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Weekly Editorial

49 Posts authored by: Romain Pelisse

Welcome back to this new installment of the JBoss Weekly Editorial! It's been almost a month since the last one, so obviously, a lot as happens, but you'll try to catch you up as much as we can. There was a lot activity in many projects of the JBoss ecosystem, but this editorial puts the focus on Quarkus, still our newest baby, and Camel, reaching its version 3 very soon!

 

Camel 3.0

Apache Camel LogoApache Camel is thriving projects that have been around quite a while now. So it's not surprising that Apache Camel 3 is only 2 months away! To be ready for it, maybe you want to brush up on your Camel skills by following "Riding the Apache Camel", an Upcoming Webinar focusing on Integration Patterns in a Serverless World?

 

If you are a user of CodeMirror, you will be very happy about  Apache Camel Language support in CodeMirror. If you are more into Visual Studio, then look at this cool tutorial on Sending a telegram with Apache Camel K and Visual Studio Code. Either way, you'll have something Camelee to play with!

 

Quarkus

 

Quarkus Banner

Quarkus has been released only a few months and its launch has triggered a lot of integration projects along with demo apps and workshops. Some of the content released, focuses on high-level architectural considerations.  Such as the article released by  Narayana team  on Software Transactional Memory with Quarkus or this other one focused on Event-driven business automation powered by cloud-native Java . Some tutorial, more focused on practical problems, were also released during the last week. Noteworthy is the one on How the new Quarkus extension for Visual Studio Code improves the development experience and the one on Autowire MicroProfile into Spring with Quarkus.

 

 

Evangelist's Corner

As always, our very own Eric D. Schabell has been quite prolific in the last weeks. He released his workshop delivered during the DevOpsDays Raleigh 2019 - Creating Real DevOps Heroes (workshop) along with Getting Started with Cloud Native Development on OpenShift Container Platform (webinar). Last, but not the least, he will also deliver a presentation during Red Hat Forum Poland - Keynote and a Journey Through 3 Pitfalls in November. If you are anywhere nearby Warsaw, in Poland, go check it out!

 

Techbytes

With more than three weeks with an editorial, it’s no surprise that there is a lot of content to check out. Let’s start first by this intriguing Introduction to microservices observability with Eclipse MicroProfile . Once you are be done with this one, maybe you will like to look into even more esoteric discussion with this article on Heuristic exceptions. Assuming those two have not yet quench your thirst, you may have two in-depth articles on Kogito coming your way. First is an intro to Kogito, to get you well situated, and then we will dvelve into the Etymology of Kogito.. Pretty neat, isn't it?

 

OpenShift

 

OpenShift is awesome some platform for developers to deploy and experiment with products (and also, of course, for production). The JBoss ecosystem is, of course, no stranger to it and thus there was quite a handful of content published about it in the last weeks. Let's start here with a tutorial on how to Deploy Red Hat AMQ Streams and Fuse on OpenShift Container Platform 4. If you want more about AMQ, you may follow up with this other tutorial on 4 steps to set up the MQTT secure client for Red Hat AMQ 7.4 on OpenShift .


If you want to explore more in depth the infrastructure behind OpenShift, you can start by following this tutorial on how to write a simple Kubernetes Operator in Java using the Fabric8 Kubernetes Client . Along those lines, the following article on Using Red Hat OpenShift image streams with Kubernetes deployments might also be in your interest.

 

That's all for this week's edition of the Editorial, please join us next time as we continue our journey through the JBoss Communities in search of interesting articles and news.

Welcome back to this new installment of the JBoss Weekly Editorial. This week our main guest star is the newly released Jakarta EE 8! And now, on with the show!

 

Jakarta EE 8

 

Jakarta EE Logo

 

Certainly, the most important news in the last week for the JBoss community has been the release of Jakarta EE 8. This new version has set the path for Wildfly, but will also drive changes and new features in numerous projects in our ecosystem. We can’t cover this announcement in detail in the editorial, but please do check out this excellent sum-up from Rhuan Rocha, if you want to know more. In timely manner, Rhuan had also released the previous week an article on Why Java Is So Hot Right, Now? The Java community at large has been taunted for almost two decades by the imminent death of the language and its technology, always prophesied to be replaced by whatever new shiny language just came out. But with the stubbornness of the Discworld’s giant turtle, Java just keeps carrying on. With the release of Jakarta EE 8 and project like Quarkus focusing on providing a framework for microservices in Java, it’s quite an interesting time to step back and remember why Java has been so successful and why it may remain as successful in the future.

 

TechBytes - Quarkus

Quarkus Logo

 

Released only a few months ago, Quarkus has kept up with healthy pace producing new version on a regular basis. If you have yet to take a look at this brilliantly innovative new application framework, dedicated to microservices implementation, go check out Burr Sutter’s video, it will catch you up perfectly! And to go deeper and farther, take a look then at this pretty cool Cloud-native messaging app (on OpenShift), built with Quarkus and AMQ Online. And if you like what you say there with AMQP, maybe this other article on building a CDC pipeline with AMQ streams (and Fuse) might also worth a look.

