Skip navigation
1 2 3 Previous Next

Weekly Editorial

33 Posts authored by: Mark Little

For those who don't recognise it, the title is a reference to that Nobel Prize winner Bob Dylan and his song, but it really is quite apt at the moment. First let's look at some monumental news which is hopefully not so new now: Java EE is moving to a new home, an as-yet undisclosed open source foundation and to presumably a governance model which puts much more power into the hands of the community! This is pretty significant for the wider enterprise Java community, whether you use a full-blown application server or just some of the components that have been defined over the years within the JCP process; now you will have more ability to help influence the direction of the specifications, code etc. just as you might if you were to participate in any open source project. I'm also hoping that the work we are doing with Eclipse MicroProfile will help influence the next releases of Java EE, or whatever it might be called, since that has always been our intent.

 

OK so on to the next bit of news: www.jboss.org is moving too! Although not quite on the same scale as moving Java EE and not really a move per se, it's important that anyone involved in our upstream communities and products take note because you can really help influence the future of the site. As I mention in my blog on the topic, the changes we have in mind aren't going to happen overnight so there is time to comment or use your clicks to let us know how you use the current site.

 

A few other changes this week include the fact you can now get NoSQL support in jBPM, and as Maciej also describes, through this there's now an option to use ElasticSearch as a data store. Since we're talking about things Maciej has been writing about this week, he's been busy also by writing about how jBPM 7 can be used in cloud environments.

 

Just time for a few more announcements. There's an article on how to use MQTT with Vert.x, WildFly 11 CR1 has been released, and of course there have been a number of other projects doing releases so go check out the blog feed. OK that's it for this week (surely that's enough?!) See you next time.

This week we've a mixed bunch of entries to highlight. Let's start with a mainstay of this editorial, jBPM and Drools. Edson has been writing about how they and OptaPlanner are switching to agile delivery! Hot on the heels of that Kris gives an overview of the 7.0 release of jBPM! Wow, I remember when we were still at version 3! Maciej has more to say on the topic of jBPM 7 too when he dives into some changes which affect case management.

 

This week we've also seen some prolific activity from the various data teams. For example, William on Distributed Streams in Infinispan, Radim on the new scattered cache implementation, again in Infinispan, and Galder recapping on Reactive Big Data. And speaking of reactive systems we've got a posting for a GSoC student working on Vert.x and OpenAPI! Really good to see student activity in our projects.

 

Of course we've had a number of project releases, including Claus on Camel in Action 2nd Edition, Teiid 10.0.0 Alpha 1, and Keycloak 3.2.0 Final. Check out the buzz for more!

 

That's it for this week! See you next time!!

We're back after a couple of weeks break and where to start? The obvious candidate is BPM because the team seem to be dominating the feeds recently! The BPM product architect and jBPM project lead, Kris Verlaenen, has been prolific with a series of articles about the bpmNEXT conference he is presenting at. Take a look because there are some interesting perspectives on where BPM in general is going in the future. Kris has an introductory article here too. And related to BPM, Maciej has written about a fairly common requirement, how to send emails from within a process with a nice worked example. In an earlier article, Maciej also took the time to show the new Case Management Showcase application in the BPM workbench.

 

Not to be outdone, the Hawkular team have a few important announcements. They had a talk at CloudNativeCon in Berlin.

 

2017-04-07-teaser.png

But then there was the announcement that we are getting involved with the Jaeger project!

 

"This new version of Jaeger provides very similar functionality to Zipkin, which is focused on visualising individual traces. It does not have the aggregated views currently supported in Hawkular APM - however from discussions with the Jaeger project, they are keen to be able to provide aggregated views. Therefore we have made the decision that, rather than refactor the Hawkular APM project’s model to be more OpenTracing compatible, it makes more sense to collaborate on the Jaeger project."

 

Keep watching this space for further updates!

