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Weekly Editorial

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Welcome to a new edition of the JBoss Weekly Editorial. As summer comes closer on the northern hemisphere, the blue sky and sunny days do not appear to be able to hinder the community progress. No rest for the weary, ain't it? As proof, Red Hat just released Red Hat Fuse 7 - obviously built from the tremendous amount of work the Fuse community has put in the project in the last month (and releases).

 

Techbytes

 

We'll start this editorial by jumping directly into the a set of technical articles that have been released in the previous week. The first we would like to mention is The best way to write a Hibernate ORM issue test case . It will be of interest to anyone who would like to contribute a feature or a bug fix to the project, but also reveal an often under documented aspect a project: the testing framework.

 

Right after this one, let's go into something a bit more practical and take a deep look at how to Configure permissions using Elytron in WildFly 13. And, as long as we talk about our beloved app server, let's take a peak at What’s New in WildFly Management Console. Still related to Wildfly, we need to mention this interesting Introduction to Red Hat Application Migration Toolkit.

 

Events & Evangelist's Corner

 

As always, our own Eric D. Schabell has been active last week and has just released the slides of his talk at Shift Developer Conference 2018 on How to Jump Start a Career in Open Source. He was also in Scotland, just yesterday, to give a talk on Application Modernization and Migration Tech Talk at Scotland JBug Meetup Hopefully some of you living in the area will have had a chance to catch him!

 

Infinispan thanks Great Indian Developer Summit & Voxxed Days Zurich. His "world tour" of a sort is, of course, not finish, as he also attends our very own Red Hat Summit.

 

Releases, releases, releases

 

There is only one release we will mention in this section, for once, but it's a big one:  Red Hat Fuse 7 - Announcing Red Hat Fuse 7 GA!!

 

Decaf

 

Docker, and container in a more general sense, adoption have certainly increased a lot over the few last year. This adoption is also quite important in the Java and JBoss ecosystem, thus maybe this blog entry might be interesting to you too: How to install Red Hat CDK 3.4 on Fedora 28.

 

Hopefully, you have found something in this week's editorial to pique your interest and give you something to explore while waiting for next week's installment. Join us here next week for more news from the JBoss Community.

This is a smaller editorial this week, but by no means does that mean we haven’t been busy!

Releases

Blogs

As stated, this was a smaller one this week, but still, some great stuff happening! Everyone have a happy summer!

Welcome to another edition of the JBoss Editorial, our regular search through the JBoss Communities in search of interesting topic for all.

 

Updates from Red Hat Summit

 

Earlier this month saw the largest Red Hat Summit conference taking place in San Francisco's Moscone Convention Center, if you missed the conference or would like a recap then we have some good articles for you to read.

 

The first article of the week covers a presentation given by Marius Bogoevici and Christian Posta and entitled "An Eventful Tour from Enterprise Integration to Serverless", taking the audience on a tour covering the basic of Enterprise Integration through the microservices and serverless computing.

 

The second article covers a presentation given by Christian Posta entitled "Lowering the risk of monolith to microservices", discussing the journey of a fictitious company as they consider a pragmatic approach for moving their monolithic application over to a microservices architecture.

 

The third article takes us behind the scenes for a look at how sessions at such a large conference are scheduled and the part OptaPlanner played in optimising the agenda.  In the article Geoffrey covers not only the theoretical challenge to the task but also the practical challenges which arose as they worked towards the generation of the agenda.

 

Would you like to get a signed copy of the book "Effective Business Process Management with JBoss BPM"?  The author of the book, Eric Schabell, was signing and giving away copies at Summit and still has a few copies left.  Getting hold of a copy is easy, add a comment on the article sharing your JBoss BPM story and let Eric know you have done so via twitter.

 

Querying Debezium Change Data Events With KSQL

 

With Debezium's ability to turn database updates into an event stream, publishing the stream through Kafka Connect and allowing applications to respond near instantaneously to each committed change, we have a very powerful mechanism for monitoring and reacting to database changes and when coupled with KSQL, a streaming SQL engine build on Kafka Streams, it enables the ability to interactively process the Change Data Events as they arise.  For more information on this topic, as well as a demo showing how to start a KSQL instance, map KSQL streams to Debezium topics and repartioning of data, checkout Jiri's post.

