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Weekly Editorial

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OK so this is an editorial meant to cover many things happening in the JBoss/middleware space for Red Hat. And whilst we'll get to a summary of some of the other things going on in  this space, I wanted to start with a reference to a recent announcement by our xPaaS Product Manager. In this article we're announcing that efforts like Vert.x, WildFly Swarm and even Spring Boot will now also be available on OpenShift. Now I kinda see this as good and there was no intention to give the impression anything else we're doing and have built up a huge user/developer base around, such as EAP or Fuse, is somehow being neglected or reduced in priority. Far from it: the EAP 7 series is a key part of xPaaS and we've worked closely with the OpenShift team to ensure it runs well there. Same goes for other Java stacks, such as Fuse or BRMS/BPMS. But some folks have perhaps read too much between the lines here and think otherwise, so I wanted to take the opportunity to make it clear that enterprise Java, in many varieties of implementation, remains our focus and priority. Whether you're interested in the established approaches such as Java EE or some of the newer efforts, like Vert.x or WildFly Swarm, Red Hat is the home for your (hybrid) cloud deployments.

 

With that said, onwards! Following on from the above, which is also at the heart of our microservices efforts, Bilgin has something to say on the topic as he attempts to apply psychology motivational theories to microservices - and not before time And of course no good microservices effort can ignore OpenShift, so Eric's demo of the new OpenShift 3.4 release is good timing! Now whilst Hawkular Metrics isn't microservice specific, I do expect to see it have a significant positive impact there so you should take a look at Michael's post about Pandas

 

Speaking of the importance of Java EE, as we were earlier, the Community Asylum this time around talks to Gunnar about Bean Validation 2.0. Separately, Ramesh talks about how the 9.2 release of Teiid now supports the SQL-MED specification.

 

Let's finish with some project releases, including JGroups 4.0.0, Keycloak 2.5.4, and Hibernate Search 5.7.0. Another worthy mention is the latest Node.js client release for Infinispan's Hot Rod protocol which supports cross-site client failover!

 

Well that's enough for this week. See you next time!

Image result for abraham lincoln memorialThis past week was the birthday of one of the greatest men in American history.  We can learn alot from great men and women in history.  There are probably not many people, nationally and globally, who have not heard the 16th US Presidents name.  Abraham Lincoln, February 12, 1809 – April 15, 1865, was an American politician and lawyer who served as the 16th US President from March 1861 until his assassination in April,1865.  Lincoln led the United States through the US Civil War.  He preserved the Union, strengthened the federal government, and modernized the economy.  The Lincoln memorial is a great place to visit in Washington, DC.  His most famous speech, The Gettysburg Address, is inscribed at the memorial.  Excerpts include,

 

..conceived in Liberty, and dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal...

....and that government of the people, by the people, for the people, shall not perish from the earth.

 

This coming week the US honors the Presidents with the Presidents Day Federal Holiday, February 20th.  

 

 

 

Now on to the happenings in our open source community!

 

Releases

 

 

 

The Past Weeks Highlights

 

 

Thanks for being a part of the JBoss Community and stay tuned for the next Weekly Editorial!

 

Kenneth Peeples, Shadow-Soft Director of Technical Services

kpeeples@shadow-soft.com

@ossmentor

www.shadow-soft.com

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Welcome back everyone! We’ve been busy this past week. A number of new releases have been completed this past week, a considerable amount of news, and all topped with a generous amount of content to boost your programming chops! We’ll dive in first with the new releases, follow-up with news, then look at the other content.

 

Releases

 

There were nine releases last week! We’re really tearing it up out there with the release trains. Projects seeing releases this past week include Byteman, Wildfly Swarm, Hibernate Search and Validator, Teiid, and Hawkular Services. Listed below you can see the various release blog announcements below.

News

 

Some very exciting things happened last week, and our engineers were there to capture and blog about it!

First up is CDI 2.0, which is now in Public Review. Go through and read all the changes and how it will change CDI in this next version.

