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Weekly Editorial

297 posts

Yet again an other week has passed in the JBoss Community, and as always, a lot content was released that will most likely interest you. Especially this week a lot of JBoss/Java related content were published on the Red Hat Developers Blog, so if you don't check this blog, you will be happy to see them mentioned here below...

 

Higher Level Point of View

While we love our gritty, low-level, technical tidbits (and we have a techbytes section for that below), it is always nice to take a step back, and look at the big picture, now and then. In this context, I think you will find the article on Hexagonal Architecture as a Natural fit for Apache Camel, quite interesting. I also like the The State of Microservices Survey 2017 that was released last week too.

 

Evangelist's Corner

 

As always, JBoss's evangelist are keeping our community update, releasing, every week, a lot of passionating content. Last week, Eric D.Schabell has thus provided us a nice How to install new OpenShift Container Platform 3.7 in minutes , along with an article on Zero to Cloud Ops on Container Development Kit (CDK) in Minutes. So, if you literally have only 5 minutes this week, those are articles are for you

 

Techbytes

So after high level considerations and some tutorial, let's go deep into technical details with this short but pretty neat article on Calling JDK Tools Programmatically on Java 9. Then, if you want more, let's take a look at Securing AMQ7 Routers with SSL. That should do it, don't it ? No ? Want more ?

 

No problem, let's look at Keycloak Identity Brokering with OpenShift ! And, by the way, if you like OpenShift, you should be very interested by last announcement about Red Hat OpenShift Application Runtimes (RHOAR)!

 

Events and community

If you want a good excuse to good to Paris (or France), you will be happy to hear that Devoxx France 2018 just open its Call for Paper! So please, go submit your talks proposal before mid January!

 

If you are doing anything with Hibernate related project, also don't forget to check their Hibernate Community Newsletter 23/2017 that was just released.

Releases, releases, releases...

 

... and as always, our thriving community has seen its fair share of software releases in the last week - including maintenance release of two very important project (Teiid and Keycloak):

 

Hopefully, you have found something in this week's editorial to pique your interest and give you something to explore while waiting for next week's installment. Join us here next week for more news from the JBoss Community.

As many are coming back to work after the Thanksgiving holiday, we are seeing a flurry of bog posts and a significant number of Arquillian releases. Read on to find out more...

 

Back from Madrid JUG and Codemotion Madrid!!

Galder Zamarreño & Thomas Segismont attended the Codemotion Madrid conference. In this post Galder talks about the conference and in particular their talks. These talks covered data analytics using Infinispan-based data grids and streaming data with Infinispan, Vert.x and OpenShift.

 

AppDev in the Cloud with Financial Customer Evaluation Solution

In this post Eric Schabell shows us how to get started with the Customer Evaluation Demo using the JBoss BPM Suite on OpenShift Container Platform.

 

Introducing the Hibernate Search JSR 352 mass indexing job

Originally started as a Google Summer of Code project by Mincong Huang, Hibernate Search 5.9 will feature integration with JSR 352, "Batch Applications for the Java Platform". This integration provides a new implementation of mass indexing (indexing a high volume of entities) as a JSR 352 job. Read this post to learn more.

 

Releases

It's been a rather quiet week, probably due to a lot of our team getting ready for US Thanksgiving. But there has been some activity and in the spirit of getting something out (release early, release often) ...

 

The Infinispan and Vert.x teams are in Madrid this week for Codemotion (I hope they're getting better weather than some of us!) If you are in the area then this is a great opportunity to go and see a couple of our teams and give them feedback, learn the roadmaps etc. And even though some of the team are in Spain, they managed to put out an update to the Infinispan/Spark connector, which Gustavo discusses. Plus an update to the C++ and C# Hotrod clients!

 

As usual, there's the Hibernate Community Newsletter to browse while you're working or digesting turkey! And we've even had a Teiid release, version 9.3.5 this time. Congratulations to the team!!