 

A few more noteworthy announcements and articles in the last couple of weeks include:

 

 

There were the usual flurry of project releases, such as WildFly Swarm, Arquillian, Infinispan and ByteMan. Well done to those teams!

 

OK, that's it for this week. See you next time!

OK so this is an editorial meant to cover many things happening in the JBoss/middleware space for Red Hat. And whilst we'll get to a summary of some of the other things going on in  this space, I wanted to start with a reference to a recent announcement by our xPaaS Product Manager. In this article we're announcing that efforts like Vert.x, WildFly Swarm and even Spring Boot will now also be available on OpenShift. Now I kinda see this as good and there was no intention to give the impression anything else we're doing and have built up a huge user/developer base around, such as EAP or Fuse, is somehow being neglected or reduced in priority. Far from it: the EAP 7 series is a key part of xPaaS and we've worked closely with the OpenShift team to ensure it runs well there. Same goes for other Java stacks, such as Fuse or BRMS/BPMS. But some folks have perhaps read too much between the lines here and think otherwise, so I wanted to take the opportunity to make it clear that enterprise Java, in many varieties of implementation, remains our focus and priority. Whether you're interested in the established approaches such as Java EE or some of the newer efforts, like Vert.x or WildFly Swarm, Red Hat is the home for your (hybrid) cloud deployments.

 

With that said, onwards! Following on from the above, which is also at the heart of our microservices efforts, Bilgin has something to say on the topic as he attempts to apply psychology motivational theories to microservices - and not before time And of course no good microservices effort can ignore OpenShift, so Eric's demo of the new OpenShift 3.4 release is good timing! Now whilst Hawkular Metrics isn't microservice specific, I do expect to see it have a significant positive impact there so you should take a look at Michael's post about Pandas

 

Speaking of the importance of Java EE, as we were earlier, the Community Asylum this time around talks to Gunnar about Bean Validation 2.0. Separately, Ramesh talks about how the 9.2 release of Teiid now supports the SQL-MED specification.

 

Let's finish with some project releases, including JGroups 4.0.0, Keycloak 2.5.4, and Hibernate Search 5.7.0. Another worthy mention is the latest Node.js client release for Infinispan's Hot Rod protocol which supports cross-site client failover!

 

Well that's enough for this week. See you next time!

OK so many of our American friends and colleagues will probably be slowly digesting their turkey dinners so this is a great time to give you and them something to read. Let's start with a bang!

 

Screen Shot 2016-11-25 at 13.23.18.png

 

Yes, the Ceylon team have released 1.3.1 which, as this blog recounts, is much more than a micro release! You should definitely got and check out the article and the release itself.

 

Next up, and Ceylon has a play here as it's also available on OpenShift, is the recent xPaaS announcement around Data Virtualization. This marks an important milestone for our products on OpenShift, where we have containerized runtimes of all our Middleware solutions available for our customers, while we continue to evolve the experience around using the products. That means that today our customers and prospects can run:

 

  • JBoss EAP 6 and 7,
  • JBoss Web Server (Tomcat),
  • JBoss Data Grid,
  • Red Hat Single-sign-on,
  • JBoss BRMS decision server
  • JBoss BPMS intelligent process server
  • JBoss Fuse Integration Services
  • JBoss A-MQ and
  • JBoss Data Virtualization.

 

And we're not only just 'making these products available on OpenShift'. As important as enabling the products for such a scenario, we manage the lifecycle of all the dependencies for those products, and that greatly reduces the operational burden that traditional middleware imposes. Congrats to all of the teams involved!

 

On to the rest of the week and we've seen lots of projects release. These include Keycloak, Hibernate Validator, Hibernate ORM, WindUp and Forge. Finally, one important article to shine a light on is Claus' trip report from his adventures at ApacheCon (and this time his luggage appears to have gotten there and back without incident!) Some nice photos as well!

 

OK, that'll do for now. Plenty to read about while that turkey digests! See you next time!

