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Weekly Editorial

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Welcome to this week's Editorial.  As Red Hat Summit 2016 gets closer we take a break from all the preparations to take you on another spin through some of the events that are going on within the  JBoss Communities.  Strap yourself in and hold on, here we go!


Bean Validation and Project Jigsaw


As most of you are already aware Project Jigsaw is an ongoing effort that has the aim of introducing  a module system into Java 9.  If you are involved in developing libraries or frameworks then you should be ensuring that your code can work within this environment but do you need help with this?  If so Gunnar has some great advice that is based on his experience while going through a similar process with Bean Validator and its reference implementation Hibernate Validator.


Intercepting JDBC within Hibernate


Many of us have developed applications using JDBC or hibermate and have needed to intercept the calls as they are being made to the database.  We may have used some of the existing products/utilities or may even have written our own JDBC drivers to handle this task.  If you are using hibernate then Vlad has some suggestions for an alternative solution that may be simpler and provide you with more flexibility.


Hibernate News


The Hibernate community have released the latest edition of their Community Newsletter, highlighting many interesting articles and discussions that have been taking place throughout their community.


Microservices and Verticals


If you are interested in microservices then check out Christian's article in which he discusses his thoughts on how best to split up your existing monolithic applications, preferring an approach in which we focus on  the functional verticals so that  better cohesion and separation of concerns are introduced in to the process.


Camel 2.18 Progress


With the Camel 2.18 release only a few months away Claus has taken time to provide us with an update to what will be a significant release.  Not only will this version be introducing new components to add support for the likes of Netflix OSS but this will be the first to require Java 8 as a runtime.


UberFire Forms Builder


The jBPM team will be integrating the UberFire Forms builder within their jBPM 7.0 distribution which will allow their users to design, build and deploy their own UI forms as part of the application.  If you are interested in the current progress of the Forms Builder then take a look at the video created by Pere and Eder.


JBoss in Print


This week sees the announcement of the Manning Early Access Program for Eric's current book entitled Effective Business Process Management with JBoss BPM.  If you wish to follow the process, with early access to the chapters as they are being written, then head over to the Manning site where you can sign up.


JBoss Out and About


If you are heading to Red Hat Summit 2016, being held in San Francisco from June 27th to June 30th, then don't forget to check out the Discovery session series.  These sessions will be hosted by various experts in the technologies and will provide demonstrations and an opportunity for discussions.


Congratulations to last week's winners of passed to DevNation 2016 in San Francisco, the lucky winners are Noe Javet, Mayk Ol, Omid Mehdizadeh Tourzan, Steve Cliff, Angus Miller and Abhishek Arora.  You can also win a pass by simply joining Red Hat Developers up until June 24th, this will automatically enter you in to the draw to win your free pass to DevNation 2016.


Mark Little recently attended DevoxxUK where he took part in a panel session about the future of JavaEE, included on the panel were representatives from the major Java EE vendors as well as representation from those who are using the technologies.

If you are heading to Red Hat Summit


New Releases



That's all for this week, we look forward to seeing you again next week as the march towards Red Hat Summit continues.

Is Open Source cooperative friendly ?


While Open Source has been around for several decades, it is still puzzling for the industry how to either use it, implement it or just respect the spirit of it. This first article, called Beyond the Hype Cycle; Co-operative Open Source gave an interesting outlook on Open Source and how the mechanics of co-operative (such as Cooperative UK) could interact with it.




If you are interest in AeroGear or Javascript in general, you should definitly check out this article on UnifiedPush, Promises and You - and see for yourself if it fulfills all of it's promises ! Along the same line, there is also a quite intriguing article on Node.js Javascript Client 0.3.0 out with improved stability and API docs.


However, if you feel that Java still rules, and you prefer it over Javascript, maybe it's time to give a chance to of the best framework out there: Drools ! Indeed, a new Tutorial oriented user guides for Drools and jBPM

have been released. Maybe an opportunity to learn it. After all, it may give you a reason to attend the upcoming Drools & jBPM: DecisionCamp And RuleML 2016, 6-9 July New York...