 

Keycloak & Wildlfy, it's all about security, baby

 

Security in application has been a rising concern for years now, so it’s no surprise to see new security features appears in Wildfly 18. Along with those, you can also take a look at the enhanced audit logging capabilities of the server. While those new features are certainly already nice to have, don’t think that server developers are done on this topic, far from it. Just announced is an upcoming automatic update of credential stores. Nowadays, the backbone of security is (IMHO) Single Sign On. So, in order to what you could achieve in the domain in the next years, take a look at Keycloak’s roadmap.

 

Evangelist's Corner

 

Eric D.Schabell kept on releasing his series entitled: “5 Questions Everyone’s Asking About Microservices”. The last two weeks the saw last two installments, Question 4 and Question 5, being published. If you’ve been waiting for them to be all out to binge’m like the latest season of your favorite TV Show, the time has arrived!

 

Décaf'

 

Enough java’s beans for you? You already got the jitters? Let’s cool off by looking at how the application monitoring operator works on OpenShift

 

That's all for this week's edition of the Editorial, please join us next time as we continue our journey through the JBoss Communities in search of interesting articles and news.

One of the latest and most innovative releases of our community has certainly been Quarkus. The project was published just a few months ago and it’s not surprising that it is now the topic of many materials being released in the few weeks. But especially this week, we are lucky not to have just another article or blog post, but several video presentations all discussing using Quarkus in very different context. Enjoy!

 

Quarkus - Live from DevNation

In the previous weeks, a few online presentations—part of the Live From DevNation series, were released and are bound to be of interest for many of you, readers, as they all focus on the latest, shiny and bright little gem of our community, Quarkus:

 

Kogito Ergo Cloud

 

The Kogito initiative is an ongoing effort to bring Drools to the cloud. To demonstrate how the rule engine fits into such an environment, the project contributors have launched a series of articles in the last weeks. The first installment was called Drools & jBPM: Kogito, ergo Rules — Part 1: Bringing Drools Further and its followup Drools & jBPM: Kogito, ergo Rules — Part 2: An All-Encompassing Execution Model for Rules  is now available too! Obviously, those two articles will be a perfect warm-up to the previously mentioned video presentation DevNation Live: Introducing Kogito .

 

3Scale your way into CI/CD

In the last weeks, a very nice series of articles on 3Scale have been released. Nicely organized, their use cases or example are around the topics of CI/CD using Jenkins and thus they form a nice, practical and very concrete example on how to use 3Scale:

 

Evangelist's Corner

As always, our very own Eric D.Schabell has not forgotten the JBoss Community and he released a new Beginners Guide - Building an Online Retail Web Shop Workshop (Guided Rules).

 

Decaf'

Enough about Quarkus, Drools and other Java technologies? Feel like trying something else or look at some other cool stuff, that could help you in your daily work. Well, you're in luck, last week, a very cool article on Controlling Red Hat OpenShift from an OpenShift pod was released. This is bound to be nifty, isn't it? But if OpenShift is not your jam, don't worry, we also this nice overview of Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8.1 Beta new development tools .

 

That's all for this week's edition of the Editorial, please join us next time as we continue our journey through the JBoss Communities in search of interesting articles and news.

Welcome to a new installment of the JBoss Weekly Editorial! (Which is now released every two weeks, but let’s not get sidetrack by that). The biggest news is for sure IBM and Mark Little have commented on that on his blog, but don’t worry, there is also plenty of more technical or community-related news for you!

 

Big Purple

 

The times, they are changing ! As you must be aware by now, IBM bought Red Hat, as announced a few months ago. The purchase being finalized, there is now an ocean of questions (and, to be honest, opportunities for collaboration) arising. I wish we could have all the answers to your question, but, hopefully, this blog entry from Mark Little, we still answer some for you.

 

Techbytes

 

A few interesting articles have been released in the past week. First is about Drools & jBPM: Kogito, ergo Rules — Part 1: Bringing Drools Further . It is to be noted that the Kogito project aims at providing the best possible cloud integration to both Drools & jPBM, so if you have any interest in both topics, you should certainly check this one out!

 

The next one is very exciting. I've been a fan of JGroups since I've been introduced to the frameworks back in 2005 (gosh, I'm not getting younger).  It has been the backbone of the JBoss Clustering solution for decades now, but the framework was also often leverage in cutting project. And now that Bela Ban released this article on Compiling JGroups to native code with Quarkus/GraalVM, I'm sure the possibilities unlocked with both Quarkus and JGroups are going to be endless!

 

Still not enough? Still craving for more technological babble to impress your friends at dinner parties? Well, then take a look at this one: Debezium Apache Kafka connectors for Change Data Capture (CDC).