Eric Schabell and many others, possibly including you, have received acceptances to Red Hat Summit 2017. You can read about what Eric will be talking about in his blog entry: Upcoming Red Hat Summit session

A couple of entries from the Hawkular universe came in last week. Hawkular APM: Comparing performance of service versions discusses how you can compare the performance of different versions of a service as part of a continuous deployment pipeline. Display custom events in Grafana discusses using and displaying Grafana Annotations as points in time on your charts.

In a blog post and demo, Windup 3.0 for Eclipse IDE, Ondrej Zizka showcases the Windup 3.0 eclipse plugin. It’s still in development but is progressing along nicely. Lastly, and somewhat off the beaten path, Martin Sebor recaps his ISO C meeting that happened in October: Trip Report: October WG14 Meeting. For those doing development in C, you’ll want to read up about work being done in C11 and also a review of proposals for C2X, the next "major" revision of C.

Tricks of the Trade

 

Every week, the JBoss community releases some new software, but a lot of those releases are often framework or just bricks of more complex software (on this note, surprisingly, not Arquillian related release this week, for instance!). But this last week was different, because most of the releases where about products. Software you can run and deploy - and more importantly, use to implement solution to your problem. So, with new releases for Infinispan, Teiid, Keycloak, and even Windup, I'm calling it : it's raining (good) software !

 

Evangelist's Corner

 

As always, the JBoss evangelist have been busy releasing interesting content in the last days. The ever prolific Eric D. Schabell wrote an interesting article on how to add complex business logic to processes with JBoss BPM, but also took some time to discuss the upcoming Devoxx France 2017: Ready for AppDev, Cloud and a Circus? And while on the topic of BPM & BRMS, an excellent technical article on how the KIE Server Router integrated with workbench has also been released.

 

On her side, Christina Lin discussed Applying API Best Practices in Fuse on the RHD Blog. Given the importance of API, and their importance, in ensuring that business runs smoothly, it is most definitely a crucial topic.

 

Explore new territories with Infinispan & Keycloak

 

Last week saw the release of both new Infinispan version (with Infinispan 9.0.0.Beta2 and 8.2.6.Final are out!) and Keycloak (Keycloak 2.5.1.Final Released), but also the release of a couple of interesting articles discussing their new feature or architecture changes. The first one is actually the second part of an ongoing article regarding Data Container Changes in Infinispan (Part 2). Just behind this one, an other article covers the JDBC Store Improvements made in Infinispan 9.x. On the Keycloak side of the action, Administer Keycloak server from shell with Admin CLI was released, documenting quite neatly how to managed and automate easily, regular operation - such as creating use or changing a password, with a Keycloak server.

 

Technical bytes

 

On top of the previous articles, there was two noteworthy articles released last week. The first one discussed how to use Vert.x conjointly to AMQP to Build services and APIs (Vert.x, AMQP). The other one is actually a series of articles, as this is the now regular Hibernate Community Newsletter 2/2017. If you have any interest in a project (or several) from the Hibernate community, this newsletter is going to be a treasure trove for you.

 

Releases, releases, releases...

 

As mentioned above, there was certainly some very interesting releases last week - not just update of frameworks, but releases of products - so a lot of things to look at and explore :

 

Decaf'


As always, after binging on Java for a little while, it also nice to get one head out of coffee cup, and take a look at what is happening around it. So, for the JavaScript enthusiasts out there, I'm pretty sure the following article on  Data Encapsulation vs. Immutability in Javascript – RHD Blog will be a treat ! If you are more into Docker these days - who is not ? - take a look at how ManageIQ might make your life easier :Container Images Compliance – what we built at ManageIQ to remove a security pain point – part 1 – RHD Blog

Welcome to another edition of the JBoss Weekly Editorial, our regular trek through the JBoss Communities to catch up with their news

 

Microservices are Here to Stay

 

With many applications moving towards Microservices architectures we are seeing an explosion in the number of services being developed and deployed, something proving hard to manage with our pre-existing tools and techniques.  In order to handle these new architectures we need to begin looking at alternative environments especially Cloud Native Platforms, such as Kubernetes, which are better suited to handle the deployment and management of these services with minimal interaction.

 

Having explored  the environment and tooling  needed to support Microservices  it is time to focus on how we adapt our existing processes and applications.  Eric was recently invited to give a presentation entitled "Using Containers to Build a Microservices Architecture" in which he concentrates on the journey you will follow when switching over to Microservices, his slides are now available and a recording of his presentation can also be obtained by signing up to the event.

