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Weekly Editorial

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Running software in the clouds have been an essential topic of our industry for almost a decade now. While it used to be reserved to the cutting-edge, experimental and adventurous projects, it has been, in the last years, adopted largely by the industry. In this context, it is quite exciting to see all the news of last weeks surrounding the topic within the JBoss Community...

clouds

10 Steps to Cloud Happiness

 

If you have lived under a rock for the past decade, you may have no idea about cloud infrastructure - or maybe you never ended up using one. This editorial focuses a lot on cloud, so maybe you can take a look, at first, at the 10 steps tutorial started by Eric D.Schabell last week ?

 

 

Best way into the Clouds - OpenShift

Well, this might only be my opinion - so feel free to disagree - but I do think OpenShift is one of the best ways to get into a cloud infrastructure. And there was quite a lot of nifty informations about it released last week. First of all this pretty interesting article on JBoss A-MQ on OpenShift Cheat Sheet, will certainly help you manage your favorite MoM on a OpenShift container.

To go further down the road, you may even want to explore how to properly maintain your own images in OpenShift, than this first installment of a series of articles on Container Images for OpenShift (Part 1: Objectives) will certainly reveals itself to be an excellent starting point.

 

Last, but certainly not the least, an announcement from Red Hat and Alibaba, just yesterday, shows how much traction Cloud is having in our industry : Red Hat and Alibaba Cloud Join Forces to Bring Increased Flexibility with Open Source.

Eclipse - Java Tooling for the Sky

 

As much as cloud infrastructure is bringing easiness of deployment and scalable performance to your (Java) application, one still needs to write and design a resilient and robust application, not to mention the increasing need for the app to be as secure as possible against the many hacking threats out there.

Fortunately, the Eclipse project keeps enhancing the IDE, enabling us, developers, to write better apps. If you doubt, just take an eye at this article on Java code coverage in Eclipse! I'm pretty sure you never thought of using code coverage this way.... It is also nice to see the integration of Fuse technologies within Eclipse is making progress as shown by the following article: Fuse development environment with Development Suite installer.

If you are excited by the new evolution or the future of the IDE, you should definitely join other members of the JBoss community, along with some Red Hat Developers at EclipseCon Europe on the 24th and 25th of October in Ludwigsburg, near Stuttgart, in Germany.

 

Hibernation season has started

 

Despite the actual meaning of its name, the Hibernate community has also been very active and keeping up with what is happening within the projects. It would require a separate article to cover it all! Fortunately, last week saw the release of the Hibernate Community Newsletter 19/2017 , so you just this need to check this out to get updated, and to make your user experience even smoother, the Hibernate websites get a facelift!

 

Techbytes

 

Of course, not everything things is about cloud. As always, the JBoss community having been working on numerous projects and keep offering improvements of all sort to their users. For instance, Apache Camel fans will be very happy to read (more) about Apache Camel route coverage tooling on the way. Or maybe you would like to learn how to set up Hawkular Alerts in ManageIQ? Or rather how to Run an Embedded WildFly Host Controller in the CLI?

 

See, plenty of advanced materials there, but maybe you crave learning new things, rather than delve into complex topics. So, what about Getting started with workbench and KIE server on 7.3 (and onwards)?

 

Also, any Java developer will be interested in knowing what is coming with the JDK 9 release, so let's take a look at this Overview of the New JDK 9 Release.

 

Hopefully, you have found something in this week's editorial to pique your interest and give you something to explore while waiting for next week's installment. Join us here next week for more news from the JBoss Community.

Welcome back to another weekly editorial! Those of you catching up from JavaOne, we hope you found time to visit the booth and try out OpenShift.io! There are a number of posts to cover this week, so, let’s get started.

Releases

 

We’ll start out with releases this time. There’s only three of them this week, but that doesn’t mean we’ve slacked off.