 

Java Tooling

Despite the decade-long rumors of Java upcoming death, the corpse still appears to be moving and thriving. The zombie language even appears to learn new tricks or rather get new swagger, as illustrated by the 17-million downloads of Visual Studio Code Java extension.

But rest assure, if you are still not feeling comfortable coding Java in Visual Code, you can get started with Red Hat CodeReady Studio 12.12.0.GA and JBoss Tools 4.12.0.Final for Eclipse.

 

Evangelist's Corner

 

For the summer (well, summer in the northern hemisphere), Eric D. Schabell re-released an updated version of his classic 3 More Pitfalls Everyone Should Avoid with Hybrid Multicloud (slides). If you missed it the last time around, you have another chance to check it out! He also released a new Beginners Guide on "Building an Online Retail Web Shop Workshop (Domain Model)".

Releases, releases, releases... Infinispan version!

 

The Infinispan project has been quite busy in the last days. They released a new version of the core project, along with a new version of the Infinispan Operator. Take a look!

With something things happening lately, we have (again) missed an editorial two weeks ago! All our apology about that, but this one will catch you up if you have missed anything. No surprise, only a few weeks after its releases, Quarkus, and its beloved friend, GraalVM, are still the center of the attention! (as it should be!!!)

The smoking gun of a newborn star

Quarkus and GraalVM

With its recent releases, Quarkus is certainly a trending item! Especially when we see how far the project can go with coupled with GraalVM. And this potential is certainly leading to some exciting experiments like: Adventures in GraalVM: polyglot Camel (k) native routes with Quarkus, or Towards a Polyglot Drools on GraalVM (with Bonus Tech-Lead Prank)!

 

Quarkus being a very new and innovative context of execution for an application, it is to be expected for people to try to migrate their own application. If you plan to do so, this article on Migrating Java applications to Quarkus: Lessons learned is a “must-read”! After that, you may want to take a look at this one From zero to Quarkus and Knative: The easy way. With those two articles, you should be set to go even further in your exploration of Quarkus!

 

Note: If you happen to be able to read french, note that I will also release an article on Quarkus in next month’s issue of GNU/Linux Magazine France.

Retrospective on the bmpNEXT

If you are interested in rules engines and processes manager, but you happen to had no chance to join the bpmNEXT conference last week, here a few impressions for you (along with some teasing about our upcoming Red Hat Summit):

Still relating to rules, especially, in this case, drools, we also mentioned above, in the section about Quarkus, this quite cool article  Drools & jBPM: drools.js: Towards a Polyglot Drools on GraalVM (with Bonus Tech-Lead Prank) ! We’ve repeated here so to be sure you don’t miss it !

Evangelist's Corner

As always, our own Eric D. Schabell has been quite prolific, especially has he has joined several conferences:

On top of this material, he also took the time to promote upcoming labs at the Red Hat Summit 2019 (7–9 May):

Last, but certainly not the least, don’t forget to catch up with the Infinispan project, if you have the opportunity, on the Infinispan on tour, March-April 2019!

Techbytes

This editorial is already quite a mouthful, but maybe you can stomach a bit more? If so, take a look the following entries:

Releases, releases, releases…

As always, the JBoss community can go two weeks without a fair amount of new releases. Among the most notable, there is, of course, a new minor version of Quarkus, but also a first major released of Keycloak!

Décaf’

 

After digesting that much Java technologies, you are maybe craving for something else, right? Well, let us offer you a nice Introduction to Kubernetes (From container to containers), this ought to be a nice change of pace!

 

That's all for this week's edition of the Editorial, please join us next time as we continue our journey through the JBoss Communities in search of interesting articles and news. 



This new year has barely begun but the JBoss community is already running full steam ahead! But don’t worry, this editorial will catch you up in no time.

Fire

Wildfly has a new project lead!

 

Let's start by some rather important community news: WildFly Project Lead is now Brian Stansberry ! Willdfly is a crucial project for the JBoss community but we are very lucky to see Brian Stansberry taking the lead here. He has been working for years and the project and he is a perfect fit for the position.

 

 

January is the hear of Winter so it's only but fitting that the Hibernate community is quite active! First of all, the last weeks have seen quite a few interesting releases:

But there was quite a lot more happening at the same time! If you want to catch up, just browse the last two community newsletters they've released:

 

Evangelist's Corner

 

Our very own Eric D.Schabell appears to have decided to skip the winter holidays altogether and just keep blogging and posting like a machine! Look at all the material he released in the past weeks:

 

Techbytes

 

By now, you should be all catch up with the news so let's now dive into some more technical topic. First, let's take a look at Securing an embedded Jetty server using Elytron. Or maybe Using the Yeoman Camel-Project generator to jump start a project will be more up your alley? Eager for more? Well, look into Building Java 11 and Gradle containers for OpenShift ! At least, but not the least, Eclipse Che 7 is coming and this series of articles will make you want to try it for sure:

 

Total eclipse

 

As you can see, the winter holidays has not slowed down the releases within the JBoss community:

Decaf'

This editorial should contain enough "Java" to keep you up all night! So let's me conclude with something a bit less caffeinated, but that should still be quite interesting to most members of the JBoss community: Security Considerations for Container Runtimes.