 

Using the Contract Net Protocol in jBPM

 

The Contract Net Protocol allows multiple agents to announce and bid for contracts in order to complete an item of work, coordinating the execution of the work through an announcement/bidding/awarding process and can be modelled in jPBM through case definitions where individual phases of the protocol can be externalised via processes.

 

Apache Camel Language Support for Eclipse, VS Code and OpenShift.io

 

The Camel Language Server, enabling completion and documentation for camel URIs, is now available for download through the Eclipse and VS Code marketplaces as well as being available in OpenShift.io.  If you work with Camel on these platforms then take a look at Aurélien's article where he explains how to download and enable the plugins within each environment.

 

Hibernate Community Newsletter

 

The latest version of the Hibernate Community Newsletter is out with new articles from the Hibernate Community.  In this edition of the newsletter you will find articles explaining how JPA and hibernate can simplify data persistence, how to bootstrap JPA and Hibernate within Java SE, a beginner’s guide to Linearizability, mapping a ZonedDateTime, the Dirty Read phenomenon and many more.

 

Narayana JDBC Integration for Tomcat

 

If you are interested in using JTA capabilities within your tomcat deployment then take a look at Ondra's article discussing the integration of Narayana within tomcat.  Ondra discusses three different approaches to integration, examining the setup for the Narayana JDBC transactional driver, the Apache Commons DBCP2 library and lastly IronJacamar JCA.

 

JBoss Out and About

 

Eric Schabell will be visiting Edinburgh, Scotland on June 6th to give a workshop entitled "AppDev in the Cloud".

 

New Releases

 

 

That's all from this week's editorial, please join us again next week when we will take another spin through the JBoss Communities in search of interesting articles.

Sorry, we missed last week. We’re pulling double duty this week to get you all caught up on the latest with JBoss!

 

Red Hat Summit 2018

First, we would like to thank everyone who attended Red Hat Summit 2018 in San Francisco! This was a tremendous week full of amazing talks, keynotes, and fun! Middleware played a big role in many of the keynotes, which if you happened to miss are available on our YouTube channel. We hope you all enjoyed this year’s Summit as much as we did!

Welcome to another edition of the JBoss Editorial, our regular dip into the JBoss Communities to discover topics of interest to you all.

 

Red Hat Summit is finally here!

 

Next week sees many of us returning to San Francisco’s Moscone Center for this year's Red Hat Summit and OpenShift Commons events, taking place from Monday 7th May through to Thursday 10th May.  If you are visiting the area or attending either event then arrange a meet up with any of the developers and talk about your favourite projects.

 

While at Summit you may be interested in attending a hands-on lab to learn more about technologies which interest you, this year we have labs covering Cloud Native Applications, running OpenShift Container Platform on Azure and others.  Siamak, one of the presenters of the Cloud Native Applications lab, has a more detailed introduction covering the lab and what sessions you can expect.

 

Christian Posta will be giving a number of sessions at Red Hat Summit including

  • Istio with Zach Butcher
  • Evaluating when you should move to microservices
  • Messaging patterns, Event Driver Architecture and Functions as a Service with Marius Bogoevici

and finally a panel session with Louis Ryan and William Morgan discussing Service Meshes.

 

Eric Schabell, author of Effective Business Process Management with JBoss jBPM, will be joining a number of Red Hat authors during the week to meet developers, chat and sign copies of their books at the DevZone.  Stop by and meet your favourite author!

 

JBoss EAP Continuous Delivery

 

The JBoss EAP team have recently made available the JBoss EAP Continuous Delivery stream for developers providing faster access to new features, a focus on Cloud features and integration with OpenShift and its container workflows with free access for development through the Red Hat Developer Program.

 

DevNation Live: Jakarta EE

 

This week's DevNation Live Tech Talk saw Dr. Mark Little and our host Burr Sutter discuss "Jakarta EE: The Future of Java EE".  While the event has already taken place the talk has been recorded so you can catch up on the likely direction of Jakarta EE and how you can help to drive its future.

 

Istio and Egress

 

In the ninth part of his Introduction to Istio series, Don introduces us to the concept of Egress and how this can be used to provide access to external services from service running within the Istio service mesh.