Announcements

 

By far the biggest announcement in the Java EE space happened earlier in the week with the announcement of EE4J! Our very own Mark Little blogged about it. If this is the first you’re seeing of it, be sure to read Mark’s blog and check out the charter. Everyone is welcome to participate. Please sign up for the mailing list and help us all move Enterprise Java forward!

If you’re running on RHEL, you may be excited for the next couple of blogs from Mike Guerette. Earlier in the week, Red Hat announced the availability of Red Hat Developer Toolset 7.0 Beta. This beta brings updates to GCC (7.2) and adds Clang/LLVM 4.0.1, Go 1.8.3, and Rust 1.2.0 to the list of supported compilers! In addition to those, Mike also announced Red Hat Software Collections 3.0 Beta which includes other updates and also new additions.

Blog Highlights

 

To round out the week, there are a number of blog posts we’d like to highlight.

Wildfly

Wildfly 11 will bring with it a number of changes. Among those changes is integration with Apache ActiveMQ Artemis. Be sure to read the blog for changes and new features available. There’s also support for OpenSSL. The post details setup, security realms, and Elytron all with OpenSSL support! Lastly, Wildfly 11 improves the existing referential integrity found in Wildfly 10.

Spring Boot on Kubernetes

Kamesh Sampath has done a series of posts over on the Red Hat Developer blog detailing configuring Spring Boot on Kubernetes. The introduction of the series covers the initial idea of using Kubernetes for configuration of a Spring Boot application. Part I covers using ConfigMaps for configuration. Part II details the use of Secrets for sensitive information. These are great alternatives to the Spring Config server.

OpenSlava

Lastly, Eric Schabell was at OpenSlava this past week. All of his talks and slides are available on his blog and SlideShare!

 

Thank you, everyone! We hope you’ve had a great week!

With the release of the new Start Trek TV series, I hope the reader will pardon me for this (not so) inspired title... Nevertheless, JavaOne is coming up and the JBoss Community is getting ready for it !!!

 

JavaOne

As you are certainly aware, JavaOne is coming up soon and, of course, many member of the JBoss community are participating to the event. Namely, this week, some of them start announcing their presence, like Narayana team at JavaOne or Clément Escoffier teaser for his presentation on The Reactive Landscape.

 

Pimp your JBoss Developer Studio - and then explore BPM & Rules !

Last week, Eric D. Schabell took the time to make a coupl of blog entries regarding the JBoss Developer Studio (an Eclipse based IDE). Especially he focused on how to set up tooling for some important project of the community within the IDE:

 

Once you have those tool properly installed, you will be all set to follow the 4 hours presentation, from last week, on Processes, Rules and Events: Watch Drools, jBPM and Optaplanner Day LIVE (Sept 26)  !


Expanding your Horizon

 

An Open Source community as thriving as the one of JBoss produces a lot of software, tool, and products to learn and try out. And when I mean a lot, I mean, like, a LOT.  It may be difficult to explore, follow and learn all of them, and this is why, I'm happy to see that many things happened last week to help one exactly do that.

 

So, first, and this is a great news, the Camel in Action 2nd edition goes into production phase ! The announcement also includes some preview on the book content, so go check it out. Then comes Hibernate, that has become its own community of project within JBoss. Which makes it obviously a bit challenging to follow. Thankfully,  last week was released the Hibernate Community Newsletter 18/2017  which will caught you up on anything you may have missed !

 

Of course, there is almost no better way to learn than to be teached by the greatest. Especially when the greatest happens to be also an excellent teacher like Bela Ban. Indeed, Bela has announced a new series of JGroups workshops in Rome and Berlin in November. Having personally attended

his workshop a couple of times, I can but only strongly recommend it. You will learn everything you ever wanted to know about JGroups - and more !

 

Techbytes

 

After all this learning, and the all the upcoming exciting content coming up with JavaOne, you may want to scratch a (technical) hitch and play with some new tech. No worries, an Eclipse Vert.x Gradle Plugin tutorial might be just the fix you need. If not, take a look at how to Add Kerberos Authentication To Existing Web Application.