Evangelist's Corner


Our team of evangelist is relentless and of course, last week gave the opportunity to one of the most prolific of them, Eric D. SChabell, to release not one, but two very interesting articles. I especially recommend the second one, who brings Java developer out of their comfort zone, but for good reasons:





As the Red Hat Summit and the DevNation are coming up in a couple of weeks, it is for sure time to start taking a peek at the content of both conference. And the official blog of DevNation just released a couple of article about it:



Releases, releases, releases...



That's all for this week, please join us again for the next installment of the JBoss Editorial where we will endeavor to bring you more interesting articles written by members of the JBoss communities. And stay up to date with latest developments by following @jbossdeveloper on twitter.

You don’t need to track the JBoss community for long to realise that we are expanding far beyond the traditional server-based deployments of the past. This week in JBoss is no exception with bloggers turning their interests to Cloud, IoT, and Mobile.


Christian Posta gives us a preview of his up-coming book, where he talks about how to run Netflix OSS with Kubernetes.


The DevNation team announced an exciting IoT workshop due to be held at the event. Come along to get your free TI SensorTag and learn how to build IoT apps using it.


Stéphane Épardaud described how to uses the Ceylon IntelliJ plugin to write native Android applications in Ceylon in Android Studio.


Also, in other news: Mark Proctor presents early results from the first of many planned improvements to execute Drools in parallel. If your a Web Developer, excited by the Drools community, then you’ll be pleased the hear that the team are hiring!



Of course, we also have the usual flood of releases to report:


bart.jpgI wanted to start the weekly editorial out this week around "open" vs "open source".  Nicholas Gerasimatos, Cloud Evangelist, wrote an article The difference between ‘open’ and ‘open source’Open referring to an Open API that is freely available but closed source and proprietary. As Nicholas indicates, “open” alone may not be enough to give you the interoperability and flexibility that an organization is seeking.  Open Source could be the better option for the organization as it adheres to open standards, the source code is freely available and the solution can be modified  without violating a license.  The JBoss Community and the projects provide the source code for the ability to easily make modifications required to meet an organizations business needs.


This is a good segway into a decision on the Google vs Oracle Copyright suit.  Google won a jury verdict that kills Oracle Corp.’s claim to a $9 billion slice of the search giant’s Android phone business and may give comfort to programmers who write applications that run across different platforms without a license.  Schmidt told jurors that, based on his “many years of experience” with Java, he believed Google was permitted to use the APIs without a negotiated license, as long as the company relied on its own code. Sun promoted them as “free and open,” and not sold or licensed separately from Java, he said.


Now on to the happenings in our open source community!



  • Keycloak 1.9.5.Final Released -  We've increased the default password hashing intervals to 20000. Yes, you read that right. We've actually recommended using 20000 for a while now, but the default was only 1. This is a clear trade-off between performance and how secure passwords are stored. With 1 password hashing interval it takes less than 1 ms to hash a password, while with 20000 it takes tens of ms.  For the full list of resolved issues check out JIRA and to download the release go to the Keycloak homepage.
  • Teiid 9.0 CR1 Released - Teiid 9.0 CR1 is now available.  This is a very large release compared to most with 238 issues addressed so far.
  • Wildfly Swarm 1.0.0 CR1 - CLI Support, Enhanced standalone.xml support, SwarmTool, Resource Adapter archives, JPA fraction with PostgreSQL, Examples with WildFly Camel, Datasource configuration settable by properties
  • Hibernate Search version 5.6.0.Beta1 - The Elasticsearch integration made significant progress with over 60 task resolved.


Open Source Champions


Red Hat Cloud Suite



Eric Schabell, Red Hat Evangelist, shared a article and video on the Red Hat Cloud Suite.  The original article authored by James Labocki, Red Hat Product Marketing Manager, the original article can be found at  With the release of the Red Hat Cloud Suite there are a few interesting use cases that we wanted to present that showcase solutions using this product.  The article and video walks you through one of these use cases.The application showcased is a microservices application that leverages JBoss middleware technologies on top of the Red Hat Cloud Suite infrastructure.