 

Eclipse Che's Plans for 2018

 

With 2018 already well under way Stevan recaps the work already delivered by the Eclipse Che team and how to find out about their upcoming roadmap for the remainder of the year.

 

Infinispan moves to Zulip

 

The Infinispan team have recently moved their developer chat from IRC to Zulip, if you are in regular contact with the development team then make sure you join them on the Infinispan Zulip Organisation.

 

JBoss Out and About

 

Over the last month and a half Galder has been giving sessions at both Javaland and Devoxx France.  Galder's presentation at Javaland explored a number of Java RPC frameworks from the perspective of Infinispan's Remote API, evaluating which could be a good candidate for Infinispan should the need arise.  At Devoxx France Galder first teamed up with Clement Escoffier from the Vert.x team to deliver a 3 hour session on streaming data analysis, they both then teamed up with Google's Ray Tsang to deliver a 3 hour streaming data hands-on workshop.

 

New Releases

 

 

That's all for this week, please join us next week when we will bring you more news from Red Hat Summit and the JBoss Communities.

Continuing from last week, thank you, Mark, we have a number of jBPM related posts this week. There are also some related Hibernate posts. Shall we start with releases?

 

Releases

Both of these are bug fix releases.

 

Blogs

Nicola Ferraro posted a very well thought out and in-depth article about the Saga pattern in Apache Camel (version 2.21.0 or higher). Not familiar with the Saga pattern, not sure when, or how you would use it, this blog is for you. Head on over to his blog to learn more.

 

Eric Schabell has been on the West Coast of the USA for a few weeks. While there, he was invited to speak at the Portland Java User Group (PJUG). If you weren’t one of the lucky 29 people in attendance, that isn’t a problem. You can hit the recap and see his slides over on his blog.

 

Vlad Mihalcea released the weekly Hibernate Community Newsletter a few days ago. It highlights a number of articles, releases, and Q&A for the Hibernate suite of projects. Certainly worth a glance to get back up to speed with the latest happenings within that community!

 

As stated earlier, jBPM had a number of blog posts this past week. Two of them (http://mswiderski.blogspot.com/2018/04/jbpm-work-items-repository-tips-tricks.html and http://mswiderski.blogspot.com/2018/04/jbpm-work-items-are-really-simple.html) relate to Work items. Work items are the way to build custom services which can be used within a process. Maciej teaches more in the mentioned blog posts. He also wrote about KIE Server custom queries in jBPM 7.8. Lastly, there’s a recap of bpmNEXT 2018 Day 3 over on Kris Verlaenen’s blog.

 

We hope you have enjoyed this week’s JBoss Weekly editorial! We also look forward to seeing you at Red Hat Summit 2018 in San Francisco!

There has been a lot of BPM related activity this relatively quiet week.

 

jBPM Lead Kris Verlaenen has written an article about his attendance of bpmNEXT 2018. In fact it was such a good day 1 that he had to span it across two articles! Kris also followed up with a couple of entries on day 2 activities. Meanwhile Edson Tirelli has written a complimentary piece that points out videos to the various sessions so everyone can enjoy.

 

Also this week Eric has been talking about how easy it is to install OpenShift Container Platform 3.9 as well as part 3 of his series on the Open Innovation Labs residencies.

 

Christian writes about the book he and Burr Sutter have written about Istio Service Mesh and which has just been released. Congrats guys!

 

Finally Hibernate OGM 5.4.0 Alpha 1 is out and the Keycloak team are conducting a questionnaire for users so please look at it.

 

OK that's it for this week!

It's that time of year again and the Red Hat Summit conference in San Francisco is rapidly approaching. Expect to see a flurry of product and project releases, over the coming weeks, as the teams prepare to announce their latest and greatest offerings.

 

If you're planning on attending Red Hat Summit, you can read here, to get a preview of the sessions covering modern application development.

 

 

In the first part of this series James Falkner explores the Istio project and how Red Hat is actively involved, working to integrate it into Kubernetes and OpenShift. This integration brings the benefits of a service mesh to our customers and the wider communities involved.

 

In this post Don Schenck talks about testing for failures in your distributed application. Testing how your application responds to network unreliability is traditionally very hard to do. However, in this post Don shows how this can be done with ease by injecting faults into your application running in an Istio service mesh.

