hat. You may have read various blogs, articles or news stories about the acquisition. We asked Mark Little, VP of Engineering here at Red Hat for some thoughts:

They say 24 hours is a long time in politics but maybe it applies to the technology sector too! Between the last time we published the editorial and now Red Hat has agreed to be acquired by IBM. As the public statements from IBM and Red Hat discuss, the deal won’t officially close until the second half of 2019 and until that happens both companies must remain operating as independent entities. There have also been strong statements from both sides that Red Hat will be a separate entity within IBM in order to preserve the benefits of acquiring such a leader in the open source space. At this stage though there are very few details that I or others can share publicly. However, and I’ve written about this in my personal blog, I feel quietly confident that this acquisition (more like a semi-merger) will be good for Red Hat, our communities and our customers, as well as IBM.

Thanks Mark!

Releases

Naturally, there have been a number of releases in the past couple of weeks. Here are some of the highlights:

Blogs

We’d also like to draw your attention to some blogs from the community:

Thank you everyone for being part of the wider Red Hat Middleware family!

This is a smaller editorial this week, but by no means does that mean we haven’t been busy!

Releases

Blogs

As stated, this was a smaller one this week, but still, some great stuff happening! Everyone have a happy summer!

Sorry, we missed last week. We’re pulling double duty this week to get you all caught up on the latest with JBoss!

 

Red Hat Summit 2018

First, we would like to thank everyone who attended Red Hat Summit 2018 in San Francisco! This was a tremendous week full of amazing talks, keynotes, and fun! Middleware played a big role in many of the keynotes, which if you happened to miss are available on our YouTube channel. We hope you all enjoyed this year’s Summit as much as we did!

Continuing from last week, thank you, Mark, we have a number of jBPM related posts this week. There are also some related Hibernate posts. Shall we start with releases?

 

Releases

Both of these are bug fix releases.

 

Blogs

Nicola Ferraro posted a very well thought out and in-depth article about the Saga pattern in Apache Camel (version 2.21.0 or higher). Not familiar with the Saga pattern, not sure when, or how you would use it, this blog is for you. Head on over to his blog to learn more.

 

Eric Schabell has been on the West Coast of the USA for a few weeks. While there, he was invited to speak at the Portland Java User Group (PJUG). If you weren’t one of the lucky 29 people in attendance, that isn’t a problem. You can hit the recap and see his slides over on his blog.

 

Vlad Mihalcea released the weekly Hibernate Community Newsletter a few days ago. It highlights a number of articles, releases, and Q&A for the Hibernate suite of projects. Certainly worth a glance to get back up to speed with the latest happenings within that community!

 

As stated earlier, jBPM had a number of blog posts this past week. Two of them (http://mswiderski.blogspot.com/2018/04/jbpm-work-items-repository-tips-tricks.html and http://mswiderski.blogspot.com/2018/04/jbpm-work-items-are-really-simple.html) relate to Work items. Work items are the way to build custom services which can be used within a process. Maciej teaches more in the mentioned blog posts. He also wrote about KIE Server custom queries in jBPM 7.8. Lastly, there’s a recap of bpmNEXT 2018 Day 3 over on Kris Verlaenen’s blog.

 

We hope you have enjoyed this week’s JBoss Weekly editorial! We also look forward to seeing you at Red Hat Summit 2018 in San Francisco!

This week, uncharacteristically, has had few releases, but a number of blog posts! Great news for our readers. Welcome to another edition of the JBoss Weekly Editorial!

 

Releases

Three releases happened this past week:

Each of these releases contains a number of bug fixes and features. Hibernate 5.2.15.Final and Hibernate Validator 6.0.8.Final are both drop-in replacements for the previous versions. The update to Debezium should also be a drop in replacement, but blog post doesn’t specifically call it out.

 

Blogs

The blogs this week are based on three main categories:

  • Infinispan
  • Cloud/Microservices

  • General

 

The Inifinispan Team would like to introduce you all to the HotSwig project. Read more about it at http://blog.infinispan.org/2018/03/a-swig-based-framework-to-build-hotrod.html. HotSwig allows you to build a Hotrod client prototype based on SWIG. This is a great project if you want to use Hotrod with a language which doesn’t have its own dedicated Hotrod client.

 

Galder Zamarreño has some help for those of you using Infinispan in Docker on a Mac. It can be difficult to access Inifinspan due to a known issue with the internal IP address not being accessible externally. If you’ve fought with this issue, be sure to see the workaround proposed at http://blog.infinispan.org/2018/03/accessing-infinispan-inside-docker-for.html.