Red Hat Cloud Suite is an integrated solution for developing container based applications on massively scalable infrastructure with all the management required to operate both. With OpenShift Enterprise, organizations can build microservices based applications allowing for greater change velocity. Also, they can reduce friction between development and operations by using a continuous integration and deployment pipeline for release. Red Hat OpenStack Platform allows organizations to deliver massively scalable public-cloud like infrastructure based on OpenStack to support container based applications. Finally, Red Hat CloudForms provides seamless management of OpenShift and OpenStack along with other major virtualization, private, and public cloud infrastructures. Best of all, these are all built from leading open source communities without a line of proprietary code – ensuring access to the greatest amount of innovation. It also comes with access to Red Hat’s proactive operations offering, Red Hat Insights allowing you to compare your environment with the wisdom of thousands of solved problems and millions of support cases.



  • Christian Posta, Principal Middleware Architect, shared two articles with us this week:
    • Why Microservices should be event driven: Autonomy vs Authority - I’ve been working on a series of articles showing how to build microservices using an event-driven approach (which IMHO is the only real way to build microservices or… any complex distributed architecture). I’ll explore DDD, CQRS, Event-sourcing, even streaming, complex-event processing and more. I’m using a reference monolith applicationbased on Java EE that uses all the typical Java EE technology and dives deep into what makes it tick, what drawbacks it has, and how to evolve it to a microservices architecture. I’ll show implementation details all the way from containers (Docker, Kubernetes) to the JVM layer (Spring Boot and WildFly Swarm) to the application architecture (events, commands, streaming, raw events, aggregates, aggregate roots, transactions, CQRS, etc). Hopefully it will be ready for my Red Hat Summit talk in San Francisco in June! Follow me on twitter @christianposta for updates on this project.
    • 3 easy things to make your microservices more resilient - One of the advantages of building distributed systems as microservices is the ability of the system as a whole to withstand faults and unexpected failures of components, networks, compute resources, etc. These systems are resilient even in the face of faults. The idea behind this resiliency seems simple: if our monolith fails, everything for which it’s responsible fails along with it; so let’s break things into smaller chunks so we can withstand individual pieces of our app failing without affecting the entire system.
  • Gary Brown shared with us the Monitoring Microservices for Application Performance, Distributed Tracing and Business Transactions - Although distributed systems and the concept of services have been around for a long time, the current trend towards microservices has added some new dimensions to the management problem.  The architectural approach leads to business applications comprised of a larger number of simple interacting services, each focused on specific business capabilities, and being responsible for their own data management. This has the benefit of allowing each service to be independently deployable, generally using automated continuous delivery. When used in a cloud environment, it facilitates dynamic scaling of individual services as required, and enables parts of the business application to be upgraded independently with minimal impact, allowing faster turnaround for fixing bugs and adding new features.  The downside of this dynamic, scalable and flexible architecture is being able to understand how your business application is operating, and when necessary tracing the execution path of a particular invocation through the multitude of services potentially geographically distributed.




Paolo Antinori shared with us Dynamic Blueprint Files with JEXL -  In this post I’ll show how to add a little bit of inline scripting in your Apache Aries Blueprint xml files. I wouldn’t call it necessarely a best practice, but I have always had the idea that this capability might be usueful; probably I started wanting this when I was forced to use xml to simulate imperative programming structures like when using Apache Ant.



Thanks for being a part of the JBoss Community and stay tuned for the next Weekly Editorial! 


Kenneth Peeples, Shadow-Soft Director of Technical Services


Welcome back everyone to another week at JBoss! As always some amazing work has happened this past week. We have a couple of blog and video updates, releases and upcoming conferences!


Our talented engineers have busily been turning caffeine into software with the end results being five new releases!