 

 

That's all for this week's edition of the Editorial, please join us next time as we continue our journey through the JBoss Communities in search of interesting articles and news. 

The last editorial was focused on the "breaking news" of the day. Even if the dust has far from settled on this, it's time for us to get back to business as usual! Well, not really as usual, because we have a rather awesome announcement about .... SpringBoot!

 

SpringBoot

While technically more of a Red Hat news than a JBoss community one, it seems to very much deserved to be mentioned here: Announcing: Full Spring Boot support for Red Hat OpenShift Application Runtimes !!! I won't comment more but I will urge to take a look at the post!

 

Infinispan - on road to version 10!

 

The Infinispan project is getting close to release its next  major version and they have laid for us the road ahead: The road to Infinispan 10 (Alpha1)! This post is nice sum up of the coming new features and changes in the project. I highly recommend you take a look at it. And if you have not yet played with or experimented with Infinispan, maybe this Quick start Infinispan on Kubernetes would be a nice opportunity to do so. And if you have familiar with Infinispan, you certainly want to explore its usage on Kubernetes!

Tech Bytes

 

The headlines above are already plenty to digest. However, you might still be hungry for a tidbits of technical knowledge. We therefore selected a few things for you to nimble on:

 

Not done yet? Worry not, our own Eric D. Schabell has also plenty for you to fest on!

 

 

Releases, releases, releases...

While we are blogging, twitting and emailing, the developers of the JBoss Community are quietly working and more importantly.... Releasing!

 

That's all for this week's edition of the Editorial, please join us next time as we continue our journey through the JBoss Communities in search of interesting articles and news.

If you are, like me, in Europe now, you must know that it is (ridiculously) hot right now... But despite this heat wave of a sort, the JBoss community, as always, have been pretty busy in the last two weeks - certainly leveraging the relative quiteness of the summer season, to get some "things done". Let's take a look at you may have missed in the recent days...

 

Fan

Techbytes

 

Let's start with some high level consideration by checking out this new article called  From Agile to Serverless. Indeed, as the buzz around "serverless" is growing up, I though it might be a good idea to remember a bit how we ended up here !

 

Zig Zag

Deploying application inside Openshift is certainly a big trend of the last year. Indeed, one of the core functionality of Openshift - autoscaling, can be the key to success, but is also not so easy to implement. So you certainly want to take look at this quite good article on Autoscaling the Red Hat Cache Service on OpenShift. (and if you wonder, Red Hat Cache Service is based on Infinispan ).

 

If there is something that many of us like, as being both developer and member of JBoss Community, is to find way for products to integrate in way that match our way of working - rather than being forced to use a tool in a certain way. So, for instance, if you do not like XML, but love to work with Camel, you need to check up this little article on Polyglot Camel Routes. Along the same lines, if you have to work with JS but would like to be able to use Java instead, take a look at the following article: Adventures in GraalVM: invoke Java code from JS in native-image

. Last, but not the least, let's take a quick look at how How to set up RBAC on Red Hat AMQ Broker!

 

Community

 

The JBoss community encompasses several other ones and one of the most thriving is certainly the Hibernate community. And the best way to keep up with this one is to check out their Hibernate Community Newsletter 15/2018. One of the main feature of this month entry is the interview of one of the developer: Meet Jan-Willem Gmelig Meyling.

As always, our own Eric D. Schabell has been quite productive in the last two weeks and released not one, but two articles on Opensource.com: What data is too risky for the cloud? and Why you can't move everything to the cloud. On top of those articles, he also released the fourth part of his ongoing series for DZone on 3 Pitfalls Everyone Should Avoid With Hybrid Multi-Cloud (Part 4).

 

Releases, releases, releases...

As alwasy, the last past two weeks have seen their fair share of releases - so here is a small recap:

 

Decaf'

 

The JBoss community and products are not living in their own little planet and there is all action happening around them that you may like to be aware of. Openshift being a rising interest in the Java world, it's certainly make sense to know about the Renaming of OpenShift Origin with 3.10 release. Also of interest for the Java developer would be those the two next articles. The first one cover the not so easy topic of Container-native integration testing

and the second adresses the problematic of Natively compile Java code for better startup time. Both are certainly worth checking out!

 

Hopefully, you have found something in this week's editorial to pique your interest and give you something to explore while waiting for next week's installment. Join us here next week for more news from the JBoss Community.

Welcome to a new edition of the JBoss Weekly Editorial. As summer comes closer on the northern hemisphere, the blue sky and sunny days do not appear to be able to hinder the community progress. No rest for the weary, ain't it? As proof, Red Hat just released Red Hat Fuse 7 - obviously built from the tremendous amount of work the Fuse community has put in the project in the last month (and releases).