 

HTTP is very well used and well-known protocol today. Less well known and used is HTTP/2. In his blog post, Sebastian Łaskawiec tackles getting started with Inifinspan and HTTP/2. Read http://blog.infinispan.org/2018/03/rest-with-http2.html if you’re interested.

Vinay Bhalerao is starting a series about 3Scale and Identity Management. In this first post, Vinay introduces the use case and some basic details. Head over to the Red Hat Developers blog post for the whole article: https://developers.redhat.com/blog/2018/03/06/redhat-3scale-identity-management/

 

Antoine Sabot-Durand over on the Red Hat Developers blog introduces you to the Eclipse MicroProfile Fault Tolerance specification and subsequent implementation in Wildfly Swarm. You may be familiar with Hystrix or Failsafe. The specification provides you with a standard API to use and stay loosely coupled to the third party libraries. It’s great to see some standardization in this area!

 

If you haven’t heard of Istio, or are curious to learn more, read Don Schenck’s blog post introducing Istio. Don does a great job doing a quick introduction and high-level overview of Istio and service mesh.

Jeff Mesnil expands on how the MicroProfile 1.2 release can be used by Java developers writing microservices on OpenShift. https://developers.redhat.com/blog/2018/03/05/cloud-native-microprofile-config-healthcheck-openshift/ is decently in-depth and gives you a great starting place to leverage all the latest and greatest from MicroProfile 1.2

 

Eric Schabell recently launched his new book, Effective Business Process Management with JBoss BPM! He blogged about it over at http://www.schabell.org/2018/03/book-launced-effective-business-process-management-with-jboss-bpm.html. It will be a great addition for anyone getting started or looking for some more information about Business Process Management!

 

Wildfly 12 introduced some CLI tools for keystore manipulation. This is great news for anyone tired of trying to do all of that by hand. Our very own Farah Juma recently blogged about the new capabilities over on her blog: https://developer.jboss.org/people/fjuma/blog/2018/03/02/manipulating-keystores-using-the-cli-in-wildfly-12.

 

To finish off our week, many of us at Red Hat and also out in the community, are gearing up for Red Hat Summit 2018! Mike Guerrette gives us the rundown on a number of excellent talks and speakers over on the Red Hat Developer Blog: https://developers.redhat.com/blog/2018/03/07/red-hat-summit-2018-focus-modern-app-development/. There are so many good things happening at Red Hat Summit this year! We’re all looking forward to seeing you there!

 

Thanks again for coming back to another edition of the JBoss Weekly Editorial!

Welcome, everyone to month two of 2018! There have been some exciting things in the world during this past week. We’re excited to bring to you our round-up of the week in Red Hat Middleware!

CoreOS

The first announcement we have isn’t really middleware related, but it is certainly part of the larger Red Hat family. Many of you may have seen the announcement a few days ago about CoreOS and Red Hat. Yes, it is true, Red Hat is acquiring CoreOS. We believe this will further Red Hat’s stance and leadership within the Kubernetes community. For additional Q&A outside the official announcement, linked above, there is an FAQ posted over on the Red Hat blog.

Releases

Let’s move along and take a look at releases within Middleware:

Blogs

The Infinispan team is getting the word out about executing code in the grid. This allows you to really put that Inifinispan/JDG cluster to work and do more than provide fast caching, which of course is nothing to scoff about. If you have data in that grid, use Infinispan to reason about and execute those questions in the grid!

 

The Hibernate Newsletter came out yesterday. Read about their community over on the blog post. You’ll find information about releases, Stack Overflow questions, forum posts and other blog posts from their community.

In keeping with the current theme of data, the Teiid team would like people to know about Teiid Spring Boot. This will allow you to use Teiid without the need of setting up a server if you’re using Spring Boot. This solution will be a great addition to your microservices toolbox!

Lastly for data, if you are familiar with Microsoft SQL Server and OpenShift, you can now use them together! Over on the Developer Blog, Takayoshi Tanaka blogged about using SQL Server on OpenShift. It runs SQL Server on RHEL within OpenShift. Head on over and learn how to get started!

 

Our own Christian Posta, evaluates Envoy and Istio circuit breaking with Netflix Hystrix over on his blog. Circuit breaking is a great tool to use if you’re talking to services within your application. You never know when something is going to go down, and your application breaking because of some dependency down the line isn’t always acceptable. Hystrix is often thought of as "the standard" in doing circuit breakers. It’s a great primer and dive into two different solutions!