Many things happened this week but I'll take a selfish moment and start with a couple of articles I wrote. As I mentioned earlier in the week, it's been (over) 10 years since JBoss was acquired by Red Hat and it's been a great decade for open source enterprise middleware from Red Hat! Every one of our customers, partners and community members deserves a round of applause!!

images.jpeg

Next up I had to write some clarification text around the MicroProfile work we announced back at DevNation. Take a look if you are still confused but let me summarise here for some people who appear to be unclear about how open source works: it's an upstream, open source effort to gain experience from communities, vendors and individuals, around developing microservices with enterprise Java; it's not a standard, though it going to use various standards, and eventually once we believe we have something worth standardising we'll make the right next move.

Screen Shot 2016-07-09 at 14.22.29.png

Talking about things we announced at DevNation or Summit, Eric has written a summary article for those people who couldn't make it this year. Nice to see he included the killer keynote demo In a separate article Christina writes about a JBoss Fuse Integration workshop she, Eric and Siamak did at Summit - well worth checking out!

6.jpg

On to some non-Summit related activities this week. Let's start with Ceylon, where Stef talks about some modularity changes in the language as well as their Android support.

 

We've had a few releases this week too, including the first Hibernate OGM 5 maintenance release, Teiid 9.0.1, Hawkular Services 0.0.5 Final and Hawkular Metrics 0.17.0 (well done guys, for multiple releases!). The Hawkular team also wrote about scaling stateful services. Finally for this week, Gunnar has written about how you can upgrade Hibernate ORM in WildFly, something which is a lot simpler since their latest release of Hibernate last week 5.2.1.

 

OK, that's it for this week. And in light of our 10 year anniversary, I'll end with: Remember we love you, and Onward!

Apologies for being a couple of weeks since the last instalment but we're here again! And what a couple of weeks it's been?!

 

Microservices has been dominating a lot of conversations across the industry for a while. Is it new? How does it relate to SOA? When I was on holiday recently I got a chance to put down a few thoughts on the subject, for instance how they relate to fundamental distributed systems, or what constitutes a microservice if in the future, as I suspect, we allow them to become dynamic systems? I also had a few musings on what typically leads to monoliths and how microservices isn't necessarily going to avoid those pitfalls. Take a look because your input in this technology wave is crucial.

 

The Infinispan team seem to have got stuck in releasing one version after another (which is a good thing!) First we had 8.2.1.Final, then 8.1.3.Final, and now 9.0.0.Alpha1! Never one to be outdone, the Arquillian team shot back with a Graphene release, a new Drone version (two actually), and the Container Undertow release! There have also been a number of other releases of projects so check out The Buzz!

 

Time for a couple of other highlights, such as Marc talking about APIMan in a network with limited connectivity, Heiko about Hawkular in ManageIQ sprints, Martin on Weld meeting Vert.x (great news!) and Vlad with the Hibernate newsletter.

 

Mauricio also had some good news about the Drools book he co-authored - it's out now! Good luck guys and I'm looking forward to the movie version!

 

OK that's it for now. Hopefully we'll be back in a week and not two

OK let's get the sad news out of the way: one of editorial team and a key member of the JBoss family is leaving! Good luck Markus and come back soon!

 

Now that's out of the way we return you to our normal scheduled service. And as usual Eric has been doing a great job of pushing the OpenShift+JBoss agenda. Whether it's the Container Development Kit (CDK), with it's integration through Eclipse, or just installing OpenShift as a private PaaS, Eric always manages to get straight to the point and in an easily understandable manner.

 

One of our relatively newer projects, APIMan, has had a few articles in the last week. Len has written about improvements on plugin management, which is really a key area for APIMan and Policies. Eric, the project lead, has also stepped up to write about how you can republish your APIs, and how you can re-register your client apps. If you're at all interested in API Management, which cuts across a number of different areas, then check out these articles as well as the project.

 

In other news, we've had a really interesting article on testing and Ceylon, Heiko has written about the work they're doing with integrating JBoss Management and ManageIQ (a very important step!), and Keycloak 1.9.0.Final was released! Congrats to the team.