 

Techbytes

 

We'll start this editorial by jumping directly into the a set of technical articles that have been released in the previous week. The first we would like to mention is The best way to write a Hibernate ORM issue test case . It will be of interest to anyone who would like to contribute a feature or a bug fix to the project, but also reveal an often under documented aspect a project: the testing framework.

 

Right after this one, let's go into something a bit more practical and take a deep look at how to Configure permissions using Elytron in WildFly 13. And, as long as we talk about our beloved app server, let's take a peak at What’s New in WildFly Management Console. Still related to Wildfly, we need to mention this interesting Introduction to Red Hat Application Migration Toolkit.

 

Events & Evangelist's Corner

 

As always, our own Eric D. Schabell has been active last week and has just released the slides of his talk at Shift Developer Conference 2018 on How to Jump Start a Career in Open Source. He was also in Scotland, just yesterday, to give a talk on Application Modernization and Migration Tech Talk at Scotland JBug Meetup Hopefully some of you living in the area will have had a chance to catch him!

 

Infinispan thanks Great Indian Developer Summit & Voxxed Days Zurich. His "world tour" of a sort is, of course, not finish, as he also attends our very own Red Hat Summit.

 

Releases, releases, releases

 

There is only one release we will mention in this section, for once, but it's a big one:  Red Hat Fuse 7 - Announcing Red Hat Fuse 7 GA!!

 

Decaf

 

Docker, and container in a more general sense, adoption have certainly increased a lot over the few last year. This adoption is also quite important in the Java and JBoss ecosystem, thus maybe this blog entry might be interesting to you too: How to install Red Hat CDK 3.4 on Fedora 28.

 

Hopefully, you have found something in this week's editorial to pique your interest and give you something to explore while waiting for next week's installment. Join us here next week for more news from the JBoss Community.

With the Winter finaly deciding to move on (a bit - or at least where I am) and the Easter holiday season, we have missed a couple of editorial! And for that, we truly apologize. However, the JBoss Community did not take a rest and quite a lot of happens in the last weeks. We'll endeavor to cover of lot that in this special "catch up" issue of the editorial!

 

ostern

 

Techbytes


Architectural Considerations

If there is two things trending in the last years, it is for sure Microservice and Security (and yes, Docker, but don't get me started on this). And this why this recent article discussing How a Service Mesh Can Help With Microservices Security is particularly interesting and compelling. On the other side of this spectrum, this other article discuss of the merits of Spreading Freedom with Mainframe.

 

"Learn Things"

If there is a trait that any member of the JBoss Community shares (or at least should) is curiosity. We are always one for learning new things. And the last weeks have seen a series of articles being released that are perfectly designed to quench our thirst. First, this Getting Started with Red Hat Decision Manager 7 will give you the opportunity to explore the world of OptaPlanner by running a simple demo on OpenShift.

 

Then, you can move on learning about Single Sign-On Made Easy with Keycloak / Red Hat SSO. Pretty neat, isn't it? Last but not the least, I've found this article on Spec API Modularity Patterns surprisingly interesting, go check it out!

 

Springbooting your Camel Ride ...

 

desert shade

If you have been meaning to explore Springboot and/or Camel, the last weeks have provided with some excellent material to do so. First of all, Claus Ibsen released his talk at DevNation on Apache Camel: Camel Riders in the Cloud (30 minute video). From there, you can naturally move to Writing Your First Camel Spring Boot Project With the Rest DSL. As no serious application should not be developed without proper testing, you will be able to move quite naturally to the following article on Unit Testing for Camel Rest DSL and Spring Boot.

 

Once there, you may even want to spice things up by Setting Up a Failover Scenario Using Apache Camel ZooKeeper. And the, if you feel your Camel/Springboot app is be ready to be released, you can even give it a try on Openshift following this article on Deploying a Spring Boot App with MySQL on OpenShift.

 

... or Vert.xing things out

 

Vortex

If Springboot and Camel are not your things - or simply if you are thirsthy for more, you also have the opportunity to dive into Vert.x. Indeed, following his introduction article from a few weeks ago, Clément Escoffier released a new one, focusing on Vert.x Application Configuration. From there you can easily extend your exploration to learning Some Rest with Vert.x and even investigate how to set up Clustering Vert.x with Infinispan.

 

Winter may be on the way out, but it is still time to Hibernate!

 

The Hibernate community is a large subset of our own community. Tracking its own activities can be a challenged and this is why, as always, we strongly recommend you take a peek at the Hibernate Community Newsletter 06/2018 which is a perfect way to do so!

 

Evangelist's Corner

As always, our own Eric D.Schabell have kept himself quite busy in the last weeks and released some quite interesting content. First of all, he kept going on with his guide for the upcoming Red Hat Summit and covered this time the Red Hat Summit 2018 Labs: Hands-on with Security. He also released the second part of his article on Inside Open Innovation Labs Residency (Part 2). Last but not the least, he released the first part of a new article on 3 Pitfalls Everyone Should Avoid with Hybrid Multicloud (Part 1). Please, go check all those out and enjoy !