  • Forge 3.2.0 - This release features command inheritance, a Roaster upgrade and support for custom JPA @Id and @Version names
  • Hibernate OGM 5.0.0.Final - You can now use Redis (tech Preview), MongoDB Driver 3, Cassandra 2.2 new data types, Infinispan 8 and @PostLoad events are now supported. Great work team!
  • Byteman 3.0.6 - This release will be a stepping stone for 3.0.7 useful for those running Hawklar BTM.
  • Infinispan 9.0.0.Alpha2 (and 8.2.2.Final) - Not to be out done, the Infinispan team cranked out two releases this week! 8.2.2.Final fixes 57 issues. The new Alpha release of 9.0.0 fixes 138 issues and includes support for JDBC cache stores using upsert (a long awaited for issue), SNI support for HotRod, and Lucene query caching, as well as others.
A very well deserved congratulations to everyone working hard at shipping these bits!




The Hibernate group is participating in a Q&A event in London on May 24th. See Meetup for more information. June 16-18 is JBCNConf in Barcelona! Drools and jBPM will be there showcasing Drools with a hands on session and jBPM in a "Knowledge Driven Microservices" presentation. Of course Red Hat Summit and DevNation are getting closer and you can expect to see more news about these as the events draw closer.




To finish us out this week Eric Schabell and Christina Lin have been hard at work completing more in their blog series about Fuse, OpenShift and Red Hat Cloud Suite! Read up on these series below:


Welcome to another edition of the JBoss Weekly Editorial where we bring you up to speed with all that has been happening across the JBoss Communities.


Is Oauth2 secure enough ?


This week, we have debated a lot around Oauth2 after the publication of this post "Introducing TAuth: Why OAuth 2.0 is bad for banking APIs and how we're fixing it". This article suggests that OAuth2 is broken because client authentication is not strong enough. But as mentioned by Stian Thorgersen, there is nothing which prevent to authenticate the client using just an id and secret but any http based authentication mechanism (Basic, Digest) is permitted. Moreover, it is important when the architect designs the solution that he/she reviews the different possibilities offered to reenforce the security of the platform like mutual TLS, Token Expiration, Token introspection to intercept and revoke the client if required. Oauth2 like TLS and SSL are sometimes complex to use or to position correctly within a project and this is the reason why we are working hard to develop the project Keycloak in order to simplify the management of such SSO Architecture !


Evangelist's Corner

- Healthcare Demo by Christina Lin using Camel, HLT Dataformat & Mciroservices technology

- When JRubyFx meets Hawkular and help to design the GUI by Heiko Rupp

- Setup a Vacation Request Process using jBPM by Eric Schabell

Conferences, Events

Don't miss these incoming events where our fabulous coders will talk about :

- Infinispan at GeeCon 2016

- Camel, Microservices, Fabric8, Security, Apiman, Vert.x at JBCNConf 2016

- OpenShift, Mobile, Push Notification, HTTP/2, CDI at RivieraJUG 2016


Releases, release, releases ....



I hope this week's editorial has provided you with something of interest, please join us again next week when we will bring you more news from JBoss and the JBoss Communities.

Welcome another edition of the JBoss Weekly Editorial.  We begin this month's series of Editorials with a request for help from our friends behind the Red Hat Developers site.  Red Hat Developers are working to create a new developer community and need your help in order to shape it, they will be running monthly surveys to learn about the topics that interest you in order to help deliver content that you will find interesting and worth reading.  These surveys will not take very long to complete, usually taking up about a minute or so of your time, so please help to shape this community by providing feedback.  You can head over to this month's survey to begin or, if you are feeling more adventurous, you may even decide to join the many community members who are already contributing to the site.


Running JBoss HR Employee Rewards project in the Cloud


In his App Dev Cloud Stack series Eric Schabell has been making a strong case for why application developers shouldn't be ignoring their stack.  He has discussed the various layers that are involved, also including the use of the Container Development Kit and some example applications.  In this week's post Eric takes this a step further by walking us through a more complicated example of an application running within the Cloud, in this case an HR employee rewards example based on JBoss BPM.


Camel in Action 2 - Work in Progress


It has been over a year since Claus and Jonathan began writing an update to the popular Camel in Action book and while they have made significant progress over the year there is still a lot of work that remains to be done.  The current effort has already exceeded the page count of the original book however Claus and Jonathan have much more to give, extending the topics in the book to cover many new areas that are now included within the camel ecosystem.  If you are interested in Camel then consider signing up for the Early Access Program, any feedback you can provide will go a long way to help in the development of the book.