 

OK, that's it for this week. See you next week!

Yes it's that time of year again when a lot of the world starts to think about Father Christmas, festive cheer and snowmen! JBoss and Red Hat are no different, but despite this it's also been a busy time for us here. Maybe the snowmen have been helping us out?!

 

free-snowman-clipart-Snowman3.png

The Vert.x community have been asynchronously hard at work (see what I did there ?) with automatic redeployment in Eclipse. And talking about Eclipse, as Alexey mentions we're hiring again for the team so if you've any interest then get in touch! Ho ho ho, let's not forget about the JBoss Tools maintenance release either!

 

Two of our most prolific authors have been making their lists, checking them twice and writing about a lot of interesting things: Eric, who has been writing about all things BRMS related for a very long time, presents his audience with a lovely Christmas present of the Ultimate Collection of BRMS Demos, and if that wasn't enough he has a quick tour of importing a project into BRMS. Meanwhile Markus has written about the latest EAP 7 Beta release, just in time for those people with time on their hands on Christmas day. And conveniently he also has the second part of his refresher on EE7 backend features.

 

ee-7-overview.PNG

If that isn't enough for you, Markus also managed to find time to write an article and associated video about getting started with EAP 7 quickstarts! Phew!

 

Now if EAP 7 beta isn't enough for you both Jason and Alessio have a few things to say about the latest candidate release of WildFly 10. So let's finish with Davide's article on Cassandra integration with Hibernate OGM 5.0.0 Beta1 and Christina's entry about different ways in which you can develop Fuse applications. I hope you've enjoyed these additional Christmas presents and we see you all after the day. Enjoy and remember: we love you!

 

Christmaspresent1.jpg

For those of you in the US reading this a day late ... Happy 4th of July

 

We've a lot to cover this week as despite the fact many people have been recovering from the hectic week at Summit/DevNation, life and work must go on! So for a start let's look at something not necessarily associated with JBoss: Minecraft. For those of you in the know, however, you'll understand that not only is Minecraft based on Java but it also relies on Netty! A while back we announced that we had joined the Devoxx4Kids community; well this weekend our very own Arun Gupta and his son will be running the Devoxx4Kids Minecraft Modding Workshop at Minecon in London (helped by yours truly!).

 

Screen Shot 2015-07-03 at 11.12.13.png

We all know that last week was Summit, but it turns out that a new conference was also kicked off in Barcelona. JBCNConf was attended by several of the Fabric8 team and Claus gives a great overview of what happened there. Which ties in quite nicely to the release of Fuse 6.2, which Christina writes about. As Christina states, one of the important new features is RBAC: "Another important new feature is the Role Base Access Control. Powered by JAAS implemented. Many enterprise needed this in real production environment, what this does, it authorized user's right on access the Fuse console, JMX, command line mode and the service allowed in OSGi." Claus also has a great article on getting up and running with Fuse 6.2 quickly.

 

Now of course we have the usual flurry of entries summarising Summit and DevNation. Including one from Eric with his usual BPM focus, Mark Proctor talks about his presentation (with more related here), Arun (again) has a nice piece on Summit with lots of photos, and of course there's the Summit Keynote demo to watch again!

 

Screen Shot 2015-07-03 at 11.20.50.png

Some releases to note include 0.1.0 of the Hawkular Business Transaction Management project, which Gary discusses along with how you can monitor SwitchYard applications with it. Hot on its heels is Heiko talking about the Alpha2 release of Hawkular. JBoss Data Grid 6.5 is out!

 

If you're a LiveOak fan then you should take a look at the latest entry from Ken talking about its future.

 

And last but by no means least, WildFly 9 Final is out!!