 

People Section

A community, especially one as old as JBoss, is most of all made of the people contributing to it. This is why we would like to acknowledge some people in this editorial's edition. First of all, let's congratulate Claus Ibsen (@davsclaus) on his 10 Years as Apache Camel committer ! It is no small achievement. We also would like to extend our welcome to the community to Mark Rotteveel!

 

Releases, releases, releases...

 

With almost three weeks of backlog, it will come to no surprise to anyone reading this editorial that we have quite a large bunch of releases to mention here:

 

Hopefully, you have found something in this week's editorial to pique your interest and give you something to explore while waiting for next week's installment. Join us here next week for more news from the JBoss Community.

Welcome to a new edition of the JBoss Weekly Editorial! It's freezing and snowing in the Northern Hemisphere, but this has not hinder the progress of the JBoss community and its numerous project. Also, the Red Hat Summit (8-10 May) is on the horizon, so it's time to prepare for it!

 

Microprofiling and OpenAPI with Swarm

 

With the latest release of Wildfly Swarm, one has an excellent opportunity to test out the OpenAPI microprofile that has been introduced a few years back. So if you ever wanted to dabble into setting up your own API service, go on and check this out!

 

Evangelist's Corner - The Red Hat Summit

 

As mentioned above, the Red Hat Summit is around the corner! It's less than a couple of month away! If you have the chance to attend it, you should definitely checked out this Ultimate Guide to Red Hat Summit 2018 Labs on Hands-on with Linux Containers done by Eric. D Schabell. This will help start preparing for the event, especially if you want to focus on Docker container.

 

Hibernate Community

 

As often mentioned here, the Hibernate community is a huge part of the JBoss Community but also its own thriving ecosystem on its own. That's why there is nothing better than this monthly Hibernate Community Newsletter (05/2018) to keep up with them...

 

Everything Eclipse Vert.x

 

Vert.x ist a trending technology for a little while, but maybe you did not have time (yet) to jump on the wagon. Well, you're in for a treat, as Clément Escoffier just released a very nice Introduction to Eclipse Vert.x - My First Vert.x Application ! Go check it !

 

And if you are already on board the Vert.x train, there is an excellent upcoming opportunity for you. Indeed, even if Winter is still crippling the Northern Hemisphere, Spring are Summer are getting closer and closer, which also means that the Google Summer of Code 2018 is also coming. And the Eclipse Vert.x is looking for submission!

 

Releases, releases, releases...

 

And as always, last week so a fair amount of releases from some rather important project of the JBoss community:

 

Decaf'

Before concluding the editorial, let's leave a bit the Java ecosystem and take a look at what happened around it last week. In this regard, I think that the following announcement of pretty cool: Node.js General Availability in Red Hat OpenShift Application Runtimes. If you are interested in Node.js application I think you will find that having runtimes on OpenShift for you is going to be an excellent way to put your apps in the cloud.

 

Hopefully, you have found something in this week's editorial to pique your interest and give you something to explore while waiting for next week's installment. Join us here next week for more news from the JBoss Community.

Welcome to our first installment of the JBoss Weekly Editorial 2018 ! We are looking for 2018, an other year that will certainly be quite interesting for the JBoss community, as the integration of its middleware products in Openshift is accelerating... If you have not boarded yet the Openshift wagon - here is the perfect opportunity!

 

JBoss on Openshift!

 

Openshift is an excellent platform to deploy application and makes them scale. However, as always, it's not that easy to figure out what is the best way to do so. If you are having this kind of question regarding your own application, take a look at Develop and Deploy on OpenShift Online Starter using Red Hat JBoss Developer Studio.

 

And if you want a more advanced example, take a look at this very interesting article on JBoss Data Virtualization on OpenShift: Integrating a Remote SQL Server Database.

 

Techbytes

As often, the holiday season of the last weeks have been a perfect opportunity for many members of the community to publish quite in-depth article on topic of their predilection. The first of this list is certainly the one from Bela Ban, core developer of JGroups, on a recent interesting contribution to the framework that allow to inject a split brain into a JGroups cluster.  In a similar fashion, the Keycloak community took the time to document how to  use Keycloak, Apache and OpenID Connect together. And as along as we are talking authentification and autorisation, let's mention this pretty interesting article on Enabling SAML-based SSO with Remote EJB through Picketlink.

 

The next article might come handy if you want to play with Wildfly's transaction manager Narayana. Indeed, the article documents how to use

Narayana jdbc transactional driver in a standalone application. Along the same line, as an other article covers How to add a new constraint to Hibernate Validator in a few simple steps. Between a transactionnal JDBC driver and custom constraint in Hibernate Validator, your data should be free of many issues now .