JBoss Out and About


Kris Verlaenen recently attended bpmNext 2016, a conference that focusses on Business Process Management software such as jBPM.  Kris has already written a series of posts discussing the presentations and demos that were given during the conference, he now concludes this series with some impressions that he was left with after all was finished.


Heiko Rupp will soon be attending ManageIQ Design Summit 2016 to give a presentation discussing the current status of Red Hat Middleware monitoring with RHQ and Hawkular, an update on the efforts underway to integrate with ManageIQ and more information about the direction in which the integration efforts are heading.


New Releases



That's all the news we have for you this week.  Please consider helping our friends over at the Red Hat Developers site and remember to join us next week when we will bring you more news from around our Communities.

Welcome to another edition of the JBoss Weekly Editorial! This past week has been full of quite a bit, so we’ll just get right to it.




That’s right, we’ve been hard at work bringing more quality software to you all. This past week saw many releases across a wide range of projects, some even having multiple releases in the same week!

That’s it for the releases this week, look for more next week!



The CDK, or Container Development Kit, is a pre-built development kit for writing container based application on Red Hat Enterprise Linux. Give it a spin regardless of the OS you’re running!Christina walks us through the Healthcare demo in the first part of a new demo series. The demo involves five different parties with multiple data languages involved. She’ll continue to break down the demo in the coming weeks, but it is a more realistic demonstration with multiple integrations and data translations.

Google Summer of Code

gsoc2016 sun 373x373As we approach summer (at least in the northern hemisphere) students looking for something to do, at least those who are enthusiastic about tech, turn to Google Summer of Code. Once again, JBoss has had the honor of been selected as a mentoring organization! On Friday April 22nd Google announced the following ten students assigned to work with JBoss. There were many additional proposals, more than 70 in all! We’d like to thank everyone who submitted and look forward to working with you in the coming months.

  • Idel Pivnitskiy: AeroGear WebPush and UnifiedPush Server integration
  • rohitmohan96: Ceylon Markdown
  • Lucas Werkmeister: Ceylon TypeScript Loader
  • Samuel Richardson: Drools Rules in Minecraft
  • Anton Gabov: Smart HTTP/2-based protocol for Infinispan
  • Austin Ko: Hawkular-agent For Vert.x
  • mincongh: Hibernate Search: JSR 352 batch job for re-indexing entities
  • Anuj Garg: Improve existing Android client of Hawkular
  • Tugba: Teiid HDFS Translator/Connector
  • dimcho: Test scheduling for large test suites

Welcome to another 'Week in JBoss'. This week was dominated by the announcements of many DevNation talks (more on that later). Expect DevNation and Summit to be a common theme over the coming months as the JBoss teams prepare their projects and products for our primary annual conference. As usual you can catch all the buzz around JBoss here, but for now, on with the editorial!


DevNation 2016 is Coming!

This June (26-29) we'll be back in San Francisco for the third DevNation conference. As usual you can expect a developer-focused conference with lots of exciting tech demos & presentations. We're also planning some great social events and hands-on hack nights! Hop over to the DevNation site where registration is open.




As usual there will be a strong representation from the JBoss team, with the following presentations announced this week:



Keep an eye out for more announcements an the full agenda on the DevNation site.


What's New in the World of BPM?

This week Kris Verlaenen attended the 'bpmNEXT 2016' conference and is (almost) live-blogging the whole experience. Catch the first four posts in his series: Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, Part 4. Stay tuned, maybe there will be some more?


New Releases!

No week at JBoss would be complete without a significant haul of new releases. Here's what we have for you this week:


Apologies for being a couple of weeks since the last instalment but we're here again! And what a couple of weeks it's been?!


Microservices has been dominating a lot of conversations across the industry for a while. Is it new? How does it relate to SOA? When I was on holiday recently I got a chance to put down a few thoughts on the subject, for instance how they relate to fundamental distributed systems, or what constitutes a microservice if in the future, as I suspect, we allow them to become dynamic systems? I also had a few musings on what typically leads to monoliths and how microservices isn't necessarily going to avoid those pitfalls. Take a look because your input in this technology wave is crucial.