 

In the fourth post of Clement Escoffier's “Introduction to Eclipse Vert.x.” series, he shows how you can use JDBC in an Eclipse Vert.x application using the asynchronous API provided by the vertx-jdbc-client. But before diving into JDBC and other SQL subtleties, Clement provides a primer on Vert.x Futures.

 

In a few weeks, on 24 April 2018, Eric Schabell will be visiting the Portland, Oregon Java User Group (known as PJUG). Here Eric will deliver a workshop where attendees will get started with containers, Cloud and some examples so that you have your own private PaaS Cloud on your laptop. You'll be given a private Cloud in minutes that turns your laptop into a container platform where you then can explore a multitude of example projects from such domains as retail, travel, finance and more. You can read more and sign up for the event here.

 

You can also catch Eric at DevConf.us 2018. In this post Eric previews the talks and workshops he'll be giving.

In this post Michal Petrov gives a status update on the RichFaces community. Red Hat stopped contributing to the RichFaces codebase almost two years ago, however there are still many people using the technology. In this post Michal talks about what the RichFaces community are doing to continue to support those users.

 

 

New Releases

  • Hibernate Search 5.10.0.Beta2. This release mainly includes an upgrade to WildFly 12 for the JBoss modules, but it also adds a few bug-fixes and improvements
  • WildFly Swarm 2018.4.1
  • Byteman 4.0.2. This is the latest release for use on JDK9+ runtimes. It is also recommended as the preferred release for use on JDK8- runtimes.

With the Winter finaly deciding to move on (a bit - or at least where I am) and the Easter holiday season, we have missed a couple of editorial! And for that, we truly apologize. However, the JBoss Community did not take a rest and quite a lot of happens in the last weeks. We'll endeavor to cover of lot that in this special "catch up" issue of the editorial!

 

ostern

 

Techbytes


Architectural Considerations

If there is two things trending in the last years, it is for sure Microservice and Security (and yes, Docker, but don't get me started on this). And this why this recent article discussing How a Service Mesh Can Help With Microservices Security is particularly interesting and compelling. On the other side of this spectrum, this other article discuss of the merits of Spreading Freedom with Mainframe.

 

"Learn Things"

If there is a trait that any member of the JBoss Community shares (or at least should) is curiosity. We are always one for learning new things. And the last weeks have seen a series of articles being released that are perfectly designed to quench our thirst. First, this Getting Started with Red Hat Decision Manager 7 will give you the opportunity to explore the world of OptaPlanner by running a simple demo on OpenShift.

 

Then, you can move on learning about Single Sign-On Made Easy with Keycloak / Red Hat SSO. Pretty neat, isn't it? Last but not the least, I've found this article on Spec API Modularity Patterns surprisingly interesting, go check it out!

 

Springbooting your Camel Ride ...

 

desert shade

If you have been meaning to explore Springboot and/or Camel, the last weeks have provided with some excellent material to do so. First of all, Claus Ibsen released his talk at DevNation on Apache Camel: Camel Riders in the Cloud (30 minute video). From there, you can naturally move to Writing Your First Camel Spring Boot Project With the Rest DSL. As no serious application should not be developed without proper testing, you will be able to move quite naturally to the following article on Unit Testing for Camel Rest DSL and Spring Boot.

 

Once there, you may even want to spice things up by Setting Up a Failover Scenario Using Apache Camel ZooKeeper. And the, if you feel your Camel/Springboot app is be ready to be released, you can even give it a try on Openshift following this article on Deploying a Spring Boot App with MySQL on OpenShift.

 

... or Vert.xing things out

 

Vortex

If Springboot and Camel are not your things - or simply if you are thirsthy for more, you also have the opportunity to dive into Vert.x. Indeed, following his introduction article from a few weeks ago, Clément Escoffier released a new one, focusing on Vert.x Application Configuration. From there you can easily extend your exploration to learning Some Rest with Vert.x and even investigate how to set up Clustering Vert.x with Infinispan.

 

Winter may be on the way out, but it is still time to Hibernate!