 

Releases, releases, releases...

 

 

Decaf'

 

Enough is enough ! You don't want to fire Eclipse, neither to debug some Java program, you need something else for a change ? You might be just in luck, because last week was released a very nice article on Ansible - A handy tool for people that might not need it. And being a big fan of Ansible, I can but only advise one to go read it...

 

Hopefully, you have found something in this week's editorial to pique your interest and give you something to explore while waiting for next week's installment. Join us here next week for more news from the JBoss Community.

Happy Java 9 day! Hope everyone is enjoying a new version of Java and getting used to Jigsaw. Sorry, we missed last week, but we’ll get you all caught up here. Again, our hearts go out to those affected by the natural disasters of the past couple of weeks. We hope you and your loved ones are all safe.

 

Project blogs

 

A number of blogs went out over the past two weeks. Let’s start off by connecting Hawkular services over SSL at the Hawkular blog. We all know microservices are the rage right now. Are you considering breaking up your monolith application into microservices? Christian Posta offers his low-risk migration ideas in a multi-part blog post. JBoss Developer Studio 11 will be releasing sometime in the future, and what better way to get started than by learning how to set up all those services that aren’t installed out of the box? Infinispan blog. You can also get this going on OpenShift!

Travels, Videos, and Presentations

 

We’re fast approaching the conference season for the year! JavaOne is happening at the start of October, JAX London the following week, Devoxx Belgium the first part of November, with QCon San Francisco shortly after that. If you’re attending any of those conferences, be sure to look out for Red Hat! Coming up next week, if you’re a developer using or even trying out Drools, jBPM, or Optaplanner, be sure to put September 26th on your calendar. Drools Days in NYC is happening that day. You can also catch the live stream as well. Two days after that in Washington D.C. will be another event. Lastly, a couple of weeks ago Galder was talking about Big Data with Infinispan. You catch the recording over at YouTube in case you missed it.

Welcome everyone, to another edition of JBoss Weekly! We have some great news to share with you all this week. I hope you’ve stayed current with other happenings out in the Java world over the past couple of weeks, including Mark Reinhold’s blog post about moving Java faster. If you missed that, you can read the whole blog post at https://mreinhold.org/blog/forward-faster.

 

 

People Joining the Team

The Hibernate team had two new additions to the team this past week: Arnold Galovics and Jakub Kubrynski! Welcome to team guys!

 

 

Project blogs

Out in the blogosphere, we have two great blog posts about Keycloak and Hawkular. Keycloak in version 3.3.0.CR1 added support for cross-site replication. More information about this feature and an example of how it is used can be found at the Keycloak blog.

The Hawklar blog discussed alerts and OpenTracing earlier this week. It’s a great read and has an example to follow along with as well.

 

A number of blogs about WildFly went out this week. The first talks about FIPS-compliant credential stores within Wildfly. If you’re storing credentials, it’s certainly worth looking into and making sure you’re compliant with FIPS if you need to be. The next three blog posts talk about the WildFly Elytron project, which is the underlying security subsystem in WildFly 11. Farah Juma discusses using EJBs with Elytron in a two part blog series. Both blog posts have information about getting started started and contain code snippets. Continuing with the Elyton theme, Darran Lofthouse explored using Elytron with Undertow standalone for those times you need something really lightweight.

 

A couple of blogs about jBPM and Drools were released over the past week as well. Tihomir discussed the idea of integrating systems with processes. He talks about how processes are usually done in multiple steps and often require multiple systems. jBPM is a wonderful way to integrate these systems and control the whole process. Read Tihomir’s blog for more information. Next up, Mark Proctor ponders the question of whether optimization is Artificial Intelligence (AI) or Operations Research (OR) in his blog post titled Is Optimization AI or OR?For anyone interested in the field of AI, it’s a very good read with some great references to go even deeper.