The Infinispan team seem to have got stuck in releasing one version after another (which is a good thing!) First we had 8.2.1.Final, then 8.1.3.Final, and now 9.0.0.Alpha1! Never one to be outdone, the Arquillian team shot back with a Graphene release, a new Drone version (two actually), and the Container Undertow release! There have also been a number of other releases of projects so check out The Buzz!


Time for a couple of other highlights, such as Marc talking about APIMan in a network with limited connectivity, Heiko about Hawkular in ManageIQ sprints, Martin on Weld meeting Vert.x (great news!) and Vlad with the Hibernate newsletter.


Mauricio also had some good news about the Drools book he co-authored - it's out now! Good luck guys and I'm looking forward to the movie version!


OK that's it for now. Hopefully we'll be back in a week and not two

April Fools' Day traditionally involves the playing of pranks and hoaxes on others, often with media and other organisations making announcements that are then later exposed as jokes.  While these are mostly harmless pranks they do sometimes backfire and unfortunately may even have real world implications.  Of course we realise that those of you reading the Editorial would never fall for any of these pranks but read on with care, you never know what you are going to find


Users, Roles and Permissions with apiman


The apiman project provides an Open Source solution for API Management allowing you to govern your APIs with a flexible, policy based runtime.  The management of the runtime is controlled by permissions granted to a user through roles; these can either be the pre-defined set that comes with apiman or a custom based role that has been defined based on your requirements.  The management of users, roles and permissions is straight forward within apiman, for more information on this topic check out Len's post where he discusses the details of the pre-defined roles and how to set up a special role for his brother in law.


Apache Camel 2.18 Roadmap


There are some big changes potentially coming to the Camel community, the recent release of Camel 2.17 will be the last to support JDK 7 with Camel 2.18 basing on JDK 8.  If you are a user of Camel then now is the time to have your say about this change in direction, Claus has some more information about the changes that may be headed your way along with details of where you can join in the conversation so that the community can make a decision that is best for all.


Blue/Green deployments with Fuse Integration Services


Christina has been developing an Auto Dealership Management Demo as part of a series that discusses the advantages of using Fuse Integration Services.  In the sixth installment of the series Christina discusses how you can make use of Blue/Green deployments to deploy a new version of your application while retaining the necessary high availability for your application.


Hibernate News


If you are interested in the Hibernate community then the Hibernate Community Newsletter is always worth following, a regular newsletter that highlights many of the hibernates articles that have been published along with interesting discussions that have been taking place on the forums and on StackOverflow.


BRMS Application Development in the Cloud


As part of his App Dev Cloud Stack series Eric Schabell has often discussed why application developers can no longer ignore the stack.  In previous posts he has covered the Container Development  Kit (CDK) and its part in the puzzle, he is now moving up the stack to discuss the BRMS tooling and show how this can be installed within the Cloud environment.


New Releases



That's all from this week's editorial, I hope you managed to get through it unscathed and will join us again next week for some more news from around the JBoss Community.

This week has been horrible for many of us after the tragic events that took place in Brussels this Tuesday the 22th of March. But as the show must go on, you will find hereafter another edition of the JBoss Weekly Editorial where we bring you up to speed with all that has been happening across the JBoss Communities.


SOA Governance with the Api Catalog

Our middleware products offering has always suffered the comparison with the competition due to the lack of a SOA Service registry or catalog and the tooling that we need to manage / import services/apis. Hopefully, the situation is changing and as we can now use the API Catalog feature proposed by the Apiman project to :


Screenshot 2016-03-24 10.09.47.png
  • Manage for an organisation the APIs / Services that we can propose,
  • Import existing Apis (REST or Web Services endpoints) from a WADL file or a Swagger file,
  • Build our own catalog using the Api Catalog Plugin or a Catalog File


Thank to Eric Wittman which has blogged around that recently !


Turn on a Database to Event Streams with Debezium


Debezium is a distributed platform that turns your existing databases into event streams, so applications can see and respond almost instantly to each

committed row-level change in the databases. Debezium is built on top of Apache Kafka and provides Kafka Connect compatible connectors that monitor specific database management systems.