Yesterday was another DevNation Live session. This session focused on Istio canaries and k8s (Kubernetes). If you missed the live feed and would like to catch up, feel free to watch it on YouTube!

Thanks for staying with us for another week!

Welcome back to another edition of JBoss Weekly! We’re excited to bring to you news from across the net relating to JBoss Middleware. Those of you who attended Devoxx Belgium, we hope you had the opportunity to speak with our engineers there!

Releases

 

We’ll kick off the editorial with the releases made in Middleware this past week:

As you can see, the Arquillian team has been on a roll this past week! Congratulations to the team and all those who helped to make it happen.

Releases aplenty this past week! A job well done to all our engineers and community contributors, thanks for all the help!

Blog Highlights

 

Those of you getting started with Docker and Java, you’ll want to check out Amit Nijhawan’s post about how to deploy Java applications with Docker. It’s a great primer.

React is a great thing, and becoming very popular. Samuel Mendenhall shares a plenitude of advice from rebuilding an Angular app to a React app. It’s a longer post, but if you’re getting started with React, or experiencing some difficulties you’ll want to read it.

If you’re at the point of embracing Java 9 and the new modules system, you’ll be thrilled to know that starting with Red Hat JBoss Developer Studio 11.1 supports Java 9! Eclipse doesn’t have to be running on Java 9, but a Java 9 JDK must be on the build path for the project. JBDS 11.1 offers help to convert to Java modules as well. Read Jeff Maury’s post about the Java 9 support for full details.Lastly, the Red Hat Developer Program has rolled out a new topic about secure programming. We all know security isn’t something to be taken lightly, however, it isn’t always the easiest of things to understand and get right. Lucy Kerner details the current tools on the website. Be sure to read both and get a good idea of what’s being offered and how it can help!

Thanks everyone for another amazing week! We hope you’re prepared for the year-end holidays and hope you have a fantastic week.

Welcome back to another weekly editorial! Those of you catching up from JavaOne, we hope you found time to visit the booth and try out OpenShift.io! There are a number of posts to cover this week, so, let’s get started.

Releases

 

We’ll start out with releases this time. There’s only three of them this week, but that doesn’t mean we’ve slacked off.

Announcements

 

By far the biggest announcement in the Java EE space happened earlier in the week with the announcement of EE4J! Our very own Mark Little blogged about it. If this is the first you’re seeing of it, be sure to read Mark’s blog and check out the charter. Everyone is welcome to participate. Please sign up for the mailing list and help us all move Enterprise Java forward!

If you’re running on RHEL, you may be excited for the next couple of blogs from Mike Guerette. Earlier in the week, Red Hat announced the availability of Red Hat Developer Toolset 7.0 Beta. This beta brings updates to GCC (7.2) and adds Clang/LLVM 4.0.1, Go 1.8.3, and Rust 1.2.0 to the list of supported compilers! In addition to those, Mike also announced Red Hat Software Collections 3.0 Beta which includes other updates and also new additions.

Blog Highlights

 

To round out the week, there are a number of blog posts we’d like to highlight.

Wildfly

Wildfly 11 will bring with it a number of changes. Among those changes is integration with Apache ActiveMQ Artemis. Be sure to read the blog for changes and new features available. There’s also support for OpenSSL. The post details setup, security realms, and Elytron all with OpenSSL support! Lastly, Wildfly 11 improves the existing referential integrity found in Wildfly 10.

Spring Boot on Kubernetes

Kamesh Sampath has done a series of posts over on the Red Hat Developer blog detailing configuring Spring Boot on Kubernetes. The introduction of the series covers the initial idea of using Kubernetes for configuration of a Spring Boot application. Part I covers using ConfigMaps for configuration. Part II details the use of Secrets for sensitive information. These are great alternatives to the Spring Config server.

OpenSlava

Lastly, Eric Schabell was at OpenSlava this past week. All of his talks and slides are available on his blog and SlideShare!

 

Thank you, everyone! We hope you’ve had a great week!

Happy Java 9 day! Hope everyone is enjoying a new version of Java and getting used to Jigsaw. Sorry, we missed last week, but we’ll get you all caught up here. Again, our hearts go out to those affected by the natural disasters of the past couple of weeks. We hope you and your loved ones are all safe.