 

Travels, Videos, and Presentations

Presentations this past week have been a little slow, but we’re gearing up for JavaOne happening in San Francisco at the start of October. Still, Eric Schabell was out at the Red Hat Forum in Finland earlier in the week. Catch up on his talk and see the slides over on his blog.

Claus Ibsen may have already finished his APAC tour last month, but if you missed him, you can at least see his talk from Melbourne over on his blog.

 

Lastly, if you happened to miss week’s DevNation Live this past week, Galder Zamarreño was presenting about Infinispan. Check it out at the DevNation Live page. While you’re there, sign up to be notified of other DevNation Live events!

We’d also like to share an interview done back in April with Eric at Red Hat Summit:

Releases

Lastly, what would a week at Red Hat Middleware be without some releases? We have you covered, don’t you worry! Arquillian released Universe 1.1.13.7 earlier this week. Read more about the release on the Arquillian website. There’s also a new Drone release: 2.4.2! Again, read all about it on the release page.

 

Wildfly Swarm released version 2017.9.4, yep, you read that right. There were some issues with the releases this time around and they had to burn x.9.0-x.9.3. Regardless, it’s a new release and some new changes, bug fixes, and feature requests. Read about it at the release blog.

Thanks, everyone! To all those experiencing natural disasters this week and into the weekend, our thoughts go out to you all. Stay safe!

For those who don't recognise it, the title is a reference to that Nobel Prize winner Bob Dylan and his song, but it really is quite apt at the moment. First let's look at some monumental news which is hopefully not so new now: Java EE is moving to a new home, an as-yet undisclosed open source foundation and to presumably a governance model which puts much more power into the hands of the community! This is pretty significant for the wider enterprise Java community, whether you use a full-blown application server or just some of the components that have been defined over the years within the JCP process; now you will have more ability to help influence the direction of the specifications, code etc. just as you might if you were to participate in any open source project. I'm also hoping that the work we are doing with Eclipse MicroProfile will help influence the next releases of Java EE, or whatever it might be called, since that has always been our intent.

 

OK so on to the next bit of news: www.jboss.org is moving too! Although not quite on the same scale as moving Java EE and not really a move per se, it's important that anyone involved in our upstream communities and products take note because you can really help influence the future of the site. As I mention in my blog on the topic, the changes we have in mind aren't going to happen overnight so there is time to comment or use your clicks to let us know how you use the current site.

 

A few other changes this week include the fact you can now get NoSQL support in jBPM, and as Maciej also describes, through this there's now an option to use ElasticSearch as a data store. Since we're talking about things Maciej has been writing about this week, he's been busy also by writing about how jBPM 7 can be used in cloud environments.

 

Just time for a few more announcements. There's an article on how to use MQTT with Vert.x, WildFly 11 CR1 has been released, and of course there have been a number of other projects doing releases so go check out the blog feed. OK that's it for this week (surely that's enough?!) See you next time.

Interview with Brian Leathem & Leslie Hinson from the PartternFly Project

 

 

In this interview, Jason Porter interviews Brian Leathem & Leslie Hinson from the PaternFly project. PatternFly is a community project that promotes design commonality and improved user experience. Its offerings include open source code, patterns, style guides and an active community that helps support it all. Watch the video to learn more!

 

Other News

 

 

 

New Releases

 

  • Hibernate Search 5.8.0 RC1. This is hoped to be the last release before 5.8.0 becomes final. So this will be the last opportunity for the community to test it and report bugs before the final release.
  • Vert.x 3.5.0.Beta1. This release comes with an implementation of the RxJava2 API, an MQTT client implementation and lots more.

I enjoy reading about and being involved with different organizations that help young men and women get more involved in technology and the sciences.  I like to help with codecamps but a part of my background is around security with Operating Systems and Middleware. Recently I found a US organization, AFA CyberPatriot, that helps youth learn more about finding vulnerabilities and hardening systems through competitions.  Teams compete locally as well as the state level, and then move on to a national competition to compete for the national recognition and scholarship money.  We all get busy in our endeavours, but finding a organization to help our youth, regardless of location in the world, has such an awesome reward.