Debezium records the history of data changes in Kafka logs, so your application can be stopped and restarted at

any time and can easily consume all of the events it missed while it was not running, ensuring that all events are processed correctly and

completely !

Debezium has been designed around these architecture patterns : Change Data Capture (CDC) and Command Query Responsibility Separation (CQRS)


Hibernate Search & Elasticsearch


Hibernate Search can now store indexes and query from an Elasticsearch cluster. What's cool is that all of your Hibernate ORM applications can now be indexed by Elasticsearch. The index is kept synchronized with the database thanks to Hibernate Search.


More info in these blog entries:




Evangelist's Corner


Charles has released a collection of "In Action" projects hosted on the FuseByExample github repository to play and discover the RedHat Middleware

technology using Apache Camel, JBoss Fuse, FeedHenry, Linux Container but also the security around the endpoints using Apiman & Keycloak.


- REST DSL in Action : Design REST endpoints using Apache Camel REST DSL & Swagger API, manage the info using ElasticSearch & Kibana Dashboard

- Enforcement Security in Action : Secure Apache Camel endpoints using Apiman API Mngt & Keycloak Web SSO servers (basic authentication, Oauth2)

- Mobile & REST in action : Extend the project REST DSL in action project to run the application using Feedhenry js api, AngularJS & Apache Cordova

- MicroService in Action : Turn on Apache Camel project as MicroServices running top of Linux Containers and loadbalance the services using Kubernetes


Releases, release, releases ....



I hope this week's editorial has provided you with something of interest, please join us again next week when we will bring you more news from JBoss and the JBoss Communities.

If spring has yet to come to us (at least in Europe), there is a definitly a feeling of "waking up", all over the community. Projects are releasing, as they always do, but important milestones are coming - and with them, the release of crucial and exciting features...

Waking up the bear


brown bear at Skansen3-3


The Hibernate community has grown over the border of the Hibernate framework for a long time now. Numerous projects, like the Hibernate ORM (which just released 5.0.9.Final) and Hibernate Search (which just 5.6.0.Alpha3) are part of this blooming community.

Thus it was decided to set up a dedicated Hibernate Community Newsletter, to allow people interest by all (or most) of those projects, to easily follow their activities.


In the Eye of the Hawkular



On top of releasing the 1.0.0.Alpha11, which is getting the project closer and closer to the 1.0.0 milestone, Hawkular team took the time to produce a Hawkular features overview (1.0.0.Alpha11). The article covers quickly how Hawkular can (graphically) monitor business transactions or application performance, alongside dealing with management operations and artifacts deployments.


Also, to show how flexible and extendable the project is, one of the developer, Heiko Rupp, produced a very intriguing blog entry on Reacting on IoT data with Hawkular. This new article is a follow up on his previous ones on Sending IoT sensor data to Hawkular-Metrics via MQTT and Send IoT data to Hawkular-full and all of them certainly forms an exciting testimony to the possibility offered by Hawkular.


Evangelist's Corner


Last week, Christina has released the part four of a her Fuse Integration Service demo on"Auto Dealership Management"

and, as always, Eric D. Schabell has been quite prolific and produced a guide on Installing the Red Hat Container Development Kit (CDK), but also take the time to answer some questions on OpenShift Profiles (An interview with Eric D. Schabell).



Worth to mention here is certainly the opening of the Call For Paper - Riveria Dev, a conference located in the south of France, at Sophia-Antipolis, on the 16 and 17 June. The CfP itself closes on the 30th April. If you have the chance to be able to apply or attend, please do so, I only hear good things about this event !

Releases, releases, releases...


The JBoss community would not be as thriving as it is, if it were not to release as often as it does. Thus, this week is again having its fair share of interesting releases:



I hope this week's editorial has provided you with something of interest, please join us again next week when we will bring you more news from JBoss and the JBoss Communities.