 

OK that's it for this week. And I'll be on holiday soon, so it'll be down to the other editors to take you through the summer

This week has seen a lot of activity around DevOps and microservices. I'll shamelessly start with plugging a few things I've written on the subject, such as how you should look at microservices and Linux containers (such as Docker) for the natural unit of failure within a microservices environment:

 

"If you are building multiple microservices, or using them from other groups and organisations, within your applications or composite service(s), then do some thinking about how they are related and if they should fail as a unit then pull them together into a single image."

 

I also wrote an addendum to that article the other day just to make it clear that whilst containers such as Docker are useful, their neither necessary nor sufficient for microservices, especially in the Java world:

 

"If you're thinking about developing microservices in Java then you don't have to worry about using Linux containers: your unit of failure is the JVM. Start there and built upward."

 

I also wrote about how state can be handled with microservices, especially in a DevOps/cloudy environment where Linux containers are used and typically assumed to me immutable. Hopefully people find these articles useful - I certainly found them fun to write. Then in a semi-related article, Eric wrote about Docker and integration/BPM projects - lots of nice demos there! Everyone is looking at Linux containers/Docker these days, including the Keycloak team where Marko wrote about clustering recently.

 

Now some of our projects and products that are at the forefront of the things we're doing around microservices and DevOps are Fuse, Camel and Fabric8. Christina wrote about how to (lazily) create an offline repository. Christian took time to write generally about Enterprises and Microservices (part 1), but also how to do continuous delivery with Fabric8 v1. Claus has written a great "getting started with Fuse" article, so check it out if you're new to Fuse. Marek has written an entry on securing Fuse and Hawtio applications with Keycloak, which is a critical requirement for enterprise deployments.

 

In other news Kenny mentions the upcoming Red Hat virtual event Building Data-driven Solutions for the Internet of Things on April 23 at 11 a.m. (EST) / 15:00 (GMT). Sign up now! And the Arquillian and TorqueBox teams release new versions - 1.0.0 Alpha 5 (Docker extensions) and 3.1.2 respectively.

 

OK that's it for this week! Onward!

Welcome to a slightly delayed editorial this week - we've been busy And welcome to Pi Day!

 

As the title indicates, there's been a lot of activity in the past 7 days around docker (containers) and microservices. I put (virtual) pen to (virtual) paper and had a few things to say about microservices and containerless development. Arun has been working through his tutorial series on Docker and this week covered Docker Machine and then building on that how to deploy to WildFly and Docker using Eclipse. As if that wasn't enough, he finishes up with a discussion about Docker recipes for Java EE application servers. Christian had a great piece on the cost of change with microservices and DevOps which is well worth a read, but I'll include his conclusion here:

 

"At the end of the day, DevOps, Microservices, being “Agile”, etc, are about creating a culture that focuses on reducing the cost of change. Be wary of the vendors trying to capitalize on this, be wary of your organizations embracing this half-assed, and try to keep perspective and the goals in mind regardless of your role."

 

Now although not strictly container or microservices related, there's been some work going on around JBoss technologies and OpenShift. For instance, using BPM as an example Eric Schabell talks about how to deploy any project into OpenShift with the click of a single button! Gustavo talks about running Infinispan on OpenShift 3, so if you haven't taken a look at some of the changes coming in OpenShift this is a good opportunity.

 

As usual there's a lot more going on that we can cover in the editorial, so check out The Buzz. But we'll wrap up with a few things, such as the release of jBPM 6.2.0 Final, so good it needed two people to announce it; Mark Proctor has been talking about some of the changes coming Drools, including the ability to zoom and pan between decision tables and activity monitoring in jBPM. We've also announced that the PicketLink and Keycloak projects are merging! But we'll give the last word to Claus who has announced that in the year 2015 Apache Camel 2.15.0 was released!