 

The Hibernate community is a large subset of our own community. Tracking its own activities can be a challenged and this is why, as always, we strongly recommend you take a peek at the Hibernate Community Newsletter 06/2018 which is a perfect way to do so!

 

Evangelist's Corner

As always, our own Eric D.Schabell have kept himself quite busy in the last weeks and released some quite interesting content. First of all, he kept going on with his guide for the upcoming Red Hat Summit and covered this time the Red Hat Summit 2018 Labs: Hands-on with Security. He also released the second part of his article on Inside Open Innovation Labs Residency (Part 2). Last but not the least, he released the first part of a new article on 3 Pitfalls Everyone Should Avoid with Hybrid Multicloud (Part 1). Please, go check all those out and enjoy !

 

People Section

A community, especially one as old as JBoss, is most of all made of the people contributing to it. This is why we would like to acknowledge some people in this editorial's edition. First of all, let's congratulate Claus Ibsen (@davsclaus) on his 10 Years as Apache Camel committer ! It is no small achievement. We also would like to extend our welcome to the community to Mark Rotteveel!

 

Releases, releases, releases...

 

With almost three weeks of backlog, it will come to no surprise to anyone reading this editorial that we have quite a large bunch of releases to mention here:

 

Hopefully, you have found something in this week's editorial to pique your interest and give you something to explore while waiting for next week's installment. Join us here next week for more news from the JBoss Community.

Welcome to a new edition of the JBoss Weekly Editorial! It's freezing and snowing in the Northern Hemisphere, but this has not hinder the progress of the JBoss community and its numerous project. Also, the Red Hat Summit (8-10 May) is on the horizon, so it's time to prepare for it!

 

Microprofiling and OpenAPI with Swarm

 

With the latest release of Wildfly Swarm, one has an excellent opportunity to test out the OpenAPI microprofile that has been introduced a few years back. So if you ever wanted to dabble into setting up your own API service, go on and check this out!

 

Evangelist's Corner - The Red Hat Summit

 

As mentioned above, the Red Hat Summit is around the corner! It's less than a couple of month away! If you have the chance to attend it, you should definitely checked out this Ultimate Guide to Red Hat Summit 2018 Labs on Hands-on with Linux Containers done by Eric. D Schabell. This will help start preparing for the event, especially if you want to focus on Docker container.

 

Hibernate Community

 

As often mentioned here, the Hibernate community is a huge part of the JBoss Community but also its own thriving ecosystem on its own. That's why there is nothing better than this monthly Hibernate Community Newsletter (05/2018) to keep up with them...

 

Everything Eclipse Vert.x

 

Vert.x ist a trending technology for a little while, but maybe you did not have time (yet) to jump on the wagon. Well, you're in for a treat, as Clément Escoffier just released a very nice Introduction to Eclipse Vert.x - My First Vert.x Application ! Go check it !

 

And if you are already on board the Vert.x train, there is an excellent upcoming opportunity for you. Indeed, even if Winter is still crippling the Northern Hemisphere, Spring are Summer are getting closer and closer, which also means that the Google Summer of Code 2018 is also coming. And the Eclipse Vert.x is looking for submission!

 

Releases, releases, releases...

 

And as always, last week so a fair amount of releases from some rather important project of the JBoss community:

 

Decaf'

Before concluding the editorial, let's leave a bit the Java ecosystem and take a look at what happened around it last week. In this regard, I think that the following announcement of pretty cool: Node.js General Availability in Red Hat OpenShift Application Runtimes. If you are interested in Node.js application I think you will find that having runtimes on OpenShift for you is going to be an excellent way to put your apps in the cloud.

 

Hopefully, you have found something in this week's editorial to pique your interest and give you something to explore while waiting for next week's installment. Join us here next week for more news from the JBoss Community.

This week, uncharacteristically, has had few releases, but a number of blog posts! Great news for our readers. Welcome to another edition of the JBoss Weekly Editorial!

 

Releases

Three releases happened this past week:

Each of these releases contains a number of bug fixes and features. Hibernate 5.2.15.Final and Hibernate Validator 6.0.8.Final are both drop-in replacements for the previous versions. The update to Debezium should also be a drop in replacement, but blog post doesn’t specifically call it out.