The editorial this week is brought to you by Jason Porter, Senior Software Engineer



Today back in 1818 Mary Shelley published Frankenstein; or, The Modern Prometheus![1] It is often considered to be the first science fiction novel. We may not have such exciting firsts this week, but the tech community has seen more announcements that would have been considered science fiction 10 years ago. Microsoft has continued it’s advance into the OSS area with the announcement of joining the Eclipse Foundation [2] and SQL Server for Linux![3]

I know I’m anxious to see any further moves in the tech industry in the near future!


On to our Week in JBoss!




New Releases


  • Immutant 2.1.3 - notable fixes include a regression with :dispatch? false broken since 2.1.0 and new functions in the immutant.web.undertow namespace.
  • Infinispan 8.2.0.Final - this release includes perf improvements, changes to Infinispan server, and reduced network usage for remote reads
  • Keycloak 1.9.1.Final - over 50 issues in JIRA have been closed with this release!
  • Teiid 8.13.2 - 27 issues have been fixed including a TEIID-4017 an important security fix, please upgrade if you are not already using 8.13.2
  • Ceylon 1.2.2 - over 70 issues have been fixed in this release, on the JVM this release is backwards compatible, however, for JavaScript it is not. There is a new ceylon bootstrap command to easily distribute code and work with Java Collections has been improved in this release.


Congrats to all the releases which happened this week. I know hard work was put in by many people in making these happen.


Presentations about JBoss Technologies




More from the week


  • Eric Schabell continues his series about the App Dev Cloud Stack in It’s all about the PaaS baby
  • Eric Wittmann tells us how to store apiman gateway configurations in a database in Storing Your Gateway Config in a Database
  • Get to know one of our youngest Hibernate contributors, Martin Braun at Meet Martin Braun, the youngest Hibernate contributor
  • Part three of Christina Lin’s Auto Dealership Management Demo was released this week. This part details information about collecting data via the Customer IoT Service which simulates GPS data being sent in from customers' cars to determine how close they are to a dealership.


Thanks for a wonderful week!


Jason Porter @lightguardjp



leap year.png

This year we have one extra day to enjoy Open Source Software by JBoss.  This past Monday was February 29th so I thought I would share why we have one extra day on the calendar every 4 years.


One orbit of Earth around the Sun takes 365.2422 days—a little more than our Gregorian calendar’s 365. Adding an extra day, aka a leap day, to the calendar every 4 years brings the calendar in line and therefore synchronizes with the four seasons.  Without leap days, the calendar would be off by 5 hours, 48 minutes, 45 seconds each year. After 100 years, the seasons would be off by 25 days. The extra leap day adjusts this drift.


A year is a leap year if it is divisible by 4, but century years are not leap years unless they are divisible by 400.  So, the years 1700, 1800, and 1900 were not leap years, but the year 2000 was. Non-leap years begin and end on the same day of the week.


So to determine a leap year here is a quick algorithm:


if (year is not divisible by 4) then (it is a common year)

  else if (year is not divisible by 100) then (it is a leap year)

    else if (year is not divisible by 400) then (it is a common year)

      else (it is a leap year)


I hope everyone had a great week. So onto our Week in JBoss...


New Releases

Fuse and Camel

Christina Lin shared part 2 of her Auto DealershipManagement DemoThis series of blog is based on building an auto dealership management system on Fuse Integration Service. It creates three major functions in the system:

  • Sales report tracking
  • Vehicle inventory status
  • Customer IoT Service

Claus Ibsen shared the continuation of the video blogs he has done about our development on the fabric8 Camel tools.  He covers the camel tools to add or edit endpoints from the current cursor position.

KIE Server

Maciej Swiderski shares the capabilities of the jBPM UI extension on the KIE server.  One of the most desired use case is to be able to visualize state of given process instance - including graphical annotations about which nodes are active and which are already completed, showing complete flow of the process instance.  This has been added to KIE Server as part of jBPM UI extensions and provides following capabilities:

  • display process definition diagram as SVG
  • display annotated process instance diagram as SVG
    • greyed out are completed nodes
    • marked as red are active nodes
  • display structure of process forms
  • display structure of task forms

He also shares what Wildfly Swarm means in the context of the KIE Server.

More from the week

Thanks for reading and being a part of a great community....


Kenneth Peeples