 

The next problem you will likely face when deploying Microservices relates to the monitoring of those services and collation of the metrics, a task greatly complicated by the number of services being deployed and the distribution of those services over many nodes.  To address this requirement the Hawkular team have introduced the Hawkular OpenShift Agent, an infrastructural service responsible for monitoring all the pods deployed on each node and sending metrics to Hawkular Metrics.  Hawkular OpenShift Agent is not the only option for providing metrics however as Hawkular Metrics can integrate with other tools such as Dropwizard Metrics, a popular metrics framework used within java applications.

 

Bean Validation 2.0 Progress

 

JSR 380, the Bean Validation 2.0 Spec, began its journey through the JCP a few months ago however there has already been significant progress.  With a focus on updating the existing specification to take advantage of Java 8 features the Expert Group has begun its work by adding support for JSR 310, the Data and Time API, and taking advantage of the additional locations for annotations to enhance the validation of Collections and other containers.  Gunnar Morling, the Red Hat representative on the committee, has more information on these new features and where the EG is heading next.

 

Pluggable Task Assignments with jBPM 7

 

Nearly all Business Processes will, at some point, involve user interactions and the assignment of tasks to ensure the job is completed however there are numerous options for how this assignment can be handled.  Tasks are traditionally assigned to a specific actor, multiple actors or groups however each has their issues.  In order to better handle this situation  jBPM 7 also provides a pluggable mechanism for handling task assignment along with two potential strategies which can be used.  Maciej has more information for those of you who are interested in learning more about the benefits of this approach and some of the issues you may face if using traditional assignment.

 

New Releases

 

 

Thank you for joining me in this week's Editorial, please come back next week when we will bring you more updates from the JBoss Communities.

I am looking forward to a great 2017 with the JBoss Community Projects and Red Hat Products.  As always the community continues to provide great technologies and projects.  This week provided some great Releases and Articles.

 

Now on to the happenings in our open source community!

 

Releases

 

  • Hibernate Validator 5.4.0.CR1 Provides some improvements and fixes:
    • We improved the javax.money support with a new annotation @Currency
    • Marko Bekhta finished his work on the annotation processor: we are now on a par with the Hibernate Validator engine features
    • We also fixed a possible overflow issue in java.time validation reported by Stanislav Bashkyrtsev
  • Immutant 2.1.6 includes the following changes:
    • Update to Ring 1.5.1 to address a security vulnerability. This vulnerability only affects applications that are running from the filesytem, not from an uberjar or war, so most users aren't affected.
    • Remove our dependency on Potemkin. This was a common source of collision with other application dependencies, so we now use an internal copy of Potemkin under different namespaces so it doesn't conflict.
    • A minor update of the version of tools.nrepl on which we depend (0.2.11 -> 0.2.12)

  • Arquillian Cube Extension 1.0.0.Alpha16 includes alot of enhancements and bugfixes.

  • Byteman 4.0.0-BETA2 is a early access release for JDK 9
  • Hybernate Search 5.5.6.Final contains alot of bugfixes
  • Teiid 9.2 Beta1 includes highlights since Alpha2:
    • TEIID-4627 Source Triggers to handle source change events.
    • TEIID-4643 Encrypt/decrypt functions were added for 128bit AES.
  • Arquillian Core 1.1.12.Final includes dependency updates and some improvements
  • Arquillian Tomcat Container 1.0.0.CR9 contains Arquillian Tomcat Adapters

 

Business Processes and Rules Highlights

 

 

Fuse Highlights

 

  • Christina Lin shared her recommendations on API best practices:
    • Intuitive-  It must be easy to understand and use without documentations.
    • Stable-  Not only it should be running but with good performance too.
    • Demands -  Creating useful functionally, no matter how nicely your API is documented, how easy it is to use, it people don't need it, they won't call it.
  • Claus Ibsen shared a podcast from Java Pub House posted on 7th of January 2017 where Freddy Guime and Bob Hollin talk about Apache Camel.