 

While I've got your attention I'll take the opportunity to remind you all about EE4J. I've spoken about this before on my blog, but there's been a lot of activity in the last few days as we've started to ask for input on the new Java EE brand name (EE4J is the project, not the brand), as well as moving some specifications and reference implementations across to the project, as you can see from the twitter feed:

 

Screen Shot 2017-11-23 at 09.28.52.png

Please take a look and get involved.

 

OK that's it for this week!

Welcome back to another edition of JBoss Weekly! We’re excited to bring to you news from across the net relating to JBoss Middleware. Those of you who attended Devoxx Belgium, we hope you had the opportunity to speak with our engineers there!

Releases

 

We’ll kick off the editorial with the releases made in Middleware this past week:

As you can see, the Arquillian team has been on a roll this past week! Congratulations to the team and all those who helped to make it happen.

Releases aplenty this past week! A job well done to all our engineers and community contributors, thanks for all the help!

Blog Highlights

 

Those of you getting started with Docker and Java, you’ll want to check out Amit Nijhawan’s post about how to deploy Java applications with Docker. It’s a great primer.

React is a great thing, and becoming very popular. Samuel Mendenhall shares a plenitude of advice from rebuilding an Angular app to a React app. It’s a longer post, but if you’re getting started with React, or experiencing some difficulties you’ll want to read it.

If you’re at the point of embracing Java 9 and the new modules system, you’ll be thrilled to know that starting with Red Hat JBoss Developer Studio 11.1 supports Java 9! Eclipse doesn’t have to be running on Java 9, but a Java 9 JDK must be on the build path for the project. JBDS 11.1 offers help to convert to Java modules as well. Read Jeff Maury’s post about the Java 9 support for full details.Lastly, the Red Hat Developer Program has rolled out a new topic about secure programming. We all know security isn’t something to be taken lightly, however, it isn’t always the easiest of things to understand and get right. Lucy Kerner details the current tools on the website. Be sure to read both and get a good idea of what’s being offered and how it can help!

Thanks everyone for another amazing week! We hope you’re prepared for the year-end holidays and hope you have a fantastic week.

Modern Transaction Programming Techniques

This week Tom Jenkinson blogged about recent standardisation effort in the Microservices arena. This standard allows highly concurrent environments to gain many of the benefits of a traditional transaction, with a reduced impact on throughput.

In addition, Michael Musgrove blogged about Narayana's Software Transactional Memory (STM) implementation. In particular he showed how it can be used with the actor model features of Vert.x and the scaling features of OpenShift.

 

5 Pillars of a Successful Java Web Application

In this series of posts Eder Ignatowicz describes the 5 pillars that have allowed his team to successfully keep a 7+ year-old Java application up-to-date, whilst combining modern techniques with a legacy codebase of more than 1 million LOC, using an agile, sustainable, and evolutionary web approach. Read the series here: part 1, part 2, part 3.

 

Other News

Releases

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As always, last week have seen its fair share of action in the JBoss Community, with multiples releases and many interesting (and technical) content being released, but especially the Debezium project has been going the extra mile to allow to discover their product, crafting a nice tutorial and even providing OpenShift and Docker files to help play with it... So go check it out !

 

Change data capture with Debezium (and even on OpenShift!)

 

The Debezium team just released version 0.6.1 of their change data capturing (CDC) tool for MySQL, Postgres and MongoDB (support for further databases is coming soon).  For those eager to try out CDC themselves, there's a tutorial running you through the set-up of Debezium and its required services like Apache Kafka. There are now Docker Compose files for all the supported databases, which make it a breeze to start the infrastructure used in the tutorial and see Debezium in action.

 

You would like to set up Debezium on OpenShift? Then we got good news for you, too; There are detailed instructions on how to do that available on the Debezium website now. And using Minishift, you can easily try this out on an OpenShift cluster running on your local machine. Development of Debezium is in full swing, enabling many use cases such as data replication, data synchronization between different microservices or updating full-text search indexes. If you got any input or questions on Debezium, the development team is looking forward to hearing from you in the Debezium discussion group.