 

Last, but certainly not the least, here is a very, very useful article describing how to enable Byteman Script with Red Hat JBoss Fuse and AMQ. Byteman scripts is an excellent way to investigate, and even resolve, issue on your application. It is definitely worth exploring the tool if you don't know it and this article is an excellent opportunity to do so!

 

Evangelist's Corner

With the end of 2017, Eric D.Schabell took the time to a 2017 in review - Global Technology Evangelist Director and more, but also released an interesting article on AppDev in the Cloud - Financial Services with Process Driven Application. If those articles are not enough, do also checkout this

Red Hat Fuse - Tech Quickies series - Zero. Hello world from Christina!

 

Releases, releases, releases...

 

 

Hopefully, you have found something in this week's editorial to pique your interest and give you something to explore while waiting for next week's installment. Join us here next week for more news from the JBoss Community.

Yet again an other week has passed in the JBoss Community, and as always, a lot content was released that will most likely interest you. Especially this week a lot of JBoss/Java related content were published on the Red Hat Developers Blog, so if you don't check this blog, you will be happy to see them mentioned here below...

 

Higher Level Point of View

While we love our gritty, low-level, technical tidbits (and we have a techbytes section for that below), it is always nice to take a step back, and look at the big picture, now and then. In this context, I think you will find the article on Hexagonal Architecture as a Natural fit for Apache Camel, quite interesting. I also like the The State of Microservices Survey 2017 that was released last week too.

 

Evangelist's Corner

 

As always, JBoss's evangelist are keeping our community update, releasing, every week, a lot of passionating content. Last week, Eric D.Schabell has thus provided us a nice How to install new OpenShift Container Platform 3.7 in minutes , along with an article on Zero to Cloud Ops on Container Development Kit (CDK) in Minutes. So, if you literally have only 5 minutes this week, those are articles are for you

 

Techbytes

So after high level considerations and some tutorial, let's go deep into technical details with this short but pretty neat article on Calling JDK Tools Programmatically on Java 9. Then, if you want more, let's take a look at Securing AMQ7 Routers with SSL. That should do it, don't it ? No ? Want more ?

 

No problem, let's look at Keycloak Identity Brokering with OpenShift ! And, by the way, if you like OpenShift, you should be very interested by last announcement about Red Hat OpenShift Application Runtimes (RHOAR)!

 

Events and community

If you want a good excuse to good to Paris (or France), you will be happy to hear that Devoxx France 2018 just open its Call for Paper! So please, go submit your talks proposal before mid January!

 

If you are doing anything with Hibernate related project, also don't forget to check their Hibernate Community Newsletter 23/2017 that was just released.

Releases, releases, releases...

 

... and as always, our thriving community has seen its fair share of software releases in the last week - including maintenance release of two very important project (Teiid and Keycloak):

 

Hopefully, you have found something in this week's editorial to pique your interest and give you something to explore while waiting for next week's installment. Join us here next week for more news from the JBoss Community.

As always, last week have seen its fair share of action in the JBoss Community, with multiples releases and many interesting (and technical) content being released, but especially the Debezium project has been going the extra mile to allow to discover their product, crafting a nice tutorial and even providing OpenShift and Docker files to help play with it... So go check it out !

 

Change data capture with Debezium (and even on OpenShift!)

 

The Debezium team just released version 0.6.1 of their change data capturing (CDC) tool for MySQL, Postgres and MongoDB (support for further databases is coming soon).  For those eager to try out CDC themselves, there's a tutorial running you through the set-up of Debezium and its required services like Apache Kafka. There are now Docker Compose files for all the supported databases, which make it a breeze to start the infrastructure used in the tutorial and see Debezium in action.

 

You would like to set up Debezium on OpenShift? Then we got good news for you, too; There are detailed instructions on how to do that available on the Debezium website now. And using Minishift, you can easily try this out on an OpenShift cluster running on your local machine. Development of Debezium is in full swing, enabling many use cases such as data replication, data synchronization between different microservices or updating full-text search indexes. If you got any input or questions on Debezium, the development team is looking forward to hearing from you in the Debezium discussion group.

 

Building and consuming Virtual Microdatabase

 

Teiid - on which the Red Hat product JBoss Data Virtualization is based on, is rather powerful and interesting tool, that is (to my experience) yet to be well spread and understand. So I'm very happy about this new walk through released last week, presenting, in detail, how one set up and consume, in just a few click, a virtual database.

 

On top of this tutorial, a rather intriguing article on Low-risk Monolith to Microservice Evolution has been released last week, and will certainly allow to go even deeper and farther with Teiid.

 

Fun with SSL (and Kafka)

 

In the last few years, with security becoming more and more of concerns (as it should!), setting up Java solution to directly use SSL have been  an increasing practise (oppose to the days when this was delegated to the load-balancer in front of them). In this context, it is nice to have a tutorial, such as this one released last week on Kafka with OpenSSL. But it is even more appreciable to have also an article on how to test SSL set up (and how): SSL Testing Tool. So no more excuse to run insecure services !