 

Now on to the happenings in our open source community!

 

The Past couple of Weeks Highlights

 

The Past couple of Weeks Meetups and Conferences

 

The Past couple of Weeks Releases

 

Thanks for being a part of the JBoss Community and stay tuned for the next Weekly Editorial!

 

Kenneth Peeples

Vice President of Engineering,

Enterprise Services Practice, ISC-CG, Federal

kenneth.peeples@isc-cg.com

Open Source Solutions Director, Shadow-Soft, Commercial

kpeeples@shadow-soft.com

Welcome to another edition of the JBoss Weekly Editorial, another trip through the JBoss Communities in search of interesting articles and topics.

 

Red Hat Summit Interview with Geoffrey De Smet

 

 

In this week's developer interview Jason Porter interviews Geoffrey De Smet, a Principal Software Engineer with Red Hat and technical lead of the OptaPlanner constraint satisfaction solver project.

 

Cluster Counters in Infinispan

 

Infinispan 9.1 introduced a new feature enabling support for cluster counters which are distributed amongst all nodes in the cluster.  There are two flavours of cluster, counter, strong counters which provide atomic access during updates and weak counters which supports eventual consistency and faster writes.

 

Improvements to Hawkular Grafana

 

The hawkular team have introduced two significant improvements in their Hawkular Grafana datasource.  The first improvement is the ability to use the Hawkular Metrics' query language instead of simple key/value pairs, supported by a more elaborate query builder within the UI; the second improvement allows queries to run against aggregated sets of metric data, reducing network load and the amount of processing on the client side.

 

JBoss Community Asylum - Episode 45

 

The next episode of the JBoss Community Asylum podcast is now available, hosted by Emmanuel Bernard and Max Andersen.  In this episode Emmanuel and Max interview Hardy Ferentschik and discuss minishift, a project which enables you to setup and run a single node OpenShift cluster within a VM.

 

Why I Started Using Containers

 

The last few years has seen a rise in the popularity of containers within enterprises, allowing applications to be deployed with greater density and flexibility than was previously possible, however many are still considering their adoption and looking for reasons to do so.  If you are still considering the adoption of containers within your enterprise then Ricardo's reflections, after many years of experience using containers, may be of great interest.

 

Optimising IT in Retail Processes

 

In the third installment of his series on "Optimizing IT" Eric Schabell discusses options for how retail processes can be optimised by leveraging existing projects and investments and deploying to a modern container-based cloud platform, showcasing some of these options through the Red Hat Cloud Suite product.

 

Hibernate News

 

The latest version of Hibernate News is out bringing new articles from the Hibernate Community.  Within this edition of the newsletter are articles discussing the differences between persist and merge in relation to JPA transaction boundaries, using Hibernate in Grails, some caveats of using Streams when limiting records fetched by a JDBC ResultSet and many more.

 

JBoss Out and About

 

This October 5th and 6th sees OpenSlava 2017 return to the beautiful city of Bratislava in Slovakia.  Eric Schabell will be giving the opening keynote session on open source, Red Hat and what's interesting in our emerging technologies and will also be submitting proposals for other talks he is hoping to present during the conference.  Registrations for the conference should be opening soon.

 

New Releases

 

 

That's all for this week's edition of the JBoss Weekly Editorial, please join us again next week when we will bring you more updates and content from the JBoss Communities.

Last week have seen quite a lot of releases in the JBoss Community, especially the latest version of Infinispan Infinispan 9.1 "Bastille", but also the publication of several in depth articles, which clearly justifies the large 'tech bytes' section below. Enjoy !

 

Red Hat Summit Interview with Thomas Qvarnstrom on JBoss EAP

 

 

Tech bytes

 

As mentioned above, there was quite a lot of interesting - and technical, content released last week, on the numerous blogs attached to the JBoss Community. The most striking one to me is probably this little tour of Infinispan internal on Infinispan: Conflict Management and Partition Handling, but also I also quite appreciated the webinar on Build distributed microservices using Apache Camel deployed on containers (webinar). The EDI Transformations with Fuse Integration Services (FIS)

tutorial also provided a nice glance into FIS.