It's Christmas! As has become a tradition, on this day we don't create the weekly editorial but leave it to the interested reader to go and read the blog feeds, rather than have us summarise. You don't quite know what you're going to get, so think of it as a an extra Christmas present from us to you

 

IMAG0025.jpg

It's been a great year for Red Hat as a whole and especially JBoss. Sales continue to grow apace. Adoption of our products and projects across a much wider range of sectors increases year on year. We're no longer the 2nd choice of customers but their 1st choice. And we've gone from being challenger to the challenged, which is a good sign but also means we need to keep pushing forward. None of this would have been possible without team work from inside and outside Red Hat. Our community of customers and upstream project users (and contributors from both) are an essential part of what we are and how we work. You are what makes this worthwhile. Your feedback, patches, code donations and all types of involvement help energise our projects and products; we're a team and a family!

 

This year has also seen us expand the JBoss family with the acquisition of the FeedHenry team, who are already making the right connections and finding a lot of interest in what they bring. I know there are great things ahead as we integrate them with our existing products, such as EAP and xPaaS. So it has definitely been a great year for us in more ways than one. Christmas gives us all an opportunity to try to step back and take a well earned rest. However, I know many of you and our teams will be beavering away over Christmas regardless (I know I will be too, with some of my pet projects) but do try and enjoy this time of year and recharge your batteries in whatever way makes sense to you.

 

OK, it's time to get back to the turkey, Christmas pudding and wine. I wish you all a very Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year!

 

Onward!

This seems to be the week for releases! Bela announced JGroups 3.5.0Final is out; Claus that Apache Camel 2.14 is on the way; Forge 2.8.1Final is also out; so is Keycloak 1.0 RC 2; Brian mentions that RichFaces 4.5.0.Beta1 is out; and last, and by no means least, Mark gives us a heads up about some new features coming in Drools and jBPM - Activity Insight! And talking of jBPM, Eric was involved in a remote session with Peru recently to discuss Rules, Events and BPM with the local JUG! Eric's been very busy this week, as he has written a fantastic piece on integrating BPM with Apache Camel! The full code for the project is also available on github, so no excuse for not following along :-) Eric's also going to be presenting on xPaaS at this year's Devoxx!

 

The Open Source Mentor blog has a few interesting things to say on Hadoop and Red Hat, Fuse Service Works, IoT and ActiveMQ, and some more work from Eric on BPM and Fuse Service Works.

 

Markus has a great article on our Data Virtualization product, so check that out! And as if that wasn't enough, he also has something to say on our xPaaS efforts.

 

That's it until next week!

This week has seen a continued push around Containers (Docker) and JBoss, with Mr Docker Marek Goldmann writing about running Docker as systemd services. There are some really nice examples in the entry too.

 

systemd_deployment.png

We had a one-day JUDCon event a few weeks back and Andrew Rubinger has written up a piece about it as well as linking to a number of videos recorded at the event. It certainly sounds as if this event went well and maybe we'll plan some other one-day events like this in the future! If you attended and have written up your own experiences (good or bad) then let us know too so we can all learn from what worked and what didn't work. Congratulations to the Mobile team for the release of Beta 1 of the Unified Push Server! Not strictly just mobile related, but Max has also blogged about JBoss Tools 4.2 Beta 3, which contains support for Cordova and OpenShift, to name but two!

devstudio8_splash.png

In addition to JUDCon, there have been several other community-oriented events happening or announced, including the JavaForum in Stuttgart, the ATL-JBUG meeting coming up in August with a focus on Fuse Service Works and Docker (more containers).

 

The various project teams have been hard at work as usual. Vladimir writes about the performance of Map/Reduce in Infinispan 7.0.0; Bilgin discusses how people can write components for Camel; John has a lot to say about starting an ActiveMQ project in Eclipse and with Maven; and both Bela and Tristan have different things to talk about around large scale data grids, with Bela showing off the new record 500 node JDG cluster and Tristan cross-posting a link to Navin's video on cross data centre replication with JDG. And finally for this month's roundup, we've also had a bit of an IoT theme. Kenny Peeples writes about an article over on DZone which discusses IoT and mentions JBoss A-MQ; and yours truly discusses Enterprise IoT.

 

OK, that's it for this week!