 

Building and consuming Virtual Microdatabase

 

Teiid - on which the Red Hat product JBoss Data Virtualization is based on, is rather powerful and interesting tool, that is (to my experience) yet to be well spread and understand. So I'm very happy about this new walk through released last week, presenting, in detail, how one set up and consume, in just a few click, a virtual database.

 

On top of this tutorial, a rather intriguing article on Low-risk Monolith to Microservice Evolution has been released last week, and will certainly allow to go even deeper and farther with Teiid.

 

Fun with SSL (and Kafka)

 

In the last few years, with security becoming more and more of concerns (as it should!), setting up Java solution to directly use SSL have been  an increasing practise (oppose to the days when this was delegated to the load-balancer in front of them). In this context, it is nice to have a tutorial, such as this one released last week on Kafka with OpenSSL. But it is even more appreciable to have also an article on how to test SSL set up (and how): SSL Testing Tool. So no more excuse to run insecure services !

 

Techbytes

 

If your technical thirst for technical exploration or learning is still not quenched by all of those articles, there still a couple more thing you can explore. First, if you are hookup on Drools and the related jBPM ecosystem, you checkout the Improved KIE Server documentation along with this article on Sub cases for case instance and ... process instance (jBPM). And maybe simply explore the Bean Validation benchmark revisited ?

 

Evangelist's Corner

 

Eric D. Schabell's 10 Steps to Cloud Happiness series is still ongoing and last week saw the release of Step 5 - Real Process Improvement - certainly a teasing title, isn't it ! Go check it out ! (or catch up on the series by starting with Step 1 - Get a Cloud.

 

Also, if you are happen to be an Infinispan fan (or just interested by it), see if you can join the upcoming event featuring talks about it: Infinispan coming to Duchess France and Devoxx Belgium !

 

Releases, releases, releases...

 

 

Decaf'

 

Enough of Java coding, GC and other JVM madness ? TIme for a break ? Have something else for a little while ? Well let's see what happened last week on the non-Java universe...

 

If you want learn about infrastructure, especially all the complexity (and power) of a provisioning a environement on a large scale, I can but only recommend this two part article :

 

 

More anecdotal, but definitely noteworthy is Jim Whitehurst (Red Hat CEO) interview on ... Slashdot !

 

Hopefully, you have found something in this week's editorial to pique your interest and give you something to explore while waiting for next week's installment. Join us here next week for more news from the JBoss Community.

The big news this week is...

 

wildflycarousel_11_blackbkg.png

WildFly 11 Final was released this week. As you would expect for a major WildFly release, it comes with many significant improvements. Including:

 

  • Elytron - New Security Infrastructure. The biggest change in WildFly 11 is unification on a new common security framework across the full application server.
  • Simplified EJB / Naming Proxies. JNDI and EJB invocation have both been simplified and enhanced in WildFly 11.
  • Request oriented EJB/JNDI over HTTP.
  • WildFly OpenSSL & HTTP/2. WildFly 11 now provides a JSSE provider that can offload TLS handling from the JVM’s internal implementation to an OpenSSL library on your system, typically improving TLS performance.
  • New Load-Balancer Configs. In order to simplify the setup of WildFly as an HTTP load-balancer, there is an additional standalone-load-balancer.xml configuration in the distribution, which is an instance slimmed to just running the load balancing services.
  • Graceful Shutdown/Startup Improvements. Distributed transactions are now handled by the graceful shutdown mechanism.
  • Web Console Improvements. A number of Web Console improvements are included in WildFly 11, including the ability to see recent configuration changes, to manage active JMS transactions, manage active batch jobs, manage Undertow filters, and test data-sources during creation.
  • Management and Configuration Improvements. WildFly 11 now supports remote managed exploded deployments, which allows remote management clients the ability to update content within the deployment, such as html and jsp files without requiring a full redeployment.

 

Read more here.