 

Last, but not the least, there was a couple of little article on Elytron, including Under The Elytron: Custom Test Credential Store and Darran's WildFly Blog: WildFly Elytron - Principal Transformers, Realm Mappings, and Principal Decoders. Both are certainly worth taking a look at...

 

Evangelist's Corner

 

Eric D. Schabell's How to Optimize Existing IT by Modernizing HR Processes and How to Optimize Existing IT by Modernizing Financial Processes, both released last week, featured interesting thoughts on modernizing corporate processes, along with some nice online demo / example code.

 

Releases, releases, releases...

 

Decaf'


To finish this week entry, here is a couple of links, stepping out of the "Java" world, but certainly worth taking a look at :

 

 

Hopefully, you have found something in this week's editorial to pique your interest and give you something to explore while waiting for next week's installment. Join us here next week for more news from the JBoss Community.

This week we are seeing a lot of activity around WildFly Swarm, in additional to the usual set of releases you have come to expect from the JBoss Community.

Microservices with WildFly Swarm

 

WildFly Swarm allows you to optimise your Java EE application for Microservice deployments, by packaging them with just enough of the server runtime to "java -jar" your application. Watch the interview with project lead, Ken Finnigan, to learn more. Also, you can learn about the latest release here.

 

WildFly Swarm is also Eclipse MicroProfile compliant. Learn here  how the Eclipse MicroProfile initiative is rapidly bringing Microservices support to Java EE, in a fully open way, despite the slowing pace of Java EE specification releases.

 

Elsewhere, Pavol Loffay on the Hawkular team shows us how to rapidly setup a JAX-RS application using Wildfly Swarm’s app generator. He then instruments the application, showing you how to trace the business layer logic and add custom-data to the trace.

 

Releases

 

  • Teiid 9.3.1. The latest bug-fix release of Teiid. The next preview release of 10.0 will be due out in about 2 weeks.
  • Hibernate Validator 6.0.0.CR3. With Bean Validation 2.0.0.CR3 support and several other fixes and improvements.
  • Bean Validation 2.0 CR 3 Specification. Bean Validation 2.0 CR 3 has been released and submitted to the JCP for final approval ballot. Stay tuned to track progress.

This week we've a mixed bunch of entries to highlight. Let's start with a mainstay of this editorial, jBPM and Drools. Edson has been writing about how they and OptaPlanner are switching to agile delivery! Hot on the heels of that Kris gives an overview of the 7.0 release of jBPM! Wow, I remember when we were still at version 3! Maciej has more to say on the topic of jBPM 7 too when he dives into some changes which affect case management.

 

This week we've also seen some prolific activity from the various data teams. For example, William on Distributed Streams in Infinispan, Radim on the new scattered cache implementation, again in Infinispan, and Galder recapping on Reactive Big Data. And speaking of reactive systems we've got a posting for a GSoC student working on Vert.x and OpenAPI! Really good to see student activity in our projects.

 

Of course we've had a number of project releases, including Claus on Camel in Action 2nd Edition, Teiid 10.0.0 Alpha 1, and Keycloak 3.2.0 Final. Check out the buzz for more!

 

That's it for this week! See you next time!!

There are two Manning Early-Access Books (MEAP) that are getting close to full release.   They revolve around the enterprise technologies, Enterprise Integration Patterns (EIP) and Business Process Management (BPM) and written by well known authors in the communities.  Both include associated source code.