 

Blogs

The blogs this week are based on three main categories:

  • Infinispan
  • Cloud/Microservices

  • General

 

The Inifinispan Team would like to introduce you all to the HotSwig project. Read more about it at http://blog.infinispan.org/2018/03/a-swig-based-framework-to-build-hotrod.html. HotSwig allows you to build a Hotrod client prototype based on SWIG. This is a great project if you want to use Hotrod with a language which doesn’t have its own dedicated Hotrod client.

 

Galder Zamarreño has some help for those of you using Infinispan in Docker on a Mac. It can be difficult to access Inifinspan due to a known issue with the internal IP address not being accessible externally. If you’ve fought with this issue, be sure to see the workaround proposed at http://blog.infinispan.org/2018/03/accessing-infinispan-inside-docker-for.html.

 

HTTP is very well used and well-known protocol today. Less well known and used is HTTP/2. In his blog post, Sebastian Łaskawiec tackles getting started with Inifinspan and HTTP/2. Read http://blog.infinispan.org/2018/03/rest-with-http2.html if you’re interested.

Vinay Bhalerao is starting a series about 3Scale and Identity Management. In this first post, Vinay introduces the use case and some basic details. Head over to the Red Hat Developers blog post for the whole article: https://developers.redhat.com/blog/2018/03/06/redhat-3scale-identity-management/

 

Antoine Sabot-Durand over on the Red Hat Developers blog introduces you to the Eclipse MicroProfile Fault Tolerance specification and subsequent implementation in Wildfly Swarm. You may be familiar with Hystrix or Failsafe. The specification provides you with a standard API to use and stay loosely coupled to the third party libraries. It’s great to see some standardization in this area!

 

If you haven’t heard of Istio, or are curious to learn more, read Don Schenck’s blog post introducing Istio. Don does a great job doing a quick introduction and high-level overview of Istio and service mesh.

Jeff Mesnil expands on how the MicroProfile 1.2 release can be used by Java developers writing microservices on OpenShift. https://developers.redhat.com/blog/2018/03/05/cloud-native-microprofile-config-healthcheck-openshift/ is decently in-depth and gives you a great starting place to leverage all the latest and greatest from MicroProfile 1.2

 

Eric Schabell recently launched his new book, Effective Business Process Management with JBoss BPM! He blogged about it over at http://www.schabell.org/2018/03/book-launced-effective-business-process-management-with-jboss-bpm.html. It will be a great addition for anyone getting started or looking for some more information about Business Process Management!

 

Wildfly 12 introduced some CLI tools for keystore manipulation. This is great news for anyone tired of trying to do all of that by hand. Our very own Farah Juma recently blogged about the new capabilities over on her blog: https://developer.jboss.org/people/fjuma/blog/2018/03/02/manipulating-keystores-using-the-cli-in-wildfly-12.

 

To finish off our week, many of us at Red Hat and also out in the community, are gearing up for Red Hat Summit 2018! Mike Guerrette gives us the rundown on a number of excellent talks and speakers over on the Red Hat Developer Blog: https://developers.redhat.com/blog/2018/03/07/red-hat-summit-2018-focus-modern-app-development/. There are so many good things happening at Red Hat Summit this year! We’re all looking forward to seeing you there!

 

Thanks again for coming back to another edition of the JBoss Weekly Editorial!

WildFly 12 is Here!

This is WildFly's first release following our new quarterly delivery model. As part of this plan, we are delivering EE8 functionality in fully completed incremental chunks, as opposed to waiting for everything to finish in a big bang release. WildFly 12 makes significant progress on this front, adding support for the majority of the new standards. Read on to find out more details.

 

Java EE is now Jakarta EE

As you may already know, Java EE recently found a new home at the Eclipse Foundation. Shortly after the move, the community voted on a new name and Jakarta EE was selected. Here's what Mark Little and David Blevins have to say about the rename.

 

SLA Tracking in jBPM

In this post Maciej Swiderski explains how to track your SLAs in jBPM 7.7. He also followed up this week with another post explaining how to react to SLA violations using jBPM 7.7.

 

Keycloak and Istio

This week Sébastien Blanc explains how to combine Keycloak with Istio.