 

Project blogs

 

A number of blogs went out over the past two weeks. Let’s start off by connecting Hawkular services over SSL at the Hawkular blog. We all know microservices are the rage right now. Are you considering breaking up your monolith application into microservices? Christian Posta offers his low-risk migration ideas in a multi-part blog post. JBoss Developer Studio 11 will be releasing sometime in the future, and what better way to get started than by learning how to set up all those services that aren’t installed out of the box? Infinispan blog. You can also get this going on OpenShift!

Travels, Videos, and Presentations

 

We’re fast approaching the conference season for the year! JavaOne is happening at the start of October, JAX London the following week, Devoxx Belgium the first part of November, with QCon San Francisco shortly after that. If you’re attending any of those conferences, be sure to look out for Red Hat! Coming up next week, if you’re a developer using or even trying out Drools, jBPM, or Optaplanner, be sure to put September 26th on your calendar. Drools Days in NYC is happening that day. You can also catch the live stream as well. Two days after that in Washington D.C. will be another event. Lastly, a couple of weeks ago Galder was talking about Big Data with Infinispan. You catch the recording over at YouTube in case you missed it.

Welcome everyone, to another edition of JBoss Weekly! We have some great news to share with you all this week. I hope you’ve stayed current with other happenings out in the Java world over the past couple of weeks, including Mark Reinhold’s blog post about moving Java faster. If you missed that, you can read the whole blog post at https://mreinhold.org/blog/forward-faster.

 

 

People Joining the Team

The Hibernate team had two new additions to the team this past week: Arnold Galovics and Jakub Kubrynski! Welcome to team guys!

 

 

Project blogs

Out in the blogosphere, we have two great blog posts about Keycloak and Hawkular. Keycloak in version 3.3.0.CR1 added support for cross-site replication. More information about this feature and an example of how it is used can be found at the Keycloak blog.

The Hawklar blog discussed alerts and OpenTracing earlier this week. It’s a great read and has an example to follow along with as well.

 

A number of blogs about WildFly went out this week. The first talks about FIPS-compliant credential stores within Wildfly. If you’re storing credentials, it’s certainly worth looking into and making sure you’re compliant with FIPS if you need to be. The next three blog posts talk about the WildFly Elytron project, which is the underlying security subsystem in WildFly 11. Farah Juma discusses using EJBs with Elytron in a two part blog series. Both blog posts have information about getting started started and contain code snippets. Continuing with the Elyton theme, Darran Lofthouse explored using Elytron with Undertow standalone for those times you need something really lightweight.

 

A couple of blogs about jBPM and Drools were released over the past week as well. Tihomir discussed the idea of integrating systems with processes. He talks about how processes are usually done in multiple steps and often require multiple systems. jBPM is a wonderful way to integrate these systems and control the whole process. Read Tihomir’s blog for more information. Next up, Mark Proctor ponders the question of whether optimization is Artificial Intelligence (AI) or Operations Research (OR) in his blog post titled Is Optimization AI or OR?For anyone interested in the field of AI, it’s a very good read with some great references to go even deeper.

 

Travels, Videos, and Presentations

Presentations this past week have been a little slow, but we’re gearing up for JavaOne happening in San Francisco at the start of October. Still, Eric Schabell was out at the Red Hat Forum in Finland earlier in the week. Catch up on his talk and see the slides over on his blog.

Claus Ibsen may have already finished his APAC tour last month, but if you missed him, you can at least see his talk from Melbourne over on his blog.

 

Lastly, if you happened to miss week’s DevNation Live this past week, Galder Zamarreño was presenting about Infinispan. Check it out at the DevNation Live page. While you’re there, sign up to be notified of other DevNation Live events!

We’d also like to share an interview done back in April with Eric at Red Hat Summit:

Releases

Lastly, what would a week at Red Hat Middleware be without some releases? We have you covered, don’t you worry! Arquillian released Universe 1.1.13.7 earlier this week. Read more about the release on the Arquillian website. There’s also a new Drone release: 2.4.2! Again, read all about it on the release page.

 

Wildfly Swarm released version 2017.9.4, yep, you read that right. There were some issues with the releases this time around and they had to burn x.9.0-x.9.3. Regardless, it’s a new release and some new changes, bug fixes, and feature requests. Read about it at the release blog.

Thanks, everyone! To all those experiencing natural disasters this week and into the weekend, our thoughts go out to you all. Stay safe!

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