 

Additional Highlights

 

 

Thanks for being a part of the JBoss Community and stay tuned for the next Weekly Editorial!

 

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Kenneth Peeples, Shadow-Soft Director of Technical Services

kpeeples@shadow-soft.com

@ossmentor

www.shadow-soft.com

To those of you in a geography that recently incremented its year counter: Happy New Year! This week much of the JBoss community is returning refreshed from the holiday break. And on their return we've seen the usual flurry of releases and useful tutorials and demos...

 

Getting Started with Fuse Integration Service 2.0 Tech preview

In this post Christina Lin walks us through the steps needed to get started with Fuse Integration Service 2.0 (Tech preview). There’s even a video to make it easier to follow along.

 

App Dev in the Cloud - HR Employee Rewards Application on OpenShift

In this Blog post, Eric presents an update to his "HR Employee Rewards Application” demo application. In this update he’s fully containerized the application and shown how it can be ran on the OpenShift Container Platform.

 

Releases

starwars.jpg

This has been a tough year for the passing of some great actors and actresses.  On December 27th "Princess Leia" passed away, and her mom, Debbie Reynolds, passed away the day after.  I was 9 years old when Star Wars came out and have enjoyed the movie franchise since the moment I saw Carrie Fisher.  About 30 years separated the releases of Return of the Jedi and the Force Awakens, but it was well worth the wait.  I think Mark Hamill said it perfectly, Carrie was one-of-a-kind who belonged to us all- whether she liked it or not. She was OUR Princess, darn it, & the actress who played her blurred into one gorgeous, fiercely independent & ferociously funny, take-charge woman who took our collective breath away. Determined & tough, but with a vulnerability that made you root for her & want her to succeed & be happy. Carrie will be in Episode VIII and it will be interesting to see how they handle her absence in Episode IX.  Carrie, Thanks for taking our breath away on and off the big screen! 

 

 

Now on to the happenings in our open source community!

 

Releases

 

Apache Camel

 

Vert.x

 

Thanks for being a part of the JBoss Community and stay tuned for the next Weekly Editorial!

shadowsoft-logo.png

Kenneth Peeples, Shadow-Soft Director of Technical Services

kpeeples@shadow-soft.com

@ossmentor

www.shadow-soft.com

 

Holiday season have officially started and we certainly wish you are all off to your familly and friends - if you actually are, please, stop reading this, close your phone or laptop and pay attention to your relatives for once ! Have a merry christmas !!!

 

Coffee Shop Christmas Village

 

Microservices are commodity

 

Before jumping into some in-depth, technical articles, let's take a short step back, and look at things from higher vintage point with this excellent article on Microservices are Commodity.

 

Riding a camel for Xmas ?

 

Camel are certainly not the first animal one associates with Christmas, but this should certainly prevent anyone to enjoy this cool article on Camel Live Reload of XML routes. An if you are looking for more in depth information on Camel itself, you probably want to check out the Status of Camel in Action 2nd edition book. Or, if not, at least take a peak, at this article on Red Hat JBoss Fuse - Automate integration CI/CD processes. In any case, after that, you'll be ready to cross any desert...

 

Techbytes - Treat yourself a Xmas gift - dwelve into Infinispan 

 

As the holiday season generally means finally a bit of time to do some long due exploring of some cool, new technologies, so the Infinispan and the Hawkuler one have both though of you, and released some pretty neat articles. On the Infinispan side, a first article, Infinispan: Spring Boot Starters, walk you through setting up Infinispan as part of a Spring Boot app - certainly an efficient way to start using Infinispan, if you are already familliar with Spring Boot (otherwise, did you heard of JBoss Forge ? ).

if you are already an Infinispan user, the second article might be more up your alley. It's a more in depth introduce some major changes, coming in 9.0 : Data Container Changes Part 1. Be prepare for the next big thing coming in Infinispan !

 

Fiddle for Drools and CLI for Hawkular

 

If you, like me, have to play around with Drools on a regular basis, i'm pretty sure you'll find this nugget very useful: Introducing the new Drools Fiddle. Along those lines, a brief introduction to a pretty neat CLI tool for Hawkular - Hawkinit will probably be equally useful(ok, i'm partial, I just love CLI tools...).