 

Camel in Action, Second Edition, is packed full of examples and explanations of concepts with over 900 pages.  It is written by Claus Ibsen and Jonathan Anstey.  I am excited to read through all the sections, but more specifically the out in the wild section that contains:

                • Microservices with Docker and Kubernetes
                • Camel Tooling
                • Camel and IoT
                • Reactive Camel

The description for the book is below and is a great addition to a technical library:

 

Camel in Action, Second Edition is the most complete Camel book on the market. This updated tutorial is full of small examples showing how to work with the integration patterns. It starts with core concepts like sending, receiving, routing, and transforming data. It then shows you the entire lifecycle and goes in depth on how to test, deal with errors, scale, deploy, and monitor your app and even how to build custom tooling - details you can find only in the Camel code itself. Written by core developers of Camel and the authors of the first edition, this book distills their experience and practical insights so that you can tackle integration tasks like a pro.

 

Effective Business Process Management with JBoss BPM, provides shortened working examples and is written by Eric Schabell.  I look forward to reading through the complex business rules section, in addition to the rest, and trying the examples.  The description for the book below and would another great addition to a technical library:

 

Effective Business Process Management with JBoss BPM is an understandable and easy-to-follow guide to mastering JBoss BPM. You'll begin with an introduction to BPM concepts and a walk through of the JBoss BPM Suite, followed by hands-on steps for setting up JBoss BPM tools to get started on your first project. You'll move on to practical and important topics like data modeling,  business rules and processes, form design, and testing. After you've mastered the nuts and bolts, you'll learn advanced topics like business activity modeling, Rest API, demo collection, and expert tips and tricks. After reading this book, you'll know how to leverage JBoss BPM to tackle your organization's challenges with process solutions that keep your business agile and able to execute on the goals that matter to you most.

 

Now on to the happenings in our open source community!

 

The Past couple of Weeks Highlights

 

The Past couple of Weeks Meetups and Conferences

 

The Past couple of Weeks Releases

 

Thanks for being a part of the JBoss Community and stay tuned for the next Weekly Editorial!

 

Kenneth Peeples

Vice President of Engineering,

Enterprise Services Practice, ISC-CG, Federal

kenneth.peeples@isc-cg.com

Open Source Solutions Director, Shadow-Soft, Commercial

kpeeples@shadow-soft.com

Welcome to this week's edition of the JBoss Weekly Editorial, our regular spin through the JBoss Communities in search of interesting articles and developments

 

Red Hat Summit Interview with Clement Escoffier

 

 

In this week's developer interview Jason Porter interviews Clement Escoffier, a Principal Software Engineer with Red Hat who works as a core developer on the Vert.x project.

 

Introducing Asynchronous Programming with Eclipse Vert.x

 

If you have an interest in asynchronous programming using Vert.x then you may be interested in a new guide developed by the Vert.x community.  The guide is called “A gentle guide to asynchronous programming with Eclipse Vert.x for enterprise application developers” and demonstrates how to take an application from a "quick and dirty" implementation through to a refactored Vert.x solution and finally to a reactive solution using the RxJava library.  Don't forget to leave feedback or submit PRs for updates you would like to see.

 

Mobile Application Development

 

This week sees a number of articles describing various aspects of mobile application development using Red Hat Mobile Application Platform.  In the first article Evan describes how docker can be used to simplify the deployment of MongoDB and Redis, two of the platform dependencies, to support the setup of a local development environment.  In the next article David Martin demonstrates how to use peer, scoped and private npm dependencies using the Dynofarm mobile backend while in the final article David French demonstrates how to debug mobile applications with Visual Studio Code.

 

Transactional Sagas

 

With the continuing importance of long running transactions, especially within the context of distributed applications such as those following the microservices paradigm, it is important for application developers to understand how these transactions are implemented and what changes will be necessary for applications to successfully support this behaviour.  If this is something you are considering then the Narayana team have written a post describing how Sagas differ from the traditional two-phase commit protocol, which transactional property is relaxed and the ways in which transactional failures can be handled.

 

Instrumenting Java Frameworks using OpenTracing

 

In the first article of a series looking at instrumenting various Java Framework, Pavol demonstrates how easy it is to instrument a simple Sprint Boot application using OpenTracing with minimal changes to the application code.