 

Microservices & Microprofile

 

It's been a busy week for Microservices content. Christian Posta continues his series on Low-risk Monolith to Microservice Evolution, which looks to be a great writeup for those planning a migration to a Microservices architecture. Ken Finnigan provides a step-by-step guide to setting up data streaming with WildFly Swarm and Apache Kafka. Cesar Saavedra continues his guide on setting up a MicroProfile-based microservice on OpenShift Container Platform. Finally, Heiko Rupp explains how to monitor an Eclipse MicroProfile 1.2 server with Prometheus.

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Other News

Releases

Welcome to another edition of the JBoss Weekly Editorial, our regular visit to the JBoss Communities in search of all that is new and interesting

 

Monitoring Microservices

 

The Eclipse MicroProfile 1.2 release introduces a number of aspects which enable monitoring of microservices, two of which are health checks and metrics.  These features are simple to enable within a microservice written to the specification, more details on how this can be achieved can be found in Heiko's article on the subject.

 

Integrating a MicroService with JBoss Data Grid

 

In the third part of his tutorial series covering the development of a microservice running on OpenShift Cesar describes how to deploy and configure an instance of JBoss Data Grid before covering the necessary changes to invoke the service from his existing microservice.

 

Evolving a Monolithic Application into Microservices

 

Having set the context in the first article of his series describing how to transition a monolithic application over to a microservices architecture Christian shows how to decompose his example monolothic application into individual services while retaining the same functionality.

 

WildFly and Elytron

 

Jan Kalina has written two articles discussing aspects of the new Elytron security subsystem being introduced in the upcoming WildFly 11 release.  In his first article Jan shows how we can configure the Elytron subsystem to secure the server side portion of an SSL exchange and in his second article he shows how we can extend the configuration to enforce verification of the client certificates.

 

OpenID Connect Identity Brokering using Red Hat Single Sign-On

 

Red Hat Single Sign-On (RH-SSO) supports identity federation based on a number of specifications including OpenID Connect, if you are interested in this capability then take a look at Tom's tutorial where he explains the concepts behind identity federation and shows how this can be enabled through RH-SSO.

 

10 Steps to Cloud Happiness

 

In the next article of his Cloud Happiness series, Eric Schabell introduces us to his third step towards happiness and shows how we can enhance our existing cloud and include a unified management and operations environment through the installation of Red Hat CloudForms.

 

Container Images for OpenShift

 

At this year's EMEA Red Hat Tech Exchange 2017 Frédéric Giloux gave a presentation discussing good practices for creating images running within OpenShift, in the last two sections covering his session Frédéric discusses how to make your images easier to consume and the aspects of cloud ready applications and their consequences for container image design.

 

Installing Red Hat Mobile on OpenShift

 

If you are interested in trying out the Red Hat Mobile Application Platform (RHMAP) then Brian's article will be of interest to you.  Starting from scratch Brian will take you through all the steps necessary to deploy a demonstration environment on an AWS OpenShift environment, leaving you with a sandboxed environment to explore the platform.

 

Infinispan Cache Store Batch Operations

 

Infinispan 9.1.x introduces the ability to batch write and delete operations on a cache store, significantly improving the performance of write-behind cache stores.  There are some minor configuration changes associated with this new feature along with two additional methods you should implement on your cache store.

 

Data Authorisation in Case Management

 

In his next article discussing jBPM's Case Management feature Maciej Swiderski covers some recent additions adding support for case file authorisation, case comment authorisation, closing cases with comments and indexing case file items for searching.

 

Meeting Rafael Ponte

 

In the next article of his community interview series Vlad introduces us to Rafael Ponte, a software developer, conference speaker, blogger and member of the Hibernate community who is passionate about Java Persistence.

 

JBoss: Developer's Guide

 

Elvadas has recently had his book entitled "JBoss: Developer's Guide" published by Packt.  The book introduces you to the JBoss ecosystem through hands-on coding and lab exercises based on real-life business examples and currently has a 40% discount on the eBook if you use the discount code is JBDG40 before October 31, 2017.