 

Bean Validation 2.0

This week Gunnar Morling posted two presentations that introduce you to what's new in the Bean Validation 2.0 specification. He also followed up with a description of the most significant feature in Bean Validation 2.0 (JSR 380): the support for container element constraints.

 

Releases

OK so this week seems to have been the time many of our projects have made a release. We've got Hibernate (Search 5.10.0 Beta 1, OGM 5.3.0 Final and of course the usual community newsletter), Arquillian (Smart Testing 0.0.9, ShrinkWrap Resolver 3.1.3, Container WebSphere 1.0.0 CR1 and Tomcat Container 1.0.1 Final), Byteman 4.0.1, WildFly 12.0.0 Beta 1, Camel In Action 2 (book signing and tower building!) and Infinispan 9.2.0 CR3. Phew!

 

Amongst all of that, the Hibernate team still had time to talk about the JPA 2.2 standard as it applies to the project. Will Burns spoke about distributed iteration improvements in the latest Infinispan, which is definitely worth reading if you are interested in distributed streams. And Christian Posta has written one of his usual brilliant articles, this time around Istio and traffic shadowing for microservices.

 

However, we leave a special shout-out to Mario Fusco who is illustrating how Voxxed Days Zurich 2018 is being scheduled using our very own OptaPlanner! A really great example of real world use of an open source project/product!

 

OK that's it for this week!

Welcome to another edition of the JBoss Weekly Editorial, our regular spin through the JBoss Communities in search of interesting news we can bring straight to you.

 

Renaming Java EE

 

We begin this week's editorial with news from the Eclipse foundation where there is a poll running to determine the new Java EE brand name.  With many names being suggested by the community the next challenge for the EE4J PMC was to reduce the list to those suggestions which were still options once all legal, patent and IP checks had been made, this dramatically pruned the list down to two.  The choice for the new Java EE brand names are now "Jakarta EE" and "Enterprise Portal" and this is a decision you can take part in.  The poll is remaining open until February 23rd so you have a week left to cast your vote!

 

Please don't stop after having submitted your vote, if you have an interest in what is happening within Java EE then you should also consider joining the EE.next Working Group.

 

New jBPM Service Repository, interacting with email and developing within IntelliJ

 

With the release of jBPM 7.6.0 the team has introduced a major update to their service repository.  The update includes many new integration services introducing support for Dropbox, Google services, IFTTT, Twitter, GitHub and others as well as dedicated documentation pages for each workitem describing parameters, dependencies etc. and more.

 

Interacting with email is a common requirement for many process developers, perhaps a user interacting with a process flow via email, starting process instances from an email or uploading documents as part of a process.  To demonstrate how these capabilities could be integrated within jBPM, Maciej has created an example process, handlers and recorded a video showing what is possible.  If you are interested in these features then please provide feedback to the team as they look to integrate the capabilities within jBPM.

 

If you are a developer working on the workbench then you may be interested in running it within IntelliJ using the GWT plugin, this will help to speed up your development workflow by taking advantage of the live reloading capabilities within the IDE.

 

Hibernate, SAP HANA and Repeating JPA Annotations

 

The release of Hibernate ORM 5.2.12 introduced improved support for SAP HANA, enabling all features of the Hibernate ORM Framework and backed by the SAP HANA team. For more information on the integration and its capabilities check out Jonathan Bregler's introduction on the SAP HANA capabilities and also his interview by Vlad where he covers his experiences within the SAP HANA team, the capabilities of their product and his thoughts on Hibernate and the integrating with Hibernate ORM.

 

JPA 2.2 introduces support for the Java 8 repeating annotations feature, greatly simplifying the use of JPA annotations within our applications.  Hibernate 5.2 had introduced support for repeating hibernate specific annotations but with Hibernate 5.3 supporting JPA 2.2 this will now be extended to cover the JPA specific annotations.  For a simple comparison and explanation of the new capabilities check out Vlad's post on the subject.

 

Traffic Shadowing in Istio

 

The istio platform provides many capabilities to support intelligent routing, load balancing, resiliency, telemetry and policy enforcement including the ability to mirror traffic from one live service to another in order to provide additional testing for a deployment before a decision is made to release.  In his next article on Istio, Christian Posta introduces us to the concepts of mirroring, discusses how RouteRules can be configured to mirror traffic to a second service and presents a demonstration showing how this works in practice.