 

Releases, releases, releases...

 

As always, the JBoss Community projects have released many new version - especially a first CR for Keycloak 2.5 and for an exciting new version of Hibernate Search using Elasticsearch !

 

 

Decaf'

 

Already to jittery for Java ? Time for something else ? Well, then I could not pass anyway this opportunity to mention this article from last week describing

How to get started with Microsoft SQL Server on Red Hat Enterprise Linux ! SQL Server on Linux ? Aren't we living interesting times !

 

Also, a bit more closer to the Java root of the JBoss Community, the third part of a very interesting series about using Red Hat JBoss Data Virtualization on OpenShift: Part 3 – Data federation. Certainly take a look at it, especially if you are not familiar with JBoss Data Virtualization (or its Open Source pendant, Teiid). It think it may pick your interest...

 

https://developers.redhat.com/blog/2016/12/14/red-hat-jboss-data-virtualization-on-openshift-part-3-data-federation/

Welcome to another edition of the JBoss Weekly Editorial! We are excited to bring you another packed week of JBoss and Red Hat Middleware news. The end of the year is nearly here, but that doesn’t mean we’re slowing down.

Releases

Let’s start with the new bits during the week, shall we?

Teiid continues to move closer to it’s 9.2 release with 9.2 Alpha2. Hashing functions, including md5, sha1, sha2-256 and sha2-512 have been added along with a number of issues being closed with this release. Just over 70 issues have been closed on the road to the 9.2 release currently slated for early to mid February.

Wildfly Swarm has recently released version 2016.12.1. A number of issues have been closed with this release including improvements to UberJar and war cleaning, fewer boot-time warnings, significant improvements to Windows support and JavaDocs! Wildfly Swarm is a slimmed down version of Wildfly Java Application Server for use with Microservices.

Changes to the JDK9 have necessitated another release of Byteman. Andrew Dinn released version 4.0.0-BETA1 earlier this week addressing those changes. Byteman is an invaluable tool for tracing, monitoring and testing Java application JDK runtime code.

On the product side of things, Red Hat Single Sign-on recently released version 7.1 Beta. Included in Red Hat Single Sign-on are features for OpenID connect, Red Hat JBoss Fuse integration, a Node.JS client adapter, SSSD integration, user storage SPI and more! If you’re in need of an SSO solution, look no further.

Notable Blog Entries

This past week includes a number of notable blogs done by the community.

To kick things off, Jason Green blogged about Jigsaw’s Missing Pieces. He includes links to the various issues in the OpenJDK project. Jason breaks down the "missing pieces" into three categories: Reflection issues, dynamic introduction and alteration of modules, and interoperability with alternative module system. He remains hopeful suitable solutions can be found and implemented.

Next, we have Ken Finnigan’s post about whether to WAR or JAR with Wildfly Swarm. Ken briefly describes how to obtain a JAR and a WAR using Maven. He also discusses pros and cons of both approaches. The recommended approach is to us a war with Wildfly Swarm, however, that isn’t a hard rule.

Juraci Paixão Kröhling talked about the recent improvements to Hawkular APM for OpenShift this week. He included steps to get everything setup on Fedora 25. There are also examples to follow along that Juraci mentions!

Vlad Mihalcea discusses what has happened within the Hibernate Community recently in his Hibernate Community Newsletter post. There are many blogs, issues, releases and Q&A posts he links to and are well worth the read if any of them apply to your particular Hibernate usage.

Back in November a number of Red Hat employees spoke at Devoxx Morocco. Galder Zamarreño recapped his trip to Morocco and Geneva over on the Infinispan blog. Galder spoke about building reactive applications using Infinispan, Node.js and Elm.

To round out the Java related news, John Clingan wrote about MicroProfile being adopted into the Eclipse community. MicroProfile has moved quickly since it was announced back in June at DevNation. If you’re interested in joining the discussion, head over to the forums.

Todd Mancini has a somewhat lengthy, but concise blog post about porting .NET Framwork to .NET Core. You’ll want to read through that if you’re currently thinking about migrating to .NET core, or even using it for the first time!