 

Developing your First Business Rules Application on OpenShift

 

In previous articles Duncan has demonstrated how to deploy an existing Business Rules application into the OpenShift environment but he has not yet shown how these application are developed, until now that is.  Using a simple application Duncan takes us through the process of building a rules project, creating the associated data model, developing the rules and finally enabling the project for building using the OpenShift S2I process.

 

EJB Clients for EAP 7.1

 

The EAP 7.1 release will introduce some new features available to applications making use of remote EJB communication including a simpler method for discovering remote EJBs and new annotations for controlling transaction propagation and enabling client side interceptors.

 

Installing OpenShift Container Platform in Minutes

 

Yes you read that correctly, it is possible to deploy OpenShift Container Platform in minutes!  Eric has given numerous presentations on this topic to various groups and conferences and has now made a video available so everyone can learn just how this can be achieved.

 

JBoss Out and About

 

This week saw Galder attend Berlin Buzzwords 2017 where he gave a presentation entitled Big Data in Action with Infinispan.

 

New Releases

 

 

That's all for this week, I hope you have managed to find something of interest in these articles and I invite you to return next week when we will bring more news and interviews from those working within the JBoss Communities.

Welcome to this week's editorial! As always, you'll find the JBoss community has been quite active in the last days and produced many releases and interesting content for you. But especially, I would like to point out the latest release of Teiid (9.3), which brings many bug fixes and features enhancements but more importantly come with a small announcement regarding the future of Teiid, and the upcoming changes. While the developers have obviously plans for the future of the project, they are also welcoming request and suggestions - so if you ever wanted to see Teiid evolve in a certain way, it's time to speak up!

 

Tech bytes

 

Christina Lin's post, last week, on The rise of Agile Integration - Integration is not DEAD nor LAME! really caught my eye. She makes, of course, a lot of sense, and I found this entry to be a refreshing read - amidst the current flow of "microservices this" and "microservices that", that often forget that microservices, like Docker, will not "fix everything". Still on the topic of microservice, the third of Microservices Patterns With Envoy Proxy, Part III: Distributed Tracing was just released and is again an excellent read.

 

If you microservice is not your cup of your tea or just if you are interested in security, the following article will be also a nice read: Under The Elytron: Update of Credential Store alias operations.

 

On the shelf

 

In this digital age, people, especially working in our industry, can be surprised that books are still published. Even more especially on technological topics, as the matter at hand tends to evolve very quickly. I'm not one of those people. I personally think that book are still the best tool to understand, deeply and with a complete overview, a topic or a technology. The internet brings thousands of blogs, that are priceless when it comes to finding tidbits or getting how to, but rare are the information or documentation online, complete enough (or well designed enough) to allow one to really understands a complex topic.

 

All of that to introduce this New Book – Understanding Message Brokers from Jakub Korab. If you are an ActiveMQ user, or just interested in the topic of messaging, I can but only recommend you check out the book!

 

Evangelist's Corner

 

The numerous evangelists around the JBoss community are always on the job, but none is as productive as Eric D. Schabell who released, in the last days AppDev in the Cloud self-paced, free, online workshop, along with a sum up of an Evening of AppDev in the Cloud Workshop.

 

Releases, releases, releases...

 

Only three releases in the last week, but at least two major ones! First, Teiid 9.3 Final was released as mentioned above, but also WildFly Swarm 2017.6.0 - and both releases are an excellent opportunity to try out those two products if you never have. Last but not least, Arquillian Spacelift 1.0.2 was also released.

 

Decaf'

As always, here some interesting news, coming for outside the Java community but still very relevant to us: Red Hat and Apache OpenWhisk. Also, if you have interest, like me, in Ansible, you might want to share this article on a New level of automation with Ansible around you, as it is a nice introduction to the topic.

 

Hopefully, you have found something in this week's editorial to pique your interest and give you something to explore while waiting for next week's installment. Join us here next week for more news from the JBoss Community.