 

Techbytes

 

If your technical thirst for technical exploration or learning is still not quenched by all of those articles, there still a couple more thing you can explore. First, if you are hookup on Drools and the related jBPM ecosystem, you checkout the Improved KIE Server documentation along with this article on Sub cases for case instance and ... process instance (jBPM). And maybe simply explore the Bean Validation benchmark revisited ?

 

Evangelist's Corner

 

Eric D. Schabell's 10 Steps to Cloud Happiness series is still ongoing and last week saw the release of Step 5 - Real Process Improvement - certainly a teasing title, isn't it ! Go check it out ! (or catch up on the series by starting with Step 1 - Get a Cloud.

 

Also, if you are happen to be an Infinispan fan (or just interested by it), see if you can join the upcoming event featuring talks about it: Infinispan coming to Duchess France and Devoxx Belgium !

 

Releases, releases, releases...

 

 

Decaf'

 

Enough of Java coding, GC and other JVM madness ? TIme for a break ? Have something else for a little while ? Well let's see what happened last week on the non-Java universe...

 

If you want learn about infrastructure, especially all the complexity (and power) of a provisioning a environement on a large scale, I can but only recommend this two part article :

 

 

More anecdotal, but definitely noteworthy is Jim Whitehurst (Red Hat CEO) interview on ... Slashdot !

 

Hopefully, you have found something in this week's editorial to pique your interest and give you something to explore while waiting for next week's installment. Join us here next week for more news from the JBoss Community.

Running software in the clouds have been an essential topic of our industry for almost a decade now. While it used to be reserved to the cutting-edge, experimental and adventurous projects, it has been, in the last years, adopted largely by the industry. In this context, it is quite exciting to see all the news of last weeks surrounding the topic within the JBoss Community...

clouds

10 Steps to Cloud Happiness

 

If you have lived under a rock for the past decade, you may have no idea about cloud infrastructure - or maybe you never ended up using one. This editorial focuses a lot on cloud, so maybe you can take a look, at first, at the 10 steps tutorial started by Eric D.Schabell last week ?

 

 

Best way into the Clouds - OpenShift

Well, this might only be my opinion - so feel free to disagree - but I do think OpenShift is one of the best ways to get into a cloud infrastructure. And there was quite a lot of nifty informations about it released last week. First of all this pretty interesting article on JBoss A-MQ on OpenShift Cheat Sheet, will certainly help you manage your favorite MoM on a OpenShift container.

To go further down the road, you may even want to explore how to properly maintain your own images in OpenShift, than this first installment of a series of articles on Container Images for OpenShift (Part 1: Objectives) will certainly reveals itself to be an excellent starting point.

 

Last, but certainly not the least, an announcement from Red Hat and Alibaba, just yesterday, shows how much traction Cloud is having in our industry : Red Hat and Alibaba Cloud Join Forces to Bring Increased Flexibility with Open Source.

Eclipse - Java Tooling for the Sky

 

As much as cloud infrastructure is bringing easiness of deployment and scalable performance to your (Java) application, one still needs to write and design a resilient and robust application, not to mention the increasing need for the app to be as secure as possible against the many hacking threats out there.

Fortunately, the Eclipse project keeps enhancing the IDE, enabling us, developers, to write better apps. If you doubt, just take an eye at this article on Java code coverage in Eclipse! I'm pretty sure you never thought of using code coverage this way.... It is also nice to see the integration of Fuse technologies within Eclipse is making progress as shown by the following article: Fuse development environment with Development Suite installer.

If you are excited by the new evolution or the future of the IDE, you should definitely join other members of the JBoss community, along with some Red Hat Developers at EclipseCon Europe on the 24th and 25th of October in Ludwigsburg, near Stuttgart, in Germany.

 

Hibernation season has started

 

Despite the actual meaning of its name, the Hibernate community has also been very active and keeping up with what is happening within the projects. It would require a separate article to cover it all! Fortunately, last week saw the release of the Hibernate Community Newsletter 19/2017 , so you just this need to check this out to get updated, and to make your user experience even smoother, the Hibernate websites get a facelift!

 

Techbytes

 

Of course, not everything things is about cloud. As always, the JBoss community having been working on numerous projects and keep offering improvements of all sort to their users. For instance, Apache Camel fans will be very happy to read (more) about Apache Camel route coverage tooling on the way. Or maybe you would like to learn how to set up Hawkular Alerts in ManageIQ? Or rather how to Run an Embedded WildFly Host Controller in the CLI?

 

See, plenty of advanced materials there, but maybe you crave learning new things, rather than delve into complex topics. So, what about Getting started with workbench and KIE server on 7.3 (and onwards)?

 

Also, any Java developer will be interested in knowing what is coming with the JDK 9 release, so let's take a look at this Overview of the New JDK 9 Release.

 

Hopefully, you have found something in this week's editorial to pique your interest and give you something to explore while waiting for next week's installment. Join us here next week for more news from the JBoss Community.

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