Lastly this week, we have a piece written by Takayoshi Tanaka about getting started with Microsoft SQL Server on Red Hat Enterprise Linux. Microsoft has a simple seven step install document which Tanaka-san builds upon. He describes how to connect to the database using Visual Studio Code, Visual Studio and the command line.

We’ve had a fantastic week here at Red Hat and are looking forward to another one coming up!

 

With the end of the year coming you may be forgiven for thinking we would be winding down but the communities are amazing places full of amazing people as can be seen in this week's edition of the JBoss Editorial.

 

JBoss Data Virtualisation

 

Following the recent release of the JBoss Data Virtualisation image on OpenShift, completing the initial move of our current Middleware products in to the cloud, Cojan has begun a series of articles demonstrating the capabilities of the product and how to use them within the OpenShift environment.  In the first article of the series Cojan takes everyone through the steps necessary to deploy the image on OpenShift, from the installation of vagrant and the Container Development Kit through to the first deployment of JDV.  In the second article Cojan introduces us to the concept of a Virtual Database and explains how it can be exposed as a service using the OData protocol.

 

Of course we have not forgotten about those of you running JDV on your own machines!  Madou has an article showing how MySQL/MariaDB can be integrated with JDV in order to expose the contents of your databases.

 

Infinispan Integration, Streaming and Querying

 

The Infinispan project have also been busy this week, not only have they announced their first Beta of Infinispan 9 (see below) but they have another three published articles.

 

In the first article of the week Gustavo walks us through the necessary steps for using Oracle JDBC Cache store, covering the configuration of Infinispan and how to orchestrate the deployment with docker-compose.  The second article, written by William, discusses the Distributed Stream capabilities and the usability improvements which have been introduced in Infinispan 9 while the final article, written by Adrian, introduces Ickle, the new Query Language being introduced in to Infinispan.

 

Messaging in Cloud and at Speed

 

The standard deployment of A-MQ within OpenShift assumes the server is being provisioned for use by other deployments with access to the same project however sometimes you want to allow access from an external client.  If this is a scenario you are interested in then take a look at Michelle's article where she demonstrates how to expose the internal service to an external client.

 

When using messaging systems you will often be faced with a trade-off, a decision to relax the full guarantees of writing to disk for improved performance.  Artemis allows you to make the same trade off, allowing you to reach a speed of 50K persistent messages per second on a laptop with a delay of only a few milliseconds before the messages are persisted.

 

Garbage Collection in the VM

 

For many of us developing on the JVM we have come to trust the default Garbage Collection settings will be sufficient for our applications but what happens when your applications are pushing harder on the VM?  How do you tune the GC behaviour?  In the first article of a series discussing the GC, Matt Robson takes us through the role of the G1 (Garbage First) collector and how it works.

 

Kie Server Routing

 

One of the challenges faced by kie server clients has been the requirement to track the location of the servers being used and which kjars are running on them.  With the introduction of the Kie Server Router we now have a single service against which we can invoke requests, allowing it to handle the routing to the correct kie server instance and the aggregation of requests spanning multiple servers.

 

Hibernate News

 

The latest version of the Hibernate Newsletter is out bringing news from the community.  Within the newsletter you will find interviews with developers along with articles discussing Apache Ignite, streaming vs pagination, integrating with Camel, multi-tenancy and much more.

 

DevNation 2017 Call for Papers

 

DevNation 2017 will be taking place in Boston, alongside Red Hat Summit, from May 2nd to May 4th.  The call for papers is still open but will be closing soon, the current deadline is Friday 16th December.

 

OptaPlanner and the US Election

 

With the recent US Presidential election being in the news Geoffrey started to wonder what would be the lowest number of votes required for a candidate to win the election, naturally this is a constraint violation problem and something he knows about .  With this as his goal Geoffrey began working with OptaPlanner and created a model to determine an answer that may surprise many of you!

 

Camel Maven Plugin Donated to Apache

 

At the beginning of this year Claus wrote an article presenting a new Camel Maven Plugin which could parse your source code and validate endpoints.  After nearly a year of work the plugin has stabilised and is now being donated to the Apache Camel project.

 

JBoss Out and About

 

Heiko was recently invited to GrafanaCon 2016 where he gave a presentation on Hawkular.