 

JBoss Out and About

 

The Vert.x team have busy over the last month with Julien giving a presentation at the JUG Summer Camp in La Rochelle, France entitled "Eclipse Vert.x for DJ fun and for profit!" and Thomas giving a presentation at JavaOne 2017 entitled "Unleash Your Talents: Server-Side Kotlin for Mobile Developers".

 

Galder from the Infinispan team recently gave a presentation at Basel One 2017 entitled "Streaming Data Analysis with Kubernetes".

 

New Releases

 

 

That's all for this week's JBoss Weekly Editorial, please join us again next week when we will take another spin through the Jboss Communities in search of interesting articles.

Running software in the clouds have been an essential topic of our industry for almost a decade now. While it used to be reserved to the cutting-edge, experimental and adventurous projects, it has been, in the last years, adopted largely by the industry. In this context, it is quite exciting to see all the news of last weeks surrounding the topic within the JBoss Community...

clouds

10 Steps to Cloud Happiness

 

If you have lived under a rock for the past decade, you may have no idea about cloud infrastructure - or maybe you never ended up using one. This editorial focuses a lot on cloud, so maybe you can take a look, at first, at the 10 steps tutorial started by Eric D.Schabell last week ?

 

 

Best way into the Clouds - OpenShift

Well, this might only be my opinion - so feel free to disagree - but I do think OpenShift is one of the best ways to get into a cloud infrastructure. And there was quite a lot of nifty informations about it released last week. First of all this pretty interesting article on JBoss A-MQ on OpenShift Cheat Sheet, will certainly help you manage your favorite MoM on a OpenShift container.

To go further down the road, you may even want to explore how to properly maintain your own images in OpenShift, than this first installment of a series of articles on Container Images for OpenShift (Part 1: Objectives) will certainly reveals itself to be an excellent starting point.

 

Last, but certainly not the least, an announcement from Red Hat and Alibaba, just yesterday, shows how much traction Cloud is having in our industry : Red Hat and Alibaba Cloud Join Forces to Bring Increased Flexibility with Open Source.

Eclipse - Java Tooling for the Sky

 

As much as cloud infrastructure is bringing easiness of deployment and scalable performance to your (Java) application, one still needs to write and design a resilient and robust application, not to mention the increasing need for the app to be as secure as possible against the many hacking threats out there.

Fortunately, the Eclipse project keeps enhancing the IDE, enabling us, developers, to write better apps. If you doubt, just take an eye at this article on Java code coverage in Eclipse! I'm pretty sure you never thought of using code coverage this way.... It is also nice to see the integration of Fuse technologies within Eclipse is making progress as shown by the following article: Fuse development environment with Development Suite installer.

If you are excited by the new evolution or the future of the IDE, you should definitely join other members of the JBoss community, along with some Red Hat Developers at EclipseCon Europe on the 24th and 25th of October in Ludwigsburg, near Stuttgart, in Germany.

 

Hibernation season has started

 

Despite the actual meaning of its name, the Hibernate community has also been very active and keeping up with what is happening within the projects. It would require a separate article to cover it all! Fortunately, last week saw the release of the Hibernate Community Newsletter 19/2017 , so you just this need to check this out to get updated, and to make your user experience even smoother, the Hibernate websites get a facelift!

 

Techbytes

 

Of course, not everything things is about cloud. As always, the JBoss community having been working on numerous projects and keep offering improvements of all sort to their users. For instance, Apache Camel fans will be very happy to read (more) about Apache Camel route coverage tooling on the way. Or maybe you would like to learn how to set up Hawkular Alerts in ManageIQ? Or rather how to Run an Embedded WildFly Host Controller in the CLI?

 

See, plenty of advanced materials there, but maybe you crave learning new things, rather than delve into complex topics. So, what about Getting started with workbench and KIE server on 7.3 (and onwards)?

 

Also, any Java developer will be interested in knowing what is coming with the JDK 9 release, so let's take a look at this Overview of the New JDK 9 Release.