 

Camel in Action 2nd Edition Released

 

Earlier this month Manning Publications announced the release of the Camel in Action 2nd Edition, an update to the original edition written by Claus Ibsen and Jonathan Anstey.  The book is currently available in PDF format with eBook and Kindle formats scheduled for release on February 23rd.

 

Keycloak and Angular CLI

 

For those developing applications using Angular CLI, Stan has developed a nice schematic which will allow you to simplify the integration of Keycloak with your application.  There are only a few steps needed to install Keycloak into your application, once done this will provide you with many features including login/logout, account management, the ability to protect specific routes and much more.

 

Upcoming Infinispan 9.2 Features

 

The upcoming release of Infinispan 9.2 introduces numerous new features and improvements on existing functionality.  One important feature being introduced will be the ability to invoke queries over HTTP, including mapping from protobuf to and from JSON to improve storage requirements, simplifying the client side requirements while retaining compatibility with other clients such as the HotRod C++/C# clients.  Other important changes involve the reintroduction of the eviction strategy within the data container as well as improvements to reduce the size of off heap memory allocations and improve the accuracy of their size estimates.

 

Custom HTTP Authentication with Elytron

 

The Elytron subsystem provides support for custom HTTP authentication mechanisms, allowing you to override the configuration of applications and force their authentication through your custom mechanism.  If you are interested in this topic check out Darran's tutorial where he demonstrates how to develop a custom authentication mechanism and how it can be applied to those applications needing to be secured.

 

JBoss Out and About

 

Eric Schabell has been very interested in the Shift Developer Conference over the years and this year he will finally have an opportunity to attend Shift Developer Conference 2018 in Split, Croatia on May 31st and June 1st.  Eric has submitted six proposals for presentations covering some of the softer skills within the Open Source universe as well as his current passion with AppDev in the Cloud.

 

New Releases

 

 

That's all for this week's edition of the JBoss Weekly Editorial, please join us for our next editorial when we will once again take a tour of the JBoss Communities in search of articles and interesting discussions.

Welcome, everyone to month two of 2018! There have been some exciting things in the world during this past week. We’re excited to bring to you our round-up of the week in Red Hat Middleware!

CoreOS

The first announcement we have isn’t really middleware related, but it is certainly part of the larger Red Hat family. Many of you may have seen the announcement a few days ago about CoreOS and Red Hat. Yes, it is true, Red Hat is acquiring CoreOS. We believe this will further Red Hat’s stance and leadership within the Kubernetes community. For additional Q&A outside the official announcement, linked above, there is an FAQ posted over on the Red Hat blog.

Releases

Let’s move along and take a look at releases within Middleware:

Blogs

The Infinispan team is getting the word out about executing code in the grid. This allows you to really put that Inifinispan/JDG cluster to work and do more than provide fast caching, which of course is nothing to scoff about. If you have data in that grid, use Infinispan to reason about and execute those questions in the grid!

 

The Hibernate Newsletter came out yesterday. Read about their community over on the blog post. You’ll find information about releases, Stack Overflow questions, forum posts and other blog posts from their community.

In keeping with the current theme of data, the Teiid team would like people to know about Teiid Spring Boot. This will allow you to use Teiid without the need of setting up a server if you’re using Spring Boot. This solution will be a great addition to your microservices toolbox!

Lastly for data, if you are familiar with Microsoft SQL Server and OpenShift, you can now use them together! Over on the Developer Blog, Takayoshi Tanaka blogged about using SQL Server on OpenShift. It runs SQL Server on RHEL within OpenShift. Head on over and learn how to get started!

 

Our own Christian Posta, evaluates Envoy and Istio circuit breaking with Netflix Hystrix over on his blog. Circuit breaking is a great tool to use if you’re talking to services within your application. You never know when something is going to go down, and your application breaking because of some dependency down the line isn’t always acceptable. Hystrix is often thought of as "the standard" in doing circuit breakers. It’s a great primer and dive into two different solutions!

Yesterday was another DevNation Live session. This session focused on Istio canaries and k8s (Kubernetes). If you missed the live feed and would like to catch up, feel free to watch it on YouTube!

Thanks for staying with us for another week!