 

New Releases

 

 

Join us again next week when we will bring you the latest crop of news from across the JBoss Communities.

Welcome to this week's editorial. Even though it's the week after thanksgiving the JBoss Community still has a bunch of interesting developments to report on.

 

Should we Remove MongoDB from Keycloak?

The Keycloak team are considering the removal of support for MongoDB backed KeyCloak servers. Among other reasons, they cite lack of support for transactional updates to multiple documents in MongoDB, as a major contributing factor. However, elsewhere in the JBoss Community there is work afoot to bring non-ACID transactional support to MongoDB. As is typical in the JBoss community, they are seeking feedback before taking the plunge. See this blog post for the reasons to make this change and instructions on how you can join the discussion.

 

Node.js DNS Module and Debugger Explanations

Lucas Holmquist continues his exploration of Node.js modules and features. This week he explains how the DNS Module works and how to use the Node.js debugger.

 

Improvements Around using Infinispan with Spring

If you are using Infinispan with Spring, be sure to read about the improvements the team are making around this integration.

 

How to run JBoss BPM Suite in a Container

In this post Eric Schabell explains how to run JBoss BPM Suite in a Container using either the Openshift Container Platform (OCP) or the Red Hat Container Development Kit (CDK).

 

Releases

  • Hibernate Search 5.6.0.Beta4. Bringing the latest bugfixes and previously missing features for the experimental Elasticsearch integration. This is the version to use with Hibernate ORM versions 5.0.x and 5.1.x.
  • Hibernate Search 5.7.0.Beta1. Bringing the exact same changes as 5.6.0.Beta1, but on top of the compatibility with Hibernate ORM version 5.2.x that was introduced with 5.7.0.Alpha1.
  • Windup suport in Eclipse IDE. A new plugin for Eclipse bringing which marks migration issues in application code, provides help to fix issues, and offers automated code replacement where possible.

OK so many of our American friends and colleagues will probably be slowly digesting their turkey dinners so this is a great time to give you and them something to read. Let's start with a bang!

 

Screen Shot 2016-11-25 at 13.23.18.png

 

Yes, the Ceylon team have released 1.3.1 which, as this blog recounts, is much more than a micro release! You should definitely got and check out the article and the release itself.

 

Next up, and Ceylon has a play here as it's also available on OpenShift, is the recent xPaaS announcement around Data Virtualization. This marks an important milestone for our products on OpenShift, where we have containerized runtimes of all our Middleware solutions available for our customers, while we continue to evolve the experience around using the products. That means that today our customers and prospects can run:

 

  • JBoss EAP 6 and 7,
  • JBoss Web Server (Tomcat),
  • JBoss Data Grid,
  • Red Hat Single-sign-on,
  • JBoss BRMS decision server
  • JBoss BPMS intelligent process server
  • JBoss Fuse Integration Services
  • JBoss A-MQ and
  • JBoss Data Virtualization.

 

And we're not only just 'making these products available on OpenShift'. As important as enabling the products for such a scenario, we manage the lifecycle of all the dependencies for those products, and that greatly reduces the operational burden that traditional middleware imposes. Congrats to all of the teams involved!

 

On to the rest of the week and we've seen lots of projects release. These include Keycloak, Hibernate Validator, Hibernate ORM, WindUp and Forge. Finally, one important article to shine a light on is Claus' trip report from his adventures at ApacheCon (and this time his luggage appears to have gotten there and back without incident!) Some nice photos as well!

 

OK, that'll do for now. Plenty to read about while that turkey digests! See you next time!

Greetings to all and welcome to this new edition of the JBoss Weekly Editorial. This new editorial is published one week after the end of the Devoxx event, one week after the election of Donald Trump but also one week after many news that you will discover hereafter.

 

Administrate jBPM more easily

 

Middleware solutions like many products must deal with situations which are sometimes not taken into consideration when a project is designed. This is particularly the case when we have to manage Business Processes as tasks/processes could be assigned to persons which are not working anymore for a company, have moved to another department, .... Hopefully, the new version of jBPM 7.0 offers an Administration Api in order to handle more easily such use cases as described by Maciej Swiderski in its article.