 

Hopefully, you have found something in this week's editorial to pique your interest and give you something to explore while waiting for next week's installment. Join us here next week for more news from the JBoss Community.

Welcome back to another weekly editorial! Those of you catching up from JavaOne, we hope you found time to visit the booth and try out OpenShift.io! There are a number of posts to cover this week, so, let’s get started.

Releases

 

We’ll start out with releases this time. There’s only three of them this week, but that doesn’t mean we’ve slacked off.

Announcements

 

By far the biggest announcement in the Java EE space happened earlier in the week with the announcement of EE4J! Our very own Mark Little blogged about it. If this is the first you’re seeing of it, be sure to read Mark’s blog and check out the charter. Everyone is welcome to participate. Please sign up for the mailing list and help us all move Enterprise Java forward!

If you’re running on RHEL, you may be excited for the next couple of blogs from Mike Guerette. Earlier in the week, Red Hat announced the availability of Red Hat Developer Toolset 7.0 Beta. This beta brings updates to GCC (7.2) and adds Clang/LLVM 4.0.1, Go 1.8.3, and Rust 1.2.0 to the list of supported compilers! In addition to those, Mike also announced Red Hat Software Collections 3.0 Beta which includes other updates and also new additions.

Blog Highlights

 

To round out the week, there are a number of blog posts we’d like to highlight.

Wildfly

Wildfly 11 will bring with it a number of changes. Among those changes is integration with Apache ActiveMQ Artemis. Be sure to read the blog for changes and new features available. There’s also support for OpenSSL. The post details setup, security realms, and Elytron all with OpenSSL support! Lastly, Wildfly 11 improves the existing referential integrity found in Wildfly 10.

Spring Boot on Kubernetes

Kamesh Sampath has done a series of posts over on the Red Hat Developer blog detailing configuring Spring Boot on Kubernetes. The introduction of the series covers the initial idea of using Kubernetes for configuration of a Spring Boot application. Part I covers using ConfigMaps for configuration. Part II details the use of Secrets for sensitive information. These are great alternatives to the Spring Config server.

OpenSlava

Lastly, Eric Schabell was at OpenSlava this past week. All of his talks and slides are available on his blog and SlideShare!

 

Thank you, everyone! We hope you’ve had a great week!

With the release of the new Start Trek TV series, I hope the reader will pardon me for this (not so) inspired title... Nevertheless, JavaOne is coming up and the JBoss Community is getting ready for it !!!

 

JavaOne

As you are certainly aware, JavaOne is coming up soon and, of course, many member of the JBoss community are participating to the event. Namely, this week, some of them start announcing their presence, like Narayana team at JavaOne or Clément Escoffier teaser for his presentation on The Reactive Landscape.

 

Pimp your JBoss Developer Studio - and then explore BPM & Rules !

Last week, Eric D. Schabell took the time to make a coupl of blog entries regarding the JBoss Developer Studio (an Eclipse based IDE). Especially he focused on how to set up tooling for some important project of the community within the IDE:

 

Once you have those tool properly installed, you will be all set to follow the 4 hours presentation, from last week, on Processes, Rules and Events: Watch Drools, jBPM and Optaplanner Day LIVE (Sept 26)  !


Expanding your Horizon

 

An Open Source community as thriving as the one of JBoss produces a lot of software, tool, and products to learn and try out. And when I mean a lot, I mean, like, a LOT.  It may be difficult to explore, follow and learn all of them, and this is why, I'm happy to see that many things happened last week to help one exactly do that.

 

So, first, and this is a great news, the Camel in Action 2nd edition goes into production phase ! The announcement also includes some preview on the book content, so go check it out. Then comes Hibernate, that has become its own community of project within JBoss. Which makes it obviously a bit challenging to follow. Thankfully,  last week was released the Hibernate Community Newsletter 18/2017  which will caught you up on anything you may have missed !

 

Of course, there is almost no better way to learn than to be teached by the greatest. Especially when the greatest happens to be also an excellent teacher like Bela Ban. Indeed, Bela has announced a new series of JGroups workshops in Rome and Berlin in November. Having personally attended

his workshop a couple of times, I can but only strongly recommend it. You will learn everything you ever wanted to know about JGroups - and more !

 

Techbytes

 

After all this learning, and the all the upcoming exciting content coming up with JavaOne, you may want to scratch a (technical) hitch and play with some new tech. No worries, an Eclipse Vert.x Gradle Plugin tutorial might be just the fix you need. If not, take a look at how to Add Kerberos Authentication To Existing Web Application.

 

Releases, releases, releases...

 

 

Decaf'

 

Enough is enough ! You don't want to fire Eclipse, neither to debug some Java program, you need something else for a change ? You might be just in luck, because last week was released a very nice article on Ansible - A handy tool for people that might not need it. And being a big fan of Ansible, I can but only advise one to go read it...

 

Hopefully, you have found something in this week's editorial to pique your interest and give you something to explore while waiting for next week's installment. Join us here next week for more news from the JBoss Community.

Happy Java 9 day! Hope everyone is enjoying a new version of Java and getting used to Jigsaw. Sorry, we missed last week, but we’ll get you all caught up here. Again, our hearts go out to those affected by the natural disasters of the past couple of weeks. We hope you and your loved ones are all safe.

 

Project blogs

 

A number of blogs went out over the past two weeks. Let’s start off by connecting Hawkular services over SSL at the Hawkular blog. We all know microservices are the rage right now. Are you considering breaking up your monolith application into microservices? Christian Posta offers his low-risk migration ideas in a multi-part blog post. JBoss Developer Studio 11 will be releasing sometime in the future, and what better way to get started than by learning how to set up all those services that aren’t installed out of the box? Infinispan blog. You can also get this going on OpenShift!

Travels, Videos, and Presentations

 

We’re fast approaching the conference season for the year! JavaOne is happening at the start of October, JAX London the following week, Devoxx Belgium the first part of November, with QCon San Francisco shortly after that. If you’re attending any of those conferences, be sure to look out for Red Hat! Coming up next week, if you’re a developer using or even trying out Drools, jBPM, or Optaplanner, be sure to put September 26th on your calendar. Drools Days in NYC is happening that day. You can also catch the live stream as well. Two days after that in Washington D.C. will be another event. Lastly, a couple of weeks ago Galder was talking about Big Data with Infinispan. You catch the recording over at YouTube in case you missed it.

Welcome everyone, to another edition of JBoss Weekly! We have some great news to share with you all this week. I hope you’ve stayed current with other happenings out in the Java world over the past couple of weeks, including Mark Reinhold’s blog post about moving Java faster. If you missed that, you can read the whole blog post at https://mreinhold.org/blog/forward-faster.

 

 

People Joining the Team

The Hibernate team had two new additions to the team this past week: Arnold Galovics and Jakub Kubrynski! Welcome to team guys!

 

 

Project blogs

Out in the blogosphere, we have two great blog posts about Keycloak and Hawkular. Keycloak in version 3.3.0.CR1 added support for cross-site replication. More information about this feature and an example of how it is used can be found at the Keycloak blog.

The Hawklar blog discussed alerts and OpenTracing earlier this week. It’s a great read and has an example to follow along with as well.

 

A number of blogs about WildFly went out this week. The first talks about FIPS-compliant credential stores within Wildfly. If you’re storing credentials, it’s certainly worth looking into and making sure you’re compliant with FIPS if you need to be. The next three blog posts talk about the WildFly Elytron project, which is the underlying security subsystem in WildFly 11. Farah Juma discusses using EJBs with Elytron in a two part blog series. Both blog posts have information about getting started started and contain code snippets. Continuing with the Elyton theme, Darran Lofthouse explored using Elytron with Undertow standalone for those times you need something really lightweight.

 

A couple of blogs about jBPM and Drools were released over the past week as well. Tihomir discussed the idea of integrating systems with processes. He talks about how processes are usually done in multiple steps and often require multiple systems. jBPM is a wonderful way to integrate these systems and control the whole process. Read Tihomir’s blog for more information. Next up, Mark Proctor ponders the question of whether optimization is Artificial Intelligence (AI) or Operations Research (OR) in his blog post titled Is Optimization AI or OR?For anyone interested in the field of AI, it’s a very good read with some great references to go even deeper.

 

Travels, Videos, and Presentations

Presentations this past week have been a little slow, but we’re gearing up for JavaOne happening in San Francisco at the start of October. Still, Eric Schabell was out at the Red Hat Forum in Finland earlier in the week. Catch up on his talk and see the slides over on his blog.

Claus Ibsen may have already finished his APAC tour last month, but if you missed him, you can at least see his talk from Melbourne over on his blog.

 

Lastly, if you happened to miss week’s DevNation Live this past week, Galder Zamarreño was presenting about Infinispan. Check it out at the DevNation Live page. While you’re there, sign up to be notified of other DevNation Live events!

We’d also like to share an interview done back in April with Eric at Red Hat Summit:

Releases

Lastly, what would a week at Red Hat Middleware be without some releases? We have you covered, don’t you worry! Arquillian released Universe 1.1.13.7 earlier this week. Read more about the release on the Arquillian website. There’s also a new Drone release: 2.4.2! Again, read all about it on the release page.

 

Wildfly Swarm released version 2017.9.4, yep, you read that right. There were some issues with the releases this time around and they had to burn x.9.0-x.9.3. Regardless, it’s a new release and some new changes, bug fixes, and feature requests. Read about it at the release blog.

Thanks, everyone! To all those experiencing natural disasters this week and into the weekend, our thoughts go out to you all. Stay safe!

For those who don't recognise it, the title is a reference to that Nobel Prize winner Bob Dylan and his song, but it really is quite apt at the moment. First let's look at some monumental news which is hopefully not so new now: Java EE is moving to a new home, an as-yet undisclosed open source foundation and to presumably a governance model which puts much more power into the hands of the community! This is pretty significant for the wider enterprise Java community, whether you use a full-blown application server or just some of the components that have been defined over the years within the JCP process; now you will have more ability to help influence the direction of the specifications, code etc. just as you might if you were to participate in any open source project. I'm also hoping that the work we are doing with Eclipse MicroProfile will help influence the next releases of Java EE, or whatever it might be called, since that has always been our intent.

 

OK so on to the next bit of news: www.jboss.org is moving too! Although not quite on the same scale as moving Java EE and not really a move per se, it's important that anyone involved in our upstream communities and products take note because you can really help influence the future of the site. As I mention in my blog on the topic, the changes we have in mind aren't going to happen overnight so there is time to comment or use your clicks to let us know how you use the current site.

 

A few other changes this week include the fact you can now get NoSQL support in jBPM, and as Maciej also describes, through this there's now an option to use ElasticSearch as a data store. Since we're talking about things Maciej has been writing about this week, he's been busy also by writing about how jBPM 7 can be used in cloud environments.

 

Just time for a few more announcements. There's an article on how to use MQTT with Vert.x, WildFly 11 CR1 has been released, and of course there have been a number of other projects doing releases so go check out the blog feed. OK that's it for this week (surely that's enough?!) See you next time.

Interview with Brian Leathem & Leslie Hinson from the PartternFly Project

 

 

In this interview, Jason Porter interviews Brian Leathem & Leslie Hinson from the PaternFly project. PatternFly is a community project that promotes design commonality and improved user experience. Its offerings include open source code, patterns, style guides and an active community that helps support it all. Watch the video to learn more!

 

Other News

 

 

 

New Releases

 

  • Hibernate Search 5.8.0 RC1. This is hoped to be the last release before 5.8.0 becomes final. So this will be the last opportunity for the community to test it and report bugs before the final release.
  • Vert.x 3.5.0.Beta1. This release comes with an implementation of the RxJava2 API, an MQTT client implementation and lots more.