 

Roadmap of BRMS/BPMS & co (event)

 

When we design a solution for a middleware project in a company, it is very important & critical to select the right technology but also to have a good visibility about how the technology will evolve over the next months.

Hopefully, Marc Proctor (co-creator of Drools) , Kris Verlaenen (jBPM), Mauricio Salatino (Cloud capabilities of BRMS/BPMS), Geoffrey Desmet (OptaPlanner) & Max Barkley (Errai) will share their visions and roadmap during this Skillsmatter event scheduled the 22nd of November in London. Some seats are still available.

 

Collect Trace using Javascript API with Hawkular APM

 

As you probably knows, the Hawkular project participates to the OpenTracing initiative in order to provide Java solution supporting the OpenTracing Standard and distributed tracing which is fundamental to design decent Microservices Architectures. The project has been enriched with a new library for Javascript development which allows to setup a tracer and send requests. If you want more information about this new API and how to use it using node.js, I invite you to have a look to the publication of Pavol Loffay.

Remark : For those which are curious to see how to use Hawkular top of OpenShift in order to collect such traces, metrics using a Go Feed client here is a short 10min demo !

 

Decompose your Database

 

Last week at Devoxx, Edson Yanaga has presented during its talk different strategies to decompose an existing monolithic database into shards, multiple databases, schemas but also how the migration process could take place. The perfect tool, demonstrated by Yanaga, is Debezium and it will help you to capture from an existing database the data changes as streams in order to design your Microservice connected to a backend. A new release of Debezium is out & provides new great features as by example the ability to use with multi-master MySQL servers as sources. You can discover this new release here as presented by Randall Hauch.

 

Releases, release, releases ....

 

 

I hope this weekly editorial has provided you with something of interest, please join us again next week when we will bring you more news from JBoss and the JBoss Communities.

Greetings to all and welcome to this new edition of the JBoss Weekly Editorial. While this issue is filled with news, I was a caught unprepared by the lack of the "main items" to report from last week. However, the more time I spent preparing this issue, the more I realized that, in fact, last week is the perfect embodiement of a week in the JBoss Community: no fuss no muss, just cool stuff coming out !

 

Techbytes

To my own admission, I am a "command line guy", and even more a "Shell guy" (I even wrote articles on Shell on a regular basis). So, of course, the most exciting news for me this week, was this nice article describing how to Registering new clients for Keycloak from shell ! Also, on the command line front is worth mentioning here the new release of  JBoss Forge 3.3.3 - the command line tool to help you generate your app project layout. Check those out !

 

But, rest assure, if you are more about high level issue and programming solution for business, I'm sure the following article on Drools & jBPM: Drools 7 to support DMN (Decision Model and Notation) will also quench your thirst !

 

Community and events

First of all, if you like Infinispan and are either living in Morocco or going to Devoxx Morocco, don't miss Infinispan coming to Devoxx Morocco! Also  last week was published an interview with a long time contributor to Hibernate: Meet Thorben Janssen. Certainly worth a read if one wants to understand better the dynamics of the JBoss community...

 

Javascript corner

While the JBoss community is still heavily Java-based, there is a lot of interest and integration with other languages - and of course, the first one certainly being JavaScript for obvious reasons. So you may be interested in this feedback regarding new feature introduced in NPM: Prepublish changes, or this breakdown on Promise Rejection Handling (with Node.js).

 

Releases, releases, releases

 

As always, last week saw a set of project releases - check them out !

 

 

Decaf'

 

If you want to stroll a bit outside the Java world, I strongly recommend you the reading of Nick Strugnell's article on SOE on the Open Source Architect blog. The acronyms SOE stands for Standard Operating Environement, and is (to make it short) an approach to handle large servers that have been pushed by Red Hat to its customers for years now. This approach is far from being "out of date" as it forms a strong prerequiste to a move to a DevOps. If any of those topics interest you, have a look, I'm pretty sure you won't regret it !

 

(Sidenote: look a all week without news related to Docker !   Is the world falling apart ???)

 

Hopefully you have found something in this week's editorial to pique your interest and give you something to explore while waiting for next week's installment.  Join us here next week for more news from the